San Jacinto College celebrated the grand opening of its EDGE Center in the Houston Spaceport. Photo courtesy of San Jacinto

A new facility focused on training the professionals who will build the future of aerospace has officially opened at the Houston Spaceport.

The San Jacinto College EDGE Center, which broke ground in July of 2019, finally celebrated its grand opening of the EDGE Center Friday, Oct. 1, with elected officials, community members, faculty, and staff. The center's opening celebration was previously delayed due to COVID-19.

"With this facility, we will inspire, innovate, and train the talent needed at the Houston Spaceport," says Chancellor Brenda Hellyer in a press release. "Our industry partners developed the program and defined the skills needed for these evolving careers. You can feel the passion and excitement as you walk through the training area."

EDGE is just one part of the 154 acres of development currently in the works at Ellington Airport. The full property includes 450 acres that will all eventually be developed. Students have been working out of the center for about a year now, and San Jacinto College is the official education training partner for the Houston Spaceport at Ellington Airport.

"This facility is at the epicenter of the Houston Spaceport," said Mario Diaz, director of aviation at Houston Airport System in the release. "This is where the next chapter of the rivalry to space will be written by the minds and hands of Houstonians for generations to come. The talent who will learn how to build towards the future of space exploration starts right here at the EDGE Center."

The facility offers five training programs, including aerospace structure technician, aerospace electrical technician, composite technician, industrial automation technician, and aerospace quality technician. The center also offers a drone program preparing individuals for FAA certifications as well as a drone flight class and a drone build class.

Intuitive Machines, a Houston-based space tech company, is based in the Houston Spaceport nearby EDGE and, according to the release, has had several of the program's first graduates work for his company as they develop the next lunar lander. One student, Cyrus Shy, took an internship and has already accepted a full-time technician position with the company.

"The impact this program and Intuitive Machines has had on my life has been overwhelmingly incredible," says Shy in the release. "It has changed the trajectory of my life. I work for a company that care about each other and work toward a common goal."

Intuitive Machines is upgrading its presence in the Houston Spaceport. Image courtesy of IM

Houston space tech company reveals details on its new $40M facility

landing in Hou

A Houston-based space tech company focused on sending the first American spacecraft to the Moon since NASA's Apollo program is planning on expanding its presence here on Earth too.

Intuitive Machines announced its plans to move from its current facility in the Houston Spaceport into a new 125,000-square-foot building on a 12.5-acre plot also in the Houston Spaceport.

"We grew up as a company alongside Spaceport Houston, and we continue to grow as Spaceport Houston grows," says IM President and CEO Steve Altemus in a news release. "My partners, Dr. Tim Crain and Dr. Kam Ghaffarian, and I chose Houston because of its diverse talent, rapidly growing innovation ecosystem, and deep-rooted connection to spaceflight.

"Houston is our home, a place surrounded by family, friends, and people of true grit," he continues. "Whether it is a flood, pandemic, or landing on the Moon, Space City does not back down from a challenge, and this building is Intuitive Machines accepting one of humanity's greatest challenges."

The transition to the new space is expected in 2023, while Intuitive Machines' Moon landing is planned for the first quarter of 2022. From then, the company begins an annual launch plan delivering both NASA and commercial payloads to the Moon.

"We are thrilled that Intuitive Machines has decided to further invest in the tremendous aerospace ecosystem at Houston Spaceport," Houston Airports Director of Aviation Mario Diaz says in the release. "I believe Intuitive Machines is a real-life Houston success story that hits to the core of Houston Spaceport's mission – to create a focal point for aerospace innovation with a cluster of aerospace companies that will lead the nation in the transition from a government-focused to a commercially- driven space program."

Recently, Collins Aerospace announced its plans to build a facility at the Houston Spaceport — with 10,000 square feet dedicated to startup acceleration. Image via collinsaerospace.com

Newly announced Houston Spaceport project to include a startup incubator

one small step for man

A major aerospace company recently announced its new campus at the Houston Spaceport — and the company is dedicating a chunk of the new space to startups.

Collins Aerospace — a Charlotte, North Carolina-based company owned by Raytheon Technologies — announced its plans to build a new eight-acre, 120,000-square-foot campus for human space-related activity. And of that new campus, 10,000 square feet will be dedicated to an incubator supporting aerospace startups.

The city of Houston approved the deal last week, and the company will receive up to $25.6 million in financing from Houston Airports for capital improvements, according to a news release.

"Collins Aerospace's new campus is yet another a game-changer for Houston as we position our region as one of the country's leading next-generation tech and aerospace hubs," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says in a statement. "We are leveraging Houston's many advantages, including our dynamic workforce, to fuel the future of aerospace— a potentially trillion-dollar, 21st-century commercial space economy."

At a recent virtual event for Houston Tech Rodeo, Jimmy Spence, senior business development specialist at the Houston Spaceport, says the campus will be space flight focused and even include manufacturing of communication parts. It's be a project that's been a long time coming, he says.

"We want to provide the space — no pun intended — for these companies that are starting, to get their feet under them, to collaborate with the folks who can help them out and really get them going," he says at the event.

It's not the first time Collins Aerospace has expanded in Houston. The company's West Houston office is reportedly at capacity.

"On behalf of Collins Aerospace, I would like to thank the City of Houston, Houston Airports and Bay Area Houston Economic Partnership for creating a robust business climate and for their strong support of this important expansion of our business," says Phil Jasper, president of Collins Aerospace's Mission Systems business unit, says in the release. "Building on our 40 years in the Houston community, this expansion will further strengthen collaboration with our customer to support spaceflight."

The new space, including the incubator, will allow for Collins Aerospace — and other corporate Houston Spaceport partners — to engage with startups and educational institutions to advance innovation.

"Collins Aerospace is a great fit at Houston Spaceport," Houston Airports Director Mario Diaz says in the release. "The partnership is a key element to realizing the importance of Houston Spaceport — a center for collaboration and innovation where the brightest minds in the world can lead us beyond the next frontier of space exploration."

The world's first commercial space station will be built in Space City. Image via axiomspace.com

First commercial space station on the planet to be built in Houston

space city news

Houston's Spaceport will be the place where the world's first commercial space station will be built, according to Mayor Sylvester Turner.

The announcement was made during a December 22 briefing, where Turner announced the partnership between the Houston Spaceport and Axiom Space.

"Our great city is known for taking on humankind's boldest challenges," Turner said. "In 2021, the Houston Spaceport will be the first headquarters for Axiom Space, a privately funded space enterprise."

According to Turner, Axiom Space will construct a 14-acre headquarters. The headquarters "will be the world's first free-flying internationally available private space station that will serve as humanity's central hub for research, manufacturing, and commerce," Turner said.

The partnership is expected to bring more than 1,000 high-paying jobs, from engineers to scientists, mathematicians, and machinists.

"This opportunity will energize our workforce, engage our communities, and dare our young students to look up, wonder, and dream," Turner said.

Houston Spaceport is the country's 10th commercially licensed Spaceport and located at Ellington Airport.

The Houston area has played a key role for decades in the future of aerospace aviation. The Federal Aviation Administration granted formal approval for the city of Houston to making Ellington a launch site for reusable launch vehicles in 2015.

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For more on this story, visit our news partner ABC13.

The new center will replace the current Houston Learning Center that opened in 1976. Image courtesy of FlightSafety

New flight simulator and training facility to land at Houston Spaceport

Space city news

A New York-based aviation company has announced plans for a Houston training center at Ellington Airport and the Houston Spaceport. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring.

FlightSafety International, which has training facilities around the world and provides over 1.4 million hours of aviation training each year, announced the new state-of-the-art Learning Center in Houston on October 21, but the company has long been connected to Houston. It hosts its annual Wings Over Houston Airshow from the airport currently.

"FlightSafety is proud to have been a member of the Houston business community since 1966. This new facility will replace the current Houston Learning Center, which opened in 1976," says David Davenport, president and CEO of the company, in a news release. "We appreciate the support received from the City of Houston for this new facility as we worked to develop and finalize a long-term ground lease agreement for a six acre area within Phase 1 of the Spaceport."

The Learning Center will have a dozen full flight simulators for various types of aircraft that can be used for training for everyone from pilots and flight attendants to aircraft maintenance technicians. According to the release, there will be a dedicated area for Pratt & Whitney Canada engines.

Along with the training center, FlightSafety announced an agreement it's entered into with an unidentified large commercial aircraft operator that will use a large portion of the facility.

"This agreement further demonstrates FlightSafety's ability to provide turnkey training services to commercial aircraft operators in facilities that meet their exact needs," added David Davenport.

Airports, spaceports, and carports — these three Houston innovators represent the city's future. Courtesy photos

3 Houston innovators to know this week

Who's who

This week's Houston innovators to keep an eye on are working on technologies that are true testaments to the day and age we live in. From commercial space travel to a product that protects vehicles from floodwaters that are more and more frequent, these entrepreneurs are providing solutions to problems no one even dreamed of having a few decades ago.

Mark Bergsrud, co-founder and CEO of Grab

Courtesy of Grab

For over 20 years, Mark Bergsrud worked at the intersection of travel and technology — first at Continental Airlines, then at United Airlines following the merger, and now for himself as the co-founder of Grab, a Houston startup that's making grabbing a bite at the airport way easier.

Grab's technology digitizes and optimizes the airport dining experience — from ordering pickup remotely ahead of time to kiosks or table tablet ordering. The company, which has operations in 37 airports, just closed a multimillion-dollar Series A fundraising round to help continue its growth.

"We've called ourselves a startup for a long time, and now we think of ourselves as more of a scale-up company," Bergsrud says. "Now it's about having the money to scale faster."

Read more about the company by clicking here.

Rahel Abraham, founder of ClimaGuard

Courtesy of ClimaGuard

For inventors, you can usually pinpoint a particular "eureka" moment. For Rahel Abraham, it was seeing her 2008 Infiniti G35 completely totaled by the rain waters of Hurricane Harvey. She knew there had to be some way to protect cars and valuables from flooding, so she invented ClimaGuard's Temporary Protective Enclosure.

Abraham, who was selected for the 12-week DivInc accelerator program in Austin for her company, wants to make the product available to everyone.

"My goal is not to make it to where it's an exclusive product — available only to those who can afford it — but I want to be able to help those who it would make even more of an economic impact for," Abraham says.

Read more about the company by clicking here.

Arturo Machuca, general manager of Ellington Airport and the Houston Spaceport

Arturo Machuca

Courtesy of the Houston Airport System

Arturo Machuca is playing a waiting game. Various companies are developing commercial spaceflight and — whether that technology delivers in two years or 10 years, Machuca wants Houston to be ready. Ellington Airport and the Houston Spaceport are being developed throughout a multiphase, multimillion-dollar process, while also serving as an active airport.

"We use what we already have at Ellington Airport," Machuca tells InnovationMap. "We're serving aviation today until commercial spaceflight gets here."

Read the full interview by clicking here.

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Greentown Labs hires former Houston sustainability exec

new hire

The country's largest climatetech startup incubator has made a strategic new hire.

Lara Cottingham is the new chief of staff for Greentown Labs, a Boston-area company that opened in Houston earlier this year. Cottingham previously served as the city of Houston's chief sustainability officer and the chief of staff for the city's Administration and Regulatory Affairs Department for the past seven years. In her new role, Cottingham will oversee the day-to-day operations and communications for Greentown's CEO Emily Reichert, along with key stakeholder engagements and strategic initiatives for the incubator.

"Lara brings a tremendous wealth of knowledge and experience to our team from her dynamic leadership role at the City of Houston," says Reichert in a news release. "Her breadth of knowledge in sustainability, climate, and the energy transition, and her expertise in regulatory and stakeholder aspects of the energy industry, will be incredibly valuable to our team and community."

Under her leadership at the city of Houston, Cottingham was the chief author of Houston's Climate Action Plan, an initiative aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Houston, and getting the city to a point where it meets the Paris Agreement goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. Cottingham helped the city move to 100 percent renewable electricity, according to the release, and helped turn a 240-acre landfill into the nation's largest urban solar farm.

"In leading the Climate Action Plan, Lara helped spark Houston's leadership in what has become a global energy transition and was a passionate advocate for climate action in Houston," says Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner in the release. "While she will be missed, this new role will only strengthen our partnership with Greentown. I look forward to working with Emily, Lara, and the Greentown team to meet our climate goals and make Houston the energy capital of the future."

Before her work at the city, Cottingham worked at Hill+Knowlton Strategies' Houston office range of clients across the energy sector. Earlier in her career, she served as communications director for two congressmen in the U.S. House of Representatives. She began her work with the city in 2014.

"In working with Mayor Turner and Climate Mayors across the U.S., I saw how important partnerships are to helping cities decarbonize," says Cottingham in the release. "There is no better partner or place for climate action at work than Greentown Labs. Greentown is 100 percent committed to attracting and nurturing the energy companies of the future and making Houston the energy transition capital of the world. I'm excited to join the team and see how climatetech can help cities reach their climate goals."

Greentown Labs first announced its entrance into the Houston market last summer. The new 40,000-square-foot facility in Midtown across the street from The Ion opened its prototyping and wet lab space, offices, and community gathering areas for about 50 startup companies opened in April. Greentown was founded in 2011 in Somerville, Massachusetts, and has supported more than 400 startups, which have raised more than $1.5 billion in funding.

Houston edtech nonprofit grows its technology with $440K grant from Kinder Foundation

student-focused

As the learning landscape shifted from in-person to virtual, the ability to provide students with necessary support systems and resources became compromised. However, one Houston edtech company worked hard to close that gap.

ProUnitas, a Houston-based nonprofit, partnered with Thoughtworks, a global technology consultancy, to expand its PurpleSENSE platform to mobile. This partnership was ensured through significant private investment, including a one-time gift of $440,000 from the Kinder Foundation.

ProUnitas promises that this expansion will allow student support teams to take the power of PurpleSENSE with them on the go for easier, real-time response using the new PurpleSENSE mobile app.

"A mobile version of PurpleSENSE will empower student support teams to work more rapidly, efficiently and effectively towards their mission and goals," Chris Murphy, CEO of Thoughtworks North America, says in a news release.

Committed to ensuring that no students fall through the cracks, ProUnitas' purpose is focused on providing all students, including those most impoverished, with support services such as food assistance programs, mental health counseling, and after-school clubs.

"Every day many of our students carry the burden of poverty on their shoulders to school, and despite the availability of services, schools do not have the technology infrastructure necessary to connect students to resources in a coordinated way. We want to change this reality," says Adeeb Barqawi, president and CEO of ProUnitas, says in the release.

Engaged in similar work, the Kinder Foundation was a natural partner.

"The Kinder Foundation believes that children cannot succeed if they are juggling significant personal challenges," says Nancy Kinder, president and CEO of the Kinder Foundation, in the release. "As a result of the pandemic, we are seeing mental health and the impact of stress with fresh eyes. Now is the time to support our children and help them thrive and learn. We are proud to help elevate the work of ProUnitas to reach more schools and more students in this critical time of need."

In a press release, ProUnitas states that through these new mobile capabilities, up to 60 percent of administrative work in providing social service options is eliminated. It also shortens the response time for a student to be identified and receive services by 90 percent.

The expansion of PurpleSENSE to mobile is a critical step for ProUnitas to effectively support more schools and students.

Renewables are Houston's next chapter, says this expert

guest column

Houston has long been known as an innovative city — from medicine to technology to creative cuisines (see Viet-Cajun). I am always proud to see how cultures, education, and change come together to build the fabric of our city. As we look forward to a new future, we need to look no further than one of our strongest industries: energy. As many before me, I've sat down to ask: What does that next chapter look like for Houston?

Renewable energy has rapidly grown in Texas and across the country. Emerging technology has furthered this innovation, bringing wind and solar projects that are more powerful and reliable online from the Panhandle to deep in the Rio Grande Valley. As these new projects come online, aging wind facilities built in the early 2000s are beginning to be revitalized, gleaming bright white with newer, longer blades. And, similar to cleaning out your closet of old clothes, the current blades have to go somewhere. Where others see a problem, we saw an opportunity: We've made a business out of recycling them.

At Everpoint, we are demolishing and removing blades all across the US, with projects in North Dakota, Colorado, and even here in another Texas city, Sweetwater. In this rural Texas town, wind investment took Nolan County market value from $607 million in 1998 to $3.2 billion as development peaked in 2009. This growth enabled the school districts, county, and hospital district to expand and upgrade their facilities. As a trailblazer in the industry, we worked closely with the Sweetwater team to handle a smooth transition, allowing their community to look forward to a breezier future.

The industry is quickly innovating to meet the demands of Texas' future, and new opportunities are forming every day, something we're proud to be a part of, especially as a veteran-owned company. We are driven to make the future of energy more transparent and traceable, that's why we partner with firms like Media Sorcery which uses sensors and an ESG based blockchain built by another Houston firm, Topl, to maintain full accountability throughout the decommissioning process.

Beyond our company, the renewable energy industry employs veterans at a higher rate than the national average, with more than 11,000 in the wind industry alone. As a veteran myself it only made since to team with another veteran founded company to pursue this opportunity. I appreciate meeting fellow veterans every day that are applying the skills they learned in the military: a technical knowledge base, teamwork, and discipline.

Across Texas, renewable energy is powering 40,200 well-paying careers that I know are building toward a better, brighter Houston. It's in our blood to continue the Texas legacy of welcoming energy industries, like wind and solar, into our state. I believe in an all-energy approach to the energy transition. Renewable energy is about more than hearts and minds, it's about dollars and cents.

In honor of that, we are celebrating American Clean Power Week this week, October 25-29, and we hope you will join us. Not to celebrate one industry, but to embrace an all of the above, made in Texas energy future — a future that I know we can all be proud of, and where Houston will be the Energy Capital of the Future.

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Kevin Doffing is the chief commercial officer of Everpoint Services.