Where to be

10+ can't-miss Houston business and innovation events for July

From enlightening talks to networking opportunities, here's where you need to be in July. Getty Images

If you were hoping that business events would slow down for the summer, keep hoping. While you're probably getting plenty of OOO emails during your daily communications, there's no shortage of face-to-face opportunities within Houston business and innovation.

If you know of innovation-focused events for this month or next, email me at natalie@innovationmap.com with the details and subscribe to our daily newsletter that sends fresh stories straight to your inboxes every morning.

July 3 — Is Venture Capital Right for My Business?

Venture Capital is a path that every startup has to evaluate. In this panel-led event the intent is to form a foundation for answering the question: "Is VC right for me?"

Details: The event is from noon to 1:30 pm on Wednesday, July 3 at Station Houston (1301 Fannin Street, #2440). Learn more.

July 10 — Smart Cities: How Smart is Houston?

The Center for Houston's Future presents this event with support from graduates of its Leadership Forum program and in partnership with Station Houston, City of Houston's Innovation Office, and Houston Exponential.

The City of Houston is using data and emerging technology to improve the quality of life for citizens, share information with the public, drive economic growth and build a more inclusive society. Two key Smart City initiatives will be discussed at the event, one focused on transportation and one focused on resiliency and sustainability.

Details: The event is from 7:30 to 9:30 am on Wednesday, July 10, at Station Houston (1301 Fannin Street, #2440). Learn more.

July 10 — Social Advertising 101: Training by The Black Sheep Agency

Learn the basics of Facebook and Instagram advertising as Black Sheep professionals walk through the best type of #ad for your campaign! The team will also talk you through formulating a budget, targeting your audience, optimizing your efforts, and other creative options to execute your social advertising needs.

Details: The event is from 5:30 to 7:30 pm on Wednesday, July 10, at Impact Hub Houston #PopHUB @HX (410 Pierce Street). Learn more.

July 11 — Startup Pains: What I Wish I Knew

This monthly series hosted by the University of Houston lets you learn from someone else's mistakes and successes. This month's speaker is Carlos Genty, CEO & CTO of Critical X Solutions.

Details: The event is from 4 to 5 pm on Thursday, July 11, at the UH Technology Bridge (Innovation Center, building 4, floor 2, 5000 Gulf Fwy). Learn more.

July 13 — Enventure Basecamp - Business Building Workshop

Basecamp is an inclusive environment for those who are interested in adapting their life science experiences to real business applications. All are welcome, and the event is free.

Details: The event is from 9 am to noon on Saturday, July 13, at the TMC Innovation Institute (2450 Holcombe Blvd). Learn more.

July 15 — Enventure Innovation Stories: Dan Harrington, PhD (Polyvascular)

Enventure welcomes Daniel Harrington, PhD for its Innovation Stories speaker series. Dr. Harrington is a co-founder and the chief scientific officer of Polyvascular, and an assistant professor at UTHealth.

Details: The event is from 6 to 8:30 pm on Monday, July 15, at the CUBIO Innovation Center (7707 Fannin St.). Learn more.

July 16 — Is My Idea Lucrative? A Small Business Success Series Workshop

Figure out if whether your business idea is crazy — or perhaps just crazy enough to work. Featured presenters include Ned Mueller, entrepreneur in residence at HCC Center for Entrepreneurship - Southeast, and Austin Tenette is a certified business coach with the Focal Point Coaching organization.

Details: The event is from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm on Tuesday, July 16, at the HCC Alief Hayes (2811 Hayes Road). Learn more.

July 16 — GCxN Clean Tech Start-up Pitch Competition

The Shell GameChanger AcceleratorTM Powered by NREL, GCxN, is a collaboration between Shell and the National Renewable Energy Lab to identify and advance the next generation of transformative energy technologies. GCxN addresses market gaps by providing clean tech startups with technical and business development support to move their technologies from early stage prototypes to commercially viable energy solutions.

Details: The event is from 3 to 8 pm on Tuesday, July 16, at Station Houston (1301 Fannin St., suite 2440). Learn more.

July 16 — Workshop: Mastering the Brain Dump to Reduce Business Frustrations

Christina Wright, founder of WrightNow Results, will guide you through her method to help you get clear on — and develop a plan for — your biggest challenges surrounding business and managing "it all."

Details: The event is from 5:30 to 7:30 pm on Tuesday, July 18, at Impact Hub Houston #PopHUB @HX (410 Pierce Street). Learn more.

July 17 — Fuckup Nights Houston

Failure is a part of any success story, but we don't talk about it enough. We've all been to plenty of events where people tell you how they hacked, hustled, and created their success, but very few where someone gets up and says "I totally messed up, and this is what you can learn from it."

Details: The event is from 6 to 8 pm on Wednesday, July 17, at TBA. Learn more.

July 18 — Chancellor’s Technology Bridging Fund 2019 Launch Event

In an effort to support the University of Houston's mission of building a thriving culture around innovation and entrepreneurship amongst its faculty, staff and students, Chancellor Renu Khator has allocated $2 million into launching the Chancellor's Technology Bridging Fund (CTBF). This five-year proof-of-concept program is aimed to help our faculty inventors move their technologies closer to commercialization. Goals for the CTBF include prototyping, creating industry partnerships, and preparing for further funding.


Details: The event is from 5 to 7 pm on Thursday, July 18, at the UH Innovation Center (UH Technology Bridge, Building 4, Floor 2, 5000 Gulf Fwy). Learn more.

July 18 — TMCx alpha Opening Event

TMC alpha provides a pathway for any innovator affiliated with a TMC member institution to find support for the development and commercialization of their idea or product. The program will run every third Thursday (apart from where this conflicts with another function/holiday/etc.) from noon to 5 PM. Lunch and parking validation will be available.

Details: The event is from noon to 5 pm on Thursday, July 18, at the TMC Innovation Institute (2450 Holcombe Blvd. Suite, X, TMCx17 Board room). Learn more.

July 22 — TMC Biodesign Info Session

Do you want to start your own healthcare company? The TMC Biodesign Fellowship is a one-year paid innovation program that unites the talents of innovators and entrepreneurs with diverse backgrounds to quickly bring breakthrough healthcare products to market.

Details: The event is from 5 to 7 pm on Monday, July 22, at the TMC Innovation Institute (2450 Holcombe Blvd). Learn more.

July 25 — Managing Your Sales Function

Startups with a direct sales model have to evolve from founders doing all the sales to managing a sales function. Since revenue generation is on the line, the stakes are high and the punishment for mistakes are even higher. This supplement to the quarterly Founders Academy boot camp focuses on establishing and effectively managing the sales function for an early stage company.

    Details: The event is from 2 to 4 pm on Thursday, July 25, at The Cannon (1334 Brittmoore Road). Learn more.

    July 30 — Open Project Night with Impact Hub Houston and Sketch City

    Connect and collaborate with real, passionate people who are working on projects, ventures, and collaborations to improve to the city of Houston. If you have an idea, are working on something, or are looking for ways to collaborate with people who are doing work at the intersection of innovation and impact this event is for you.

    Details: The event is from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, July 30, at The Black Sheep Agency (611 West 22nd Street). Learn more.

    Breakthrough research on metastatic breast cancer, a new way to turn toxic pollutants into valuable chemicals, and an evolved brain tumor chip are three cancer-fighting treatments coming out of Houston. Getty Inages

    Cancer remains to be one of the medical research community's huge focuses and challenges, and scientists in Houston are continuing to innovate new treatments and technologies to make an impact on cancer and its ripple effect.

    Three research projects coming out of Houston institutions are providing solutions in the fight against cancer — from ways to monitor treatment to eliminating cancer-causing chemicals in the first place.

    Baylor College of Medicine's breakthrough in breast cancer

    Photo via bcm.edu

    Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have unveiled a mechanism explains how "endocrine-resistant breast cancer acquires metastatic behavior," according to a news release from BCM. This research can be game changing for introducing new therapeutic strategies.

    The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and shows that hyperactive FOXA1 signaling — previously reported in endocrine-resistant metastatic breast cancer — can trigger genome-wide reprogramming that enhances resistance to treatment.

    "Working with breast cancer cell lines in the laboratory, we discovered that FOXA1 reprograms endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancer cells by turning on certain genes that were turned off before and turning off other genes," says Dr. Xiaoyong Fu, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology and part of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor, in the release.

    "The new gene expression program mimics an early embryonic developmental program that endow cancer cells with new capabilities, such as being able to migrate to other tissues and invade them aggressively, hallmarks of metastatic behavior."

    Patients whose cancer is considered metastatic — even ones that initially responded to treatment — tend to relapse and die due to the cancer's resistance to treatment. This research will allow for new conversations around therapeutic treatment that could work to eliminate metastatic cancer.

    University of Houston's evolved brain cancer chip

    Photo via uh.edu

    A biomedical research team at the University of Houston has made improvements on its microfluidic brain cancer chip. The Akay Lab's new chip "allows multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response for patients with glioblastoma," according to a UH news release. GBM is the most common malignant brain tumor and makes up half of all cases. Patients with GBM have a five-year survival rate of only 5.6 percent.

    "The new chip generates tumor spheroids, or clusters, and provides large-scale assessments on the response of these GBM tumor cells to various concentrations and combinations of drugs. This platform could optimize the use of rare tumor samples derived from GBM patients to provide valuable insight on the tumor growth and responses to drug therapies," says Metin Akay, John S. Dunn Endowed Chair Professor of Biomedical Engineering and department chair, in the release.

    Akay's team published a paper in the inaugural issue of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society's Open Journal of Engineering in Medicine and Biology. The report explains how the technology is able to quickly assess how well a cancer drug is improving its patients' health.

    "When we can tell the doctor that the patient needs a combination of drugs and the exact proportion of each, this is precision medicine," Akay explains in the release.

    Rice University's pollution transformation technology

    Photo via rice.edu

    Rice University engineers have developed a way to get rid of cancer-causing pollutants in water and transform them into valuable chemicals. A team lead by Michael Wong and Thomas Senftle has created this new catalyst that turns nitrate into ammonia. The study was published in the journal ACS Catalysis.

    "Agricultural fertilizer runoff is contaminating ground and surface water, which causes ecological effects such as algae blooms as well as significant adverse effects for humans, including cancer, hypertension and developmental issues in babies," says Wong, professor and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in Rice's Brown School of Engineering, in a news release. "I've been very curious about nitrogen chemistry, especially if I can design materials that clean water of nitrogen compounds like nitrites and nitrates."

    The ability to transform these chemicals into ammonia is crucial because ammonia-based fertilizers are used for global food supplies and the traditional method of creating ammonia is energy intensive. Not only does this process eliminate that energy usage, but it's ridding the contaminated water of toxic chemicals.

    "I'm excited about removing nitrite, forming ammonia and hydrazine, as well as the chemistry that we figured out about how all this happens," Wong says in the release. "The most important takeaway is that we learned how to clean water in a simpler way and created chemicals that are more valuable than the waste stream."