Love as a science

Houston DNA-based dating app expands brand and plans new ways to use its technology

Brittany Barreto wants to expand her DNA dating technology to a B-to-B model and compatibility test — all under a new company called X&Y Technologies. Karla Martin/Pheramor

For over two years, Brittany Barreto has been playing matchmaker with her DNA-based dating app, Pheramor, but now she's ready to take it to the next level.

Pheramor, which sequences users' DNA and datamines their social media activity to determine compatibility, is transforming into becoming a product of a newly formed company called X&Y Technologies. The company, Barreto says, will have multiple products, all relating to using that same DNA technology Pheramor has perfected.

Among the first three products X&Y is working to create is a B-to-B software-as-a-service company, where established dating companies can employ Pheramor's technology for its existing app and customers. Barreto says she has two letters of intent for the B-to-B model, one of which is a dating app with 160,000 users.

Barreto unveiled the new company at The Cannon's female entrepreneur pitch night on January 24, but expanding her technology's reach has been on her mind for a while. She cited major dating companies that have their eyes on DNA dating, but haven't yet figured out the infrastructure. That, she says, is where X&Y's SaaS model comes in.

"Our traction with the dating app was a fantastic way to prove that we are the thought leaders, we have the infrastructure, and we have the algorithm and we've proven that the market is ready to buy a DNA kit to find love," she says in her pitch.

In addition, X&Y will have a compatibility test for couples wishing to learn of their own DNA-based compatibility. The tool, called We Have Chemistry, is getting ready to launch and already has preorders coming in.

"Pheramor's test is really the gold standard and industry leader in this test," she says, explaining how Pheramor's technology can be used by these existing dating apps.

She talked about how this is the time for DNA tests — from 23andme to Pheramor — and how it's not weird to send your spit in the mail. As Barreto says in her pitch, there's so much more potential for uses of the technology in what's called contextualized genetics.

"I know that my technology is way bigger than just this one market," Barreto says. "I believe the future of product is about combining the big data of genomics and DNA with the big data of your digital footprint. Nobody has ever combined your Facebook data with your DNA to figure out what's the best diet, exercise or work environment for you."

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Building Houston

 
 

The HX Venture Fund has grown its portfolio of venture capital firms with its latest investments. Getty Images

The HX Venture Fund, which invests in out-of-town venture capital funds that have their eyes on Houston startups, has grown its portfolio.

The fund of funds now has a portfolio of 10 VCs from across the country, across industries, and across startup stages. According to a recent announcement, the HX Venture Fund has invested in New York-based Greycroft Venture Partners and Washington D.C.-based Revolution Ventures. The announcement also included Boston-based Material Impact and San Francisco-based venBio Global Strategic Fund, however those had been previously reported by InnovationMap.

"We are delighted to partner with the general partners of Greycroft Venture Partners, Material Impact, Revolution Ventures, and venBio Global Strategic Fund," says Sandy Guitar, managing director of HX Venture Fund, in the release. "With their proven expertise and exceptional track records, we are excited to integrate them into Houston networks and not only give them access to the Fund's innovative corporate limited partners, but also harness their knowledge to empower Houston entrepreneurs."

These four VC funds join six others that HXVF has invested in: Austin-based LiveOak Venture Partners and Next Coast Ventures, Washington D.C.-based Updata Partners, Chicago-based Baird Capital, and Boston-based .406 Ventures and OpenView Venture Partners.

"The receptivity of the HX Venture Fund model has exceeded all our expectations. Since early 2019, over 217 venture capital funds across the U.S. have expressed definitive interest in participating in our model," says Guillermo Borda, managing director of HX Venture Fund, in the release.

"It is especially noteworthy that collectively, the ten funds selected for HX Venture Fund's portfolio have $3.7 billion in committed capital in their funds to be invested with Houston on their investment radar," Borda adds. "This is at a time that provides compelling investment opportunities in the economic cycle. This is an exciting time for Houston entrepreneurs and our innovation ecosystem."

Guitar previously told InnovationMap that she's looking to curate a portfolio of VCs that is diverse in industries and stage. Additionally, before investing in a VC, the HX Venture Fund looks for an interest in investing into Houston startups. The hope is that, while not required, the HXVF portfolio funds invest in a Houston startup down the road. Earlier this year, Houston-based Liongard became the fund of funds' first example of that.

"The innovation and talent in Houston are best-in-class; we want to be investing there," says Tige Savage, managing partner at Revolution Ventures, in the release.

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