Startup city

Houston named a top city to start a business

Startups fair well in Houston, a new study finds. Photo by Zview/Getty Images

Ten percent of the United States workforce — 15.3 million people — work for themselves, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In honor of National Small Business Week, a recent study sought out the best cities for starting a business, and Houston came in at No. 13.

WalletHub, a personal financial website, used 19 key metrics — such as five-year business-survival rate and office-space affordability — to compare 100 cities in the U.S.

Houston ranked highest in the business environment category with a No. 4 ranking. This ranking considered startups per capita, average growth of business revenue, length of an average work week, etc.

The other two rankings were access to resources and business costs. For those, Houston ranked No. 55 and No. 67, respectively.

The population of Houstonians starting new companies is growing every year. According to the Greater Houston Partnership's data, the greater Houston area added 11,700 firms between 2013 to 2018 — an average addition of 2,340 per year.

Aside from the unclassified new businesses starting up in Houston, the most popular industries for new companies are restaurants, individual and family services, and computer systems design and related services, per the GHP. Within computer systems alone, the region added almost 700 new companies over the past five years.

In a city named the most diverse in the country, about one-third (31.6 percent) of all Houston firms are minority-owned, according to the GHP. Asians own 17.6 per­cent, Hispanics 10.1 percent, Blacks 3.5 percent, and Native Americans, Hawaiians and other groups 0.4 percent. Houston was recently ranked as a top city for minority entrepreneurial success.

Meanwhile, one in five firms (20.5 percent) is female-owned — one in seven (13.8 percent) is equally male/female-owned. While the data varies slightly, another recent study found that Houston had the 7th most startups with female owners.

Perhaps most telling for the WalletHub's findings is that the GHP reports that nearly two-thirds (63.6 percent) of all Houston em­ployers have been in business six years or more.

Texas, which was recently named the top state for female entrepreneurs, fared well overall in the WalletHub study, with seven cities in the top 20. Here's how the rest of the state ranked:

  • Austin came in at No. 4
  • Fort Worth took the No. 11 spot
  • Dallas secured the No. 15 rank
  • San Antonio ranked at No. 16
  • Irving came in at No. 17
  • Laredo was named No. 18
  • Lubbock missed the top 20, but took the No. 23 spot

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Building Houston

 
 

Fluence Analytics has exited to a multinational Japanese engineering and software giant. Image via FluenceAnalytics.com

A Houston company that provides analytics solutions within the chemicals industry has exited to a Japanese company.

Yokogawa acquired Fluence Analytics Inc. in a deal announced today. The terms of the deal were not disclosed and, effective immediately, the company operate as Yokogawa Fluence Analytics. Jay Manouchehri, who joined the company in 2022, will continue to serve as CEO of the entity.

“Combining forces with Yokogawa Electric enables us to capture the full value of our unique data sets, and we can't wait to deliver this added value to our customers," Manouchehri says in a news release. "Together, we will enable autonomous operations and digital transformation in the polymer and biopharma industries."

Founded in 2012 in New Orleans, Fluence Analytics moved to Houston in 2021 following a $7.5 million venture capital raise led by Yokogawa Electric Corp., which has its North American headquarters in Sugar Land.

The company's technology — automatic continuous online monitoring of polymerizations (ACOMP) product — provides real-time analytics solutions to polymer and biopharmaceutical companies worldwide. According to the company, its ACOMP product is the only commercially available system that can measure and analyze multiple polymer properties in real time, which leads to an improved system and less energy consumption and waste.

“Polymers are used in nearly every aspect of modern society in the form of plastics, rubber, paint, and so on," says Kenji Hasegawa, a Yokogawa Electric vice president and head of the Yokogawa Products Headquarters, in the release. "Combining Fluence Analytics' ACOMP system and other technology with our industry know-how will enable us to work with our customers to digitalize and automate polymerization processes that are currently monitored and adjusted manually.

"This will assist customers to improve worker safety, profitability, and environmental performance. We also plan to apply this technology to polymer re-use. We believe this is truly a game-changer for the industry,” he continues.

Fluence Analytics offices in Stafford, just southwest of Houston and has a team of 25 employees. Last fall, Fluence Analytics won in the Hardtech Category of the Houston Innovation Awards.

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