out of this world education

Houston university system cuts the ribbon on its spaceport training center

San Jacinto College celebrated the grand opening of its EDGE Center in the Houston Spaceport. Photo courtesy of San Jacinto

A new facility focused on training the professionals who will build the future of aerospace has officially opened at the Houston Spaceport.

The San Jacinto College EDGE Center, which broke ground in July of 2019, finally celebrated its grand opening of the EDGE Center Friday, Oct. 1, with elected officials, community members, faculty, and staff. The center's opening celebration was previously delayed due to COVID-19.

"With this facility, we will inspire, innovate, and train the talent needed at the Houston Spaceport," says Chancellor Brenda Hellyer in a press release. "Our industry partners developed the program and defined the skills needed for these evolving careers. You can feel the passion and excitement as you walk through the training area."

EDGE is just one part of the 154 acres of development currently in the works at Ellington Airport. The full property includes 450 acres that will all eventually be developed. Students have been working out of the center for about a year now, and San Jacinto College is the official education training partner for the Houston Spaceport at Ellington Airport.

"This facility is at the epicenter of the Houston Spaceport," said Mario Diaz, director of aviation at Houston Airport System in the release. "This is where the next chapter of the rivalry to space will be written by the minds and hands of Houstonians for generations to come. The talent who will learn how to build towards the future of space exploration starts right here at the EDGE Center."

The facility offers five training programs, including aerospace structure technician, aerospace electrical technician, composite technician, industrial automation technician, and aerospace quality technician. The center also offers a drone program preparing individuals for FAA certifications as well as a drone flight class and a drone build class.

Intuitive Machines, a Houston-based space tech company, is based in the Houston Spaceport nearby EDGE and, according to the release, has had several of the program's first graduates work for his company as they develop the next lunar lander. One student, Cyrus Shy, took an internship and has already accepted a full-time technician position with the company.

"The impact this program and Intuitive Machines has had on my life has been overwhelmingly incredible," says Shy in the release. "It has changed the trajectory of my life. I work for a company that care about each other and work toward a common goal."

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Building Houston

 
 

According to a new report, Houston's workforce isn't among the happiest in the nation. Photo via Getty Images

Call it the Bayou City Blues. A report from job website Lensa ranks Houston third among the U.S. cities with the unhappiest workers.

The report looks at four factors — vacation days taken, hours worked per week, average pay, and overall happiness — to determine the happiest and unhappiest cities for U.S. workers.

Lensa examined data for 30 major cities, including Dallas and San Antonio. Dallas appears at the top of the list of the cities with the unhappiest workers, and San Antonio lands at No. 8.

Minneapolis ranks first among the cities with the happiest workers.

Here's how Houston fared in the four ranking categories:

  • 16.6 million unused vacation days per year.
  • 40.1 average hours worked per week.
  • Median annual pay of $32,251.
  • Happiness score of out of 50.83.

Dallas had 19.4 million unused vacation days per year, 40.5 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $34,479, and a happiness score of 53.3 out of 100.

Meanwhile, San Antonio had 5.7 million unused vacation days per year, 39.2 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $25,894, and a happiness score of 48.61.

Texas tops Lensa's list of the states with the unhappiest workers.

"While the Lone Star State had a decent happiness score of 52.56 out of 100, it scored poorly on each of the other factors, with Texans allowing an incredible 67.1 million earned vacation days go to waste over the course of a year," Lensa says.

In terms of general happiness, Houston shows up at No. 123 on WalletHub's most recent list of the happiest U.S. cities. Dallas takes the No. 104 spot, and San Antonio lands at No. 141. Fremont, California, grabs the No. 1 ranking.

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