hit the road

Self-driving delivery company with Houston pilots gets historic government approval for new model

Nuro is now able to roll out its new model of self-driving vehicles in Houston thanks to a recent announcement from the government. Photo courtesy of Nuro

A California-based tech company has got the green light today to move forward a new line of autonomous vehicles that will soon hit Houston streets.

Nuro, which has a few self-driving delivery pilot programs across Houston, has been granted its exemption petition from the United States Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. This move is a first for DOT, and it allows Nuro to roll out its vehicles on public roads without the features of traditional, passenger-carrying vehicles — like side mirrors or windshields, for instance.

"Since this is a low-speed self-driving delivery vehicle, certain features that the Department traditionally required – such as mirrors and windshield for vehicles carrying drivers – no longer make sense," says U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao in a news release.

Now, with this permission, Nuro has unveiled its newest model — the R2. The new model is more narrow than the R1, and has 65 percent more climate-controlled space for its food deliveries. The vehicle also has new safety features, like 360-degree vision using lidar, radar, and cameras and even has a pedestrian-protecting feature that enables the car to collapse on impact.

Image courtesy of Nuro

"We founded Nuro on the belief that we could reimagine, design, and develop an autonomous vehicle that would make the world a safer place," says Nuro co-founder and president, Dave Ferguson, in a release. "Our second-generation vehicle will advance our goal of transforming local commerce, and we are gratified that the Department of Transportation, under Secretary Chao's leadership, is promoting public safety and providing regulatory certainty for the self-driving industry."

The R2 models are being assembled in the U.S. with Nuro's partner, Roush Enterprises, which is based in Michigan. Per the NHTSA announcement, Nuro can deploy up to 5,000 R2 vehicles during the two-year exemption period. According to the DOT release, the organization will be monitoring Nuro's work throughout those two years.

"NHTSA is dedicated to facilitating the safe testing and deployment of advanced vehicle technologies, including innovative vehicle designs, which hold great promise for future safety improvements," says NHTSA Acting Administrator James Owens in the release. "As always, we will not hesitate to use defect authority to protect public safety as necessary."

Nuro currently has three pilot programs — all of which were announced last year. The company is working with Domino's, Kroger, and Walmart on food and grocery deliveries in six Houston ZIP codes. Since entering the Houston market, Nuro has been using its fleet of self-driving Prius vehicles to research and map the city's roads.

With this permission granted from DOT, Nuro can start making deliveries using its R2 fleet with its three retail and restaurant partners.

"Today's decision shows that 'exemption' can mean more safety," says Ferguson. "Our world-class team solved countless novel problems to create this design, and, after extensive modeling, research, and testing, created a vehicle unlike any other on the road today."

Photo courtesy of Nuro

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Building Houston

 
 

This year, 32 nonprofits providing essential services to Houstonians will receive grant funding from Houston Methodist. Photo courtesy of Houston Methodist

A Houston-area hospital system has announced the latest recipients of its grant program, benefiting nonprofits that are providing essential services to Houstonians.

Houston Methodist announced this month the 32 local nonprofit organizations receiving more than $6.8 million in community grants as a part of the Community Benefits Grant Program. This year, these nonprofits will give access to health care services to more than 188,000 individuals in underserved communities in the Greater Houston area.

“For three decades, the Houston Methodist Community Benefits Grant Program has helped create pathways to care for some of the most vulnerable in the Greater Houston community who often are struggling to afford basic necessities,” says Ryane Jackson, vice president of community benefits at Houston Methodist, in a news release.

Since the program's inception, it's provided $168 million to 82 local charities.

“Access to high quality health care is one of many issues that our community faces, and this grant helps makes much-needed health care resources affordable and accessible," she continues. "I’m proud that we can continue to partner with local organizations focused on expanding the health and well-being of all Houstonians.”

Houston Methodist announced the full list of this year’s Community Benefits grant awardees online.

Last year, Houston Methodist announced grants to 59 Houston-area nonprofit organizations totalling more than $4.6 million thanks to the Houston Methodist Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Grant Program.

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