Coming to hou in 2022

Texas Medical Center reveals new details and renderings for its TMC3 campus

The design and construction team has been announced for TMC3. Courtesy of Elkus Manfredi Architects

The Texas Medical Center just announced the dream team of architects and designers that are making TMC3 into a reality.

Elkus Manfredi Architects, Transwestern, and Vaughn Construction are the three companies that will serve as the architectural and development team for the 37-acre research campus. TMC3's founding institutions — TMC, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center — decided on the three entities.

"Texas Medical Center is eager to move forward with a bold, imaginative and dynamic new design vision for the TMC3 Master Plan," says TMC CEO and president, Bill McKeon, in a press release. "With the combined talents of Elkus Manfredi Architects, Transwestern, and Vaughn Construction on-board, I couldn't be more confident that this dream team will flawlessly execute the totality of the project's vision and fulfill its mission to bring together leading researchers and top-tiered expertise from the private sector to create the number one biotechnology and bioscience innovation center in the entire world."

TMC3 was first announced just over a year ago and is planned to open in 2022. The campus will incorporate research facilities, retail space, residential plans, a hotel and conference center, and green space. Parking will be underground to optimize surface area.

Design in mind

The 37-acre research campus will be interconnected by a DNA helix outdoor promenade.

Courtesy of Elkus Manfredi Architects

From a design perspective, the key element will be a DNA helix-shape that looks like a necklace chain that connects the campus.

"Our idea was to expand on the DNA design concept and create a series of spaces that would elongate the strand all the way north to the historic core of the Texas Medical Center and south to the new development by UTHealth and MD Anderson in order to create more opportunity for connections and collisions," says Elkus Manfredi Architects CEO and founding principal, David Manfredi, in the release. "We're implementing the connective tissue between all these places and establishing opportunities for unplanned interactions. Science, technology, medicine, discovery and innovation are all about making connections, and we are building a space for institutions, industry and startups to interact."

Manfredi's firm is responsible for a few other iconic medical facilities, such as the original Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and The Stanley Building at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the New York Genome Center.

"We want to create spaces that attract talent," Manfredi says in the release. "You can attract talent with great colleagues, research and facilities, but if you don't have a great social environment for people to live, learn, and play, people move on. We are creating a place where people will want to be because they're constantly stimulated – whether it's breakfast at the local coffee shop, or a volleyball league in the afternoon, or working in a central lab and the person next to them is doing something intersects with their own research."

Growing partner institutions

TMC3 Collaborative will be a centrally located building on the campus that is designed to host gatherings and share space with industry leaders.

Courtesy of Elkus Manfredi Architects

While a big portion of the attraction in the new campus is this multi-purposeful and connective space, the project opens doors for the five partner institutions. For Baylor College of Medicine, TMC3 means an expansion of its facilities and an increased footprint for Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center's McNair Campus. The second tower of the hospital will be right at TMC3's eastern edge.

"The selection of a development team is an important milestone for the TMC3 project," says Paul Klotman, president, CEO and executive dean of Baylor College of Medicine, in the release. "The project itself is a huge step in developing the biotech industry in Houston. At Baylor, we look forward to working closely with TMC leaders, as well as those of the other anchor institutions, in making this project a reality."

Additionally, the Texas A&M Health Science Center research building — led by Carrie L. Byington, M.D — on the north end adjacent to BCM's building and the hotel and conference center. On the south side of the campus, MD Anderson and UTHealth will each develop new research facilities that will connect to the existing University of Texas Research Park that is directly to the south of the campus. UT Research Park will be connected to TMC3 via a new skybridge.

The release also describes a central building dubbed TMC3 Collaborative that will create collaborative research space for industry partners. The first level of the building will be an open atrium for gatherings and have food and beverage concepts.

"When TMC3 opens in 2022, Texas Medical Center will officially plant a tangible flag that signals its arrival as the Third Coast for life sciences for the foreseeable future," McKeon says in the release.

InformAI can use its data technology to help doctors with preventative care and diagnoses. Courtesy of InformAI

A Houston-based startup has a new technology that allows hospitals and medical establishments better access to its own data – which translates into more effective diagnoses and preventative care.

InformAI — founded by Jim Havelka, CEO, in 2017 — is introducing the technology to the Texas Medical Center. Havelka saw a need within the medical industry for this type of service.

"There were several things missing," says Havelka. "One was access to very large data sets, because it wasn't really until the last five or 10 years that digitalization of data, especially in the healthcare vertical became more widespread and available in a format that's usable. The second convergence was the technology, the ability to process very large data sets."

InformAI currently offers four unique solutions using artificial intelligence and deep learning algorithms: Paranasal Sinus Classifier; Brain Cancer Classifier; Patient Outcome Predictors; and Surgical Risk Predictors.

According to the website, both medical image classifiers assist physicians in detecting the presence of medical conditions. The Paranasal Sinus Classifier detects and distinguishes medical conditions prevalent in the paranasal sinuses. The classifier assists physicians by evaluating sinus medical conditions at the point of care, speeding up radiologist workflow by flagging medical conditions for further review, and providing a triage of pending sinus patient study reviews. The Brain Cancer Classifier focuses on several tumor types and has the potential to provide radiologists and surgeons with additional insights to inform their diagnoses and treatment plans.

In addition to the classifier solutions, the predictors are also key to patient care, as InformAI patient outcome predictors evaluate the risk of adverse outcomes from a surgical procedure.

"Our data set has 275,000 surgical procedures that we can use to look for patterns, and then use that to understand how a patient may react to going through that surgical procedure and that's a very valuable input to surgeons," Havelka tells InnovationMap. Patient outcome risks include mortality, stroke, prolonged ventilation, infection, re-operation, and prolonged hospitalization.

"The innovation is the ability to use artificial intelligence to augment the capabilities of the physician and flag diagnostics for them to consider," says Havelka. "For example, one of our image classifiers that reads three-dimensional CT scans has the equivalent of thirty lifetimes of an expert EMT built into it. It would take thirty lifetimes of an EMT to see that same number of scans, or number of patients, in their lifetime, so these tools are quite valuable to learn patterns that these expert physicians just wouldn't have seen in their lifetime."

InformAI currently has 10 full-time employees and works with radiologists-in-residence in building solutions and conducting research. The startup partners with the Texas Medical Center, Nvidia, Amazon, and Microsoft.

"They're quite interested in what we've built because it's really cutting edge technology that we're doing," Havelka tells InnovationMap.

Havelka and his team also work with some of the largest physician groups and imaging companies in the country to build products. "At the end of the day our core competency is the ability to take data, medical images or patient data, and put it into a usable format to assist physicians in making better treatment decisions for patients," says Havelka. "We can flag and detect patterns, disease states, and risk profiles that can improve the decision making of the physicians for the patient.

InformAI has plans to fundraise this year, with a goal of raising $5 million to $6 million in a round.