Tilman Fertitta is taking Landry's public. Photo by J. Thomas Ford

Tilman Fertitta is about to become even wealthier. The Houston billionaire announced that his company, Fertitta Entertainment, will go public via a merger with FAST Acquisition Corp. (NYSE: FST).

In total, the deal will be worth approximately $6.6 billion. It includes over 500 restaurant locations — ranging from Saltgrass Steakhouse to Mastro's — five Golden Nugget Hotel and Casinos, and Fertitta's stake in Golden Nugget Online Gaming. That valuation is based on projected earnings of $648 million in 2022.

Fertitta will own 60 percent of the company and will serve as its president, chairman, and CEO. Prior to the transaction, Forbes estimated Fertitta's net worth at $4.1 billion. His stake in the new company will grow that amount by $2 billion.

The merger does not include Fertitta's other hotels, such as The Post Oak, his properties in Galveston such as the Pleasure Pier, or the Houston Rockets.

Landry's operated as a public company until 2010, when Fertitta took it private. Going public now allows the company to pursue acquisitions and take advantage of opportunities presented by the downturn is both restaurants and casinos as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The new company will benefit from both the increase in casino and online gaming taking place across the country as well as decreased competition due to restaurant closures, it states in a press release.

"I want to do big gaming deals," Fertitta told Bloomberg News. "Thirty years ago there was gambling in two states. Now we're approving new states for online almost on a weekly basis."

Merging with FAST instead of going through a traditional IPO allows the transaction to be completed more quickly. The deal is expected to be finalized in the second quarter of 2021.

"After I compared the opportunities provided by a transaction with FAST, versus the traditional IPO route, it became abundantly clear that we could access the capital markets with more certainty and speed if we did a deal with FAST," Fertitta said in a statement. "At the end of the day, the decision to do a deal with FAST was a no-brainer."

Institutional investors will contribute $1.2 billion and own 35 percent of the company. FAST will contribute the $200 million it raised via an initial public offering; its sponsors will own 1 percent of the company. Public investors will own 4-percent. Shares in FAST are up 4 percent at the time of publication.

Fertitta has arranged a merger with a special purpose acquisition company before. In 2020, Golden Nugget Online Gaming, Inc. (NASDAQ: GNOG) went public via a similar transaction. It's currently trading at approximately $18 per share.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Houston entrepreneur Megan Eddings' activewear brand has received national attention. Courtesy of Accel Lifestyle

Houston entrepreneur snags national spotlight and mentorship from Tilman Fertitta

featuring founders

Fashion and science have more in common than you think: Just ask Accel Lifestyle founder and CEO Megan Eddings, who spent three years developing the Prema fabric used in the ethical and environmentally friendly activewear brand she launched in Houston.

"I've always loved science. I've always been fascinated by things you can't see which is, to me, science and chemistry," Eddings tells CultureMap.

Her fascination with fashion and science has paid off: Eddings is one of 40 selected entrepreneurs across the United States to participate in Inc. Magazine's Founders Project. In honor of Inc.'s 40th anniversary, it launched the year-long project. Designed to assist entrepreneurs to grow their business, the initiative will match 40 established entrepreneurs, including Houston's billionaire Tilman Fertitta, MailChimp's Ben Chestnut, and Drybar's Ali Webb to provide advice, access to capital, marketing guidance, and other valuable assets.

Eddings says she was blown away and couldn't wait to learn about the new mentor-mentee relationship. "I was super excited to be paired with Tilman Fertitta," she says.

Fertitta, the sole owner of Fertitta Entertainment, the restaurant giant Landry's, the Golden Nugget Casinos and Hotels, and the NBA's Houston Rockets tells CultureMap he, "enjoyed meeting Megan and learning more about her unique product. She will surely be another successful Houston entrepreneur and look forward to following her growth."

Eddings says Fertitta has already shared his expertise as she continues pitching Accel Lifestyle to national retailers.

"We've already had a few conversations," she says. "One was about wholesale versus retail, which was printed in the November issue, and there was a video interview published on Inc.com."

With a degree in chemistry from the University of Virginia and experience working in labs at UVA and Brown University, Eddings put her education to use after pondering why her husband's sweaty gym clothes weren't coming out clean.

Her anti-stink fabric ensures consumers are less likely to throw away their clothing, which is a strong focus for the brand — not contributing to the landfill epidemic. With antimicrobial properties, the proprietary fabric is ideal for various industries besides fitness, including hospitality, medical, automotive, and more.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Samantha Lewis, Tilman Fertitta, and Tiffany Masterson are this week's innovators to know in Houston. Courtesy images

3 Houston innovators to know this week

Who's who

Houston entrepreneurs never cease to impress, leaving a mark on the city for their business minds, creativity, and overall gumption. This week's three innovators to know are no exception.

From a startup venture capitalist and Houston's most recognizable billionaire to a local mom that created — and now sold — a skincare line with a cult following, these are this week's innovative Houstonians to keep an eye on.

Samantha Lewis, director at The GOOSE Society of Texas

Courtesy of Samantha Lewis

Houston has a big fan in Samantha Lewis. The New Mexico native found her way to Texas by way of Texas A&M University before joining the Houston innovation ecosystem and getting her MBA at Rice University.

On the second episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast, Lewis, who's the director at The GOOSE Society of Texas, shares her story of wanting to work in venture capital, but being afraid Houston's venture activity would be too slim. She stuck it out and now the ecosystem is in good place for growth.

"We have to think about getting more capital available for companies that add strategic value to Houston," Lewis says on the podcast. Click here to read more and to listen.

Tilman Fertitta, owner of Fertitta Entertainment

Photo by J. Thomas Ford

Likely, Tilman Fertitta is already a name known and in need of no reminder, but the Houston billionaire is again in the headlines. Fertitta, who just recently acquired Del Frisco's steakhouse chain, has released a new business book, Shut Up and Listen! The book contains the entrepreneur's business advice and "Tilmanisms."

"I thought that I would always write a life story book, but Harper Collins approached me and said they wanted a business management book," Fertitta tells CultureMap. I can't tell you how many times we sat around with my close group and edited this book at the end and went through it five times and read it. If we found a paragraph that was boring, we got rid of it or rewrote it."

CultureMap sat down with Fertitta during a rare break to talk books, business, and his beloved Bayou City. Click here to read the interview.

Tiffany Masterson, chief creative officer and founder of Drunk Elephant

Photo via Business Wire

It was a good week for Houstonian Tiffany Masterson. She sold her skincare line, Drunk Elephant, for a reported $845 million to international makeup giant, Shiseido Company Ltd.

"I started this business as an industry outsider, and from the beginning I did things a little differently," Masterson says in a news release. "To join with a powerhouse beauty company such as Shiseido that leads the industry in innovation and global excellence is a dream come true for me and for Drunk Elephant. We share similar values, most importantly an unwavering commitment to the consumer. I chose a partner who will let the brand continue to be itself, with the same formulations and the same team."

Masterson will stay on with the company as the acquisition allows her products to reach a wider, worldwide audience. Click here to read more.

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Houston SaaS startup closes $12M series A funding round with support from local VC

money moves

A Houston startup with a software-as-a-service platform for the energy transition has announced it closed a funding round with participation from a local venture capital.

Molecule closed its $12 million series A, and Houston-based Mercury Fund was among the company's investors. The company has a cloud-based energy trading and risk management solution for the energy industry and supports power, natural gas, crude/refined products, chemicals, agricultural commodities, softs, metals, cryptocurrencies, and more.

"We led the seed round of Molecule upon their formation and are excited to participate in their series A," says Blair Garrou, co-founder and managing director of Mercury, in a news release. "Molecule's success in the ETRM/CTRM industry, especially in relation to electricity and renewables, positions them as the company to beat for the energy transition in the 2020s."

The company will use its new funds to further build out its product as well as introduce offerings to manage renewables credits, according to the release.

"In 2020, we realized that electricity — the growth commodity of the 2020s — represented over half of Molecule's customer base, and we decided to double down," says Sameer Soleja, founder and CEO of Molecule, in the release. "We were also rated the No. 1 SaaS ETRM/CTRM vendor. With this fundraise, we have the fuel to become No. 1 SaaS platform for power and renewables, and then the market leader overall.

"Molecule is ready to power the energy transition," Soleja continues.

Molecule's last round of funding closed in November 2014. The $1.1 million seed round was supported by Mercury Fund and the Houston Angel Network.

Houston-based afterlife planning startup launches new app

there's an app for that

The passing of a loved one is followed with grief — and paperwork. A Houston company that's simplifying the process of afterlife planning and decision making is making things even easier with a new smartphone app.

The Postage, a digital platform meant to ease with affair planning, recently launched a mobile app to make the service more accessible following a particularly deadly year. The United States recorded 3.2 million fatalities — the most deaths in its history, largely due to the coronavirus pandemic.

After losing three family members back-to-back, Emily Cisek dealt first hand with the difficulty of wrapping up a loved one's life. She saw how afterlife planning interrupted her family's grieving and caused deep frustration. Soon, she began to envision a solution to help people have a plan and walk through the process of losing someone.

The Postage, which launched in September, provides a platform for people to plan their affairs and leave behind wishes for loved ones. The website includes document storage and organization, password management, funeral and last wishes planning, and the option to create afterlife messages to posthumously share with loved ones.

"Right now, as it stands ahead of this app, end-of-life planning is really challenging. It's this daunting thing you have to sit down and do at your computer," says Cisek. Not only is it "daunting," but it's time-consuming. According to The Postage, families can expect to spend nearly 500 hours on completing end-of-life details if there is no planning done in advance.

With more than 74 percent of The Postage's web traffic coming from mobile users, an app was a natural progression. In fact, Entrepreneur reports the average person will spend nine years on their mobile device. Cisek wanted to meet users where they are at with a user-friendly app that includes the same features as the desktop website.

"What we wanted to do [with the app] is make it so easy to plan your life and the end of your life using one click — as easy as it was for posting and commenting on social media," explains Cisek. "People are so used to reflecting on those behaviors and clicking one button to add a picture ... we wanted to make it that simple," she continued.

Cisek and her team focused on providing a "seamless experience" within the app, which took approximately four months to build, which mirrors the desktop platform.

Though The Postage's website had mobile functionality, the app includes the ability to record and upload content. Whether snapping a picture of their insurance policy or recording a video to share with loved ones, The Postage app allows users to capture photos and videos directly within the app.

After snapping a picture, "the next step inherently is sharing it with your loved ones," says Cisek. Photos, family recipes and videos can easily be shared securely with loved ones who accept your invitation to The Postage so "that legacy continues on," she says.

Since The Postage's fall launch, the company has grown a steady base of paid subscribers with plans to expand.

"We're really starting to change the way people plan for the future," says Cisek.