Startup city

Houston named one of the fastest growing metros for tech startups

Houston has seen an almost 150 percent increase of tech startups over the past decade. Nick Bee/Pexels

Houston has seen an influx of new startups entering the market — and that growth hasn't gone unnoticed.

A new study from New York-based Center for an Urban Future analyzed Crunchbase data to find 17 cities have have had the most percentage of growth in startup activity. While Houston ranked last on the list, the city's numbers speak for themselves.

In 2008, Crunchbase's data reflects that Houston only had 567 startups, and, by 2018, that figure had increased to 1,409, representing a 149 percent growth. It's worth noting that Crunchbase's data tracks tech startups in particular through various avenues of public and private reporting.

The study included a few other Texas cities that outranked Houston, including Dallas (223 percent growth), Austin (with 221 percent growth), and San Antonio (with 155 percent growth). While the percentage is larger, Dallas' number of startups —according to Crunchbase — is slightly lower than Houston's at 1,293.

Chart via the Center for an Urban Future

While indicative of Houston's growth, the study unintentionally omits non-tech startups or companies that haven't been entered into the Crunchbase system. The study also seems to recognize only Houston data, rather than the greater Houston area as a whole.

Meanwhile, the Greater Houston Partnership's data reflects that the greater Houston area added 11,700 firms between 2013 to 2018 — an average addition of 2,340 per year.

Last month, WalletHub found that Houston was the 13th best city to start a business. The study analyzed 19 key metrics — such as five-year business-survival rate and office-space affordability — to compare 100 cities in the U.S.

More recently, Houston grabbed the fifth spot on a new 2019-20 list of the 10 North American Cities of the Future produced by the fDi Intelligence division of the Financial Times. The ranking is based on data in five categories: Economic potential, business friendliness, human capital and lifestyle, cost effectiveness, and connectivity.

To Susan Davenport, senior vice president of economic development at the Greater Houston Partnership, the results of the study make a lot of sense. Houston's diversity and friendly business climate are prime.

"Houston's future is a bright one," Davenport says in a previous InnovationMap article. "Our young and well-educated workforce, coupled with targeted infrastructure investments, will help us become a hub for innovation in the years ahead."

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Building Houston

 
 

Some 49 percent of Houston workers are burned out at work. Getty Images

Local workers who're especially dreading that commute or cracking open the laptop in the morning aren't alone. A new study reveals that nearly half of Houston laborers are more burned out on the job.

Some 49 percent of Bayou City residents report to be burned out at work, according to employment industry website Robert Half. That's significantly higher than last year, when only 37 percent reported burnout in a similar poll.

Meanwhile, more than one in four Houston workers (28 percent) say that they will not unplug from work when taking time off this summer.

Not surprisingly, American workers are ready for a vacation. Per a press release, the research also reveals:

  • One in four workers lost or gave up paid time off in 2020
  • One in three plans to take more than three weeks of vacation time this year

Elsewhere in Texas, the burnout is real. In Dallas, 50 percent of workers report serious burnout. More than a quarter — 26 percent — of Dallasites fear they won't disconnect from the office during summer vacation.

In fun-filled Austin, 45 percent of the workforce complain of burnout. Some 32 percent of Austinites feel they can unplug from work during the summer.

Fortunately for us, the most burned-out city in the U.S. isn't in the Lone Star State. That dubious title goes to the poor city of Charlotte, North Carolina, where 55 percent of laborers are truly worn out.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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