Research roundup

Here are 3 research projects to watch in Houston

From CBD treatment for man's best friend to smart tech for senior living, here are three research projects coming out of the Bayou City. Getty Images

Research, perhaps now more than ever, is crucial to expanding and growing innovation in Houston.

In InnovationMap's latest roundup of research projects, we look into studies on traffic-reducing technology, recently funded projects on senior living devices, and the effect of CBD oil on four-legged arthritis patients.

University of Houston researchers look into tech to solve traffic jams

Photo via uh.edu

Traffic in major cities including Houston has been a growing problem — especially as populations grow. But, when considering ways to alleviate the issue, University of Houston researchers found that technology — 511 traffic information systems and roadside cameras to traffic apps like Waze and Google Maps – is already helping the situation.

"Technology has the potential to help society, and one way is to help us make better infrastructure decisions and put less pressure on roads," says Paul A. Pavlou, dean of the C.T. Bauer College of Business and author for the report, in a UH news release.

Pavlou, whose report was published by Information Systems Research, and colleagues Aaron Cheng of the London School of Economics and Min-Seok Pang of Temple University discovered that Intelligent Transportation Systems, or ITS, saved cities using the technology more than $4.7 billion a year in lost work or productivity, 175 million hours a year in travel time, 53 million gallons a year in fossil fuel consumption, and 10 billion pounds less CO2 emitted each year, according to the release.

Houston, for instance, has yet to adopt a 511 traveler information system, but has worked with private companies to design and build intelligent transportation systems.

"Traffic is even worse than before since people move where the roads are built and drive more," Pavlou says. "The city is growing, but there are alternative ways that do not impose some much demand on roads with the intelligent use of technology in parallel."

Baylor College of Medicine's CBD research on canine arthritis

Photo via bcm.edu

Just like mankind, man's best friend is subject to arthritis. A study from Baylor College of Medicine in collaboration with Medterra CBD is looking into how cannabidiol, or CBD, can improve conditions in arthritis patients of both species.

The study was published in the journal PAIN and found that CBD treatment improved the quality of life for the dogs with artritis.

"CBD is rapidly increasing in popularity due to its anecdotal health benefits for a variety of conditions, from reducing anxiety to helping with movement disorders," says corresponding author Dr. Matthew Halpert, research faculty in the Department of Pathology and Immunology at Baylor, in a news release. "In 2019, Medterra CBD approached Baylor to conduct independent scientific studies to determine the biological capabilities of several of its products."

Arthritis is a common condition in dogs, with the American Kennel Club finding that it affects around 20 percent of dogs in the United States. Plus, according to the release, the dogs' conditions are similar to humans.

"We studied dogs because experimental evidence shows that spontaneous models of arthritis, particularly in domesticated canine models, are more appropriate for assessing human arthritis pain treatments than other animal models. The biological characteristics of arthritis in dogs closely resemble those of the human condition," Halpert says.

According to Halpert, the study found good results. Nine of the 10 dogs on CBD showed benefits, he says.

Rice University's senior living tech receives grants

Photo via rice.edu

Rice University researchers who are looking into technology that can advance senior living facilities have received three new grants to continue their study.

According to a press release from Rice, the Internet of Things and Aging-in-Place Seed Grants, which is funded by Rice ENRICH and UTHealth, support research teams that "work together to test ideas, gather critical information and lay the groundwork for larger grant applications in the future."

"The Rice ENRICH office serves to facilitate collaborations of Rice faculty with those at TMC (Texas Medical Center) institutions," says Marcia O'Malley, a professor of mechanical engineering at Rice and an adviser to the provost for Rice ENRICH, in the release. "Our recent engagement with UTHealth and the seed funds awarded demonstrates Rice's commitment to building lasting relationships in the TMC community."

The grants were awarded to three projects:

  1. "Aging in Place with Cognitive Impairment: Toward User-Centered Assistive Technologies. " This study will look into availability and usefulness of assistive technologies among white, Hispanic, and African American patients with mild cognitive impairment to moderate dementia.
  2. "Facial and Body Motion Technology to Detect Psychosocial Distress in Stroke Survivors and Informal Caregivers Living at Home." This study will look at stroke survivors and their informal caregivers to help test technologies in a simulated home environment and look for signs of psychosocial distress, which can contribute to poor health outcomes.
  3. "An AI-powered chatbot for supporting the medication information needs of older adults." —This study will develop a voice-activated system that could be integrated into smart assistants to answer medication-related questions.

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Building Houston

 
 

This week's roundup of Houston innovators includes Thomas Vassiliades of BiVACOR, Katie Mehnert of ALLY Energy, and Don Whaley of OhmConnect Texas. Courtesy photos

Editor's note: In this week's roundup of Houston innovators to know — the first of this new year — I'm introducing you to three local innovators across industries — from health care innovation to energy — recently making headlines in Houston innovation.


Thomas Vassiliades, CEO of BiVACOR

BiVACOR named Thomas Vassiliades as CEO effective immediately. Photo courtesy of BiVACOR

Thomas Vassiliades has been named CEO of BiVACOR, and he replaces the company's founder, Daniel Timms, in the position. BiVACOR is on track to head toward human clinical trials and commercialization, and Vassiliades is tasked with leading the way.

Vassiliades has over 30 years of experience within the medical device industry as well as cardiothoracic surgery. He was most recently the general manager of the surgery and heart failure business at Abiomed and held several leadership roles at Medtronic. Dr. Vassiliades received his MD from the University of North Carolina, and his MBA was achieved with distinction at Emory University.

“I am excited and honored to join the BiVACOR team, working closely with Daniel and the entire team as we look forward to bringing this life-changing technology to the market,” says Dr. Vassiliades in the release. “Throughout my career, I’ve been guided by the goal of bringing innovative cardiovascular therapies to the market to improve patient care and outcomes – providing solutions for those that don’t have one. BiVACOR is uniquely well-positioned to provide long-term therapy for patients with severe biventricular heart failure.” Click here to read more.

Katie Mehnert, CEO and founder of ALLY Energy

Katie Mehnert joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss the future of energy amid a pandemic, climate change, the Great Resignation, and more. Photo via Katie Mehnert

Katie Mehnert started ALLY Energy — originally founded as Pink Petro — to move forward DEI initiatives, and she says she started with building an audience first and foremost, but now the technology part of the platform has fallen into place too. Last summer, ALLY Energy acquired Clean Energy Social, which meant doubling its community while also onboarding new technology. On the episode, Mehnert reveals that this new website and platform is now up and running.

"We launched the integrated product a few weeks back," Mehnert says. "The whole goal was to move away from technology that wasn't serving us."

Now, moving into the new year, Mehnert is building the team the company needs. She says she hopes to grow ALLY from two employees to 10 by the end of the year and is looking for personnel within customer support, product developers, and sales and service. While ALLY is revenue generating, she also hopes to fundraise to further support scaling. Click here to read more.

Don Whaley, president at OhmConnect Texas

Texas is about a month away from the anniversary of Winter Storm Uri — would the state fair better if it saw a repeat in 2022? Photo courtesy

The state of Texas is about a month away from the one year anniversary of Winter Storm Uri — but is the state better prepared this winter season? Don Whaley, president at OhmConnect Texas, looked at where the state is now versus then in a guest column for InnovationMap.

"Governor Abbott has gone on record guaranteeing that the lights will stay on this winter, and I am inclined to agree. With the reinforcement of our fuel systems being mandated by the Railroad Commission, 2023 to 2025 should receive the same guarantee," he writes. "Beyond that, as the demand for electricity in Texas continues to grow, we will need to rely on the initiatives under consideration by the PUCT to attract investment and innovation in new, dispatchable generation and flexible demand solutions to ensure long-term stability in the ERCOT market.

Whaley has worked for over 40 years in the natural gas, electricity, and renewables industries, with specific experience in deregulated markets across the U.S. and Canada. He founded Direct Energy Texas and served as its president during the early years of deregulation. Click here to read more.

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