money moves

Houston-based Chevron Technology Ventures makes investments in carbon capture and spatial artificial intelligence

Chevron has commissioned a carbon capture study on one of its California sites. Photo courtesy of Chevron

Chevron's Houston-based investment and innovation arm has made moves within the carbon capture and spatial artificial intelligence spaces.

Chevron Technology Ventures has commissioned a carbon capture study with Vancouver-based Svante Inc., an at-scale carbon capture technology company. The study will explore the success of a 10,000 tonne-per-year carbon capture unit in a California Chevron facility. This study is expected to be completed in the first half of this year.

"At Chevron, we believe our industry is well-positioned to help commercialize carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies that will be essential for the energy transition," says Barbara Burger, president of CTV, in a news release. "We have leveraged venture capital and trial capabilities, our experience, and our operations to support the development of low carbon solutions."

Chevron first invested in Svante in 2014, and established its Future Energy Fund in 2018 to focus on "technologies that enable the energy transition," the release reads.

"Demonstrating this technology in the field is an important step in advancing a technology towards commercialization and scale," Burger says in the release. "Commissioning this study reflects our commitment to advance breakthrough innovation that will be important in a low carbon economy and help Chevron deliver on our mission to produce and provide affordable, reliable and ever-cleaner energy."

Barbara Burger leads Houston-based Chevron Technology Ventures as president. Courtesy of CTV

Meanwhile, a Dallas startup is emerging from stealth mode and announcing a $10 million series A round with contribution from CTV.

Worlds, a spin-off company from Hypergiant Sensory Sciences, is developing a technology for extended reality in a physical space. The spatial AI platform's round was led by Ohio-based Align Capital with support from Piva and Hypergiant Industries as well.

"We are creating one of the most powerful manifestations of AI yet, an AI-driven automation platform for physical environments," says Dave Copps, CEO of Worlds, in a news release.

The Worlds technology would be the first of its kind and would use deep learning combined with IoT to create a 4D environment, according to the release. The XR market has been estimated to grow to over $209 billion in the next few years, per a recent report, representing an 800 percent increase in market opportunity.

"Our investment in Worlds reflects our belief that digital innovation plays a critical role in accelerating business value at Chevron," says Burger in the release. "CTV evaluates digital technologies that can help Chevron make better and faster decisions to enable us to deliver on our mission to produce reliable, affordable, and ever-cleaner energy."

Alex Robart, CEO of Ambyint, joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss his plans to grow his company. Photo courtesy of Ambyint

After years of having to educate potential customers about the game-changing technology that artificial intelligence can be, Alex Robart, CEO of Ambyint, says it's a different story nowadays.

"We're seeing our customers spend a little more time understanding AI," Robart says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "More and more boards of mid-sized [exploration and production companies] are challenging their executive teams to do something with AI."

Ambyint, a Calgary-based energy tech startup with its sales and executive teams based in Houston, uses AI to optimize well operations — Robart describes it as a Nest thermostat but for oil rigs. On average, 80 percent of wells aren't optimized — they are either running too fast and not getting enough out of the ground or running too slow and wasting energy, Robart says.

Recently, Ambyint closed its series B investment round at $15 million led by Houston-based Cottonwood Venture Partners led the round with contribution from Houston-based Mercury Fund. Robart says these funds will go to growing their technology to work on a greater variety of wells as well as hire people in both the Canada and Houston offices.

Robart runs Ambyint with his twin brother Chris, who serves as president of the company. The pair have long careers as serial entrepreneurs and even run an energy tech investment company, called Unconventional Capital. Between the two shared companies, the brothers have their own niches.

"We've been really thoughtful about ensuring that we take on different portfolios — we don't really own things jointly. That's been really helpful for us to carve out our own spheres that we own," Robart says."Chris has really become our lead customer-facing person on all things new products."