that x-factor

TMCx names 19 startups to be considered for 2020 cohort

TMCx will select its 2020 cohort from the 19 startups it has invited to attend a bootcamp this month. Courtesy of TMC

The Texas Medical Center is one step closer to narrowing down its next TMCx cohort. It will be the first group of startups for the accelerator following an overhaul and redesign of the program that was announced last year.

TMCx has identified 19 companies from around the world to attend a two-week bootcamp within the TMC. At the conclusion of the two weeks, TMCx will select its 2020 cohort, which will then go through a six-month accelerator program.

While TMCx has been accelerating digital health and medical device startups for five years, this is the first year the program has taken this approach. The TMCx team first announced these changes on its last demo day in November. The program redesign was put into motion in order to find startups and technologies that solve the problems and challenges that TMC institutions face.

"The TMCx team is razor-focused on ensuring X companies find a landing spot here in the TMC," says Lance Black, associate director at TMCx. "Our north star metric is agreements between the startup and the member institution. With this as our determiner of success, we need to be intimately familiar with not only what the startups are doing but with what our hospitals need."

The TMCx team selected this batch of 19 startups based on their ability to hit the ground running at TMC, Black explains, and the two-week bootcamp will be filled with customer meetings, in-hospital exploration, social events, and educational programming.

"From these bootcamp participants, we are looking for companies who are ready to have meaningful conversations with their customers on day 1," Black says. "The access to enterprise health systems here in Houston is like no other place in the world, so TMCx is focused on curating these conversations and subsequent relationships so our member institutions are truly able to remain cutting edge."

Ultimately, Black says, his team is looking for the companies ready to "show up" for the TMC's member institutions.

"One of the most exciting aspects of TMCx's new phase is how we are now working hand-in-hand with the offices of innovation and internal champions of our member institutions to investigate needs and scour the globe for the best solutions," Black explains. "This community is one of collaborators and TMCx is a proud partner in improving the quality of life for patients."

Here are the health tech startups participating in the TMCx bootcamp this month:

  • San Francisco-based Atlas Health connects patients with payment resources.
  • Austin-based CareStarter automates and scales care management.
  • Houston-based CaseCtrl is a surgical case management platform.
  • San Francisco-based DeepScribe is an autonomous medical scribe.
  • Austin-based Diligent Robotics created a clinical robot assistant.
  • Los Angeles-based Elly allows users to live healthier through positivity.
  • San Francisco-based Ferrum reduces preventable medical errors.
  • San Antonio-base GaitIQ evaluates gait in primary care.
  • Toronto-based HelpWear is a clinical grade wearable heart monitor.
  • Pessac, France-based inHEART combines imaging and electrocardiology technologies.
  • London-based Lantum is a total workforce solution for healthcare.
  • Denver-based Manatee has created connected, everyday therapy for kids.
  • Cupertino, California-based Pyrames is a continuous, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring system.
  • Copenhagen-based Radiobotics automates analysis of routine medical X-rays.
  • Philadelphia-based Repisodic is a discharge planning solution.
  • Evanston, Illinois-based Rheos is a wearable shunt monitor.
  • College Station-based Solenic Medical eliminates biofilm on metallic implants.
  • Melbourne-based TALi can assess and strengthen attention in early childhood.
  • New York-based Yosi is creating the waiting room of the future.

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Building Houston

 
 

From biomolecular research to oral cancer immunotherapy, here are three research projects to watch out for in Houston. Photo via Getty Images

Research, perhaps now more than ever, is crucial to expanding and growing innovation in Houston — and it's happening across the city right under our noses.

In InnovationMap's latest roundup of research news, a couple local scientists are honored by awards while another duo of specialists tackle a new project.

University of Houston professor recognized with award

Mehmet Orman of UH has been selected to receive an award for his research on persister cells. Photo via UH.edu

Mehmet Orman, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering has been honored with a Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation. The award comes with a $500,000 grant to study persister cells — cells that go dormant and then become tolerant to extraordinary levels of antibiotics.

"Nearly all bacterial cultures contain a small population of persister cells," says Orman in a news release. "Persisters are thought to be responsible for recurring chronic infections such as those of the urinary tract and for creating drug-resistant mutants."

Previously, Orman developed the first methods to directly measure the metabolism of persister cells. He also developed cell sorting strategies to segregate persisters from highly heterogeneous bacterial cell populations, and, according to the release, he will be using his methods in the NSF research project.

Houston researchers collaborate on oral cancer innovation

Dr. Simon Young of UTHealth and Jeffrey Hartgerink of Rice University are working on a new use for an innovative gel they developed. Photo via Rice.edu

Two Houston researchers — chemist and bioengineer Jeffrey Hartgerink at Rice University and Dr. Simon Young at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston — have again teamed up to advance their previous development of a sophisticated hydrogel called STINGel. This time, they are using it to destroy oral cancer tumors.

SynerGel combines a pair of antitumor agents into a gel that can be injected directly into tumors. Once there, the gel controls the release of its cargo to not only trigger cells' immune response but also to remove other suppressive immune cells from the tumor's microenvironment. The duo reported on the technology in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

SynerGel, combines a pair of antitumor agents into a gel that can be injected directly into tumors, where they not only control the release of the drugs but also remove suppressive immune cells from the tumor's microenvironment.

"We are really excited about this new material," Hartgerink says in a news release. "SynerGel is formulated from a specially synthesized peptide which itself acts as an enzyme inhibitor, but it also assembles into a nanofibrous gel that can entrap and release other drugs in a controlled fashion.

In 2018, the pair published research on the use of a multidomain peptide gel — the original STINGel — to deliver ADU-S100, an immunotherapy drug from a class of "stimulator of interferon gene (STING) agonists."

The research is supported by the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Welch Foundation, the National Science Foundation and the Mexican National Council for Science and Technology.

Texas Heart Institute researcher honored by national organization

Dr. James Martin of Texas Heart Institute has been named a senior member of the National Academy of Inventors. Photo courtesy of THI

The National Academy of Inventors have named Houston-based Texas Heart Institute's Dr. James Martin, director of the Cardiomyocyte Renewal Lab, a senior member.

Martin is an internationally recognized developmental and regenerative biologist and his research is focused on understanding how signaling pathways are related to development and tissue regeneration.

"Dr. Martin has long been a steward of scientific advancement and has proven to be a tremendous asset to the Texas Heart Institute and to its Cardiomyocyte Renewal Lab through his efforts to translate fundamental biological discoveries in cardiac development and disease into novel treatment strategies for cardiac regeneration," says Dr. Darren Woodside, vice president for research at THI, in a news release. "Everyone at the Texas Heart Institute is thrilled for Dr. Martin, whose induction into the NAI as a Senior Member is well-deserved."

Martin has authored over 170 peer-reviewed papers in top journals he holds nine U.S. patents and applications, including one provisional application, all of which have been licensed to Yap Therapeutics, a company he co-founded.

The full list of incoming NAI Senior Members, which includes three professionals from the University of Houston, is available on the NAI website.

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