houston innovators podcast episode 169

Houston founder shares expansion plans for female-focused coworking

Stephanie Tsuru joins this week's Houston Innovators Podcast to share her growth plans for 2023. Photo via LinkedIn

Stephanie Tsuru didn't know much about coworking when she decided to jump headfirst into creating SheSpace.

On this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast, Tsuru, founder and CEO of SheSpace, explains that she saw an need for a place for women — entrepreneurs, independent contractors, remote workers, etc. — to congregate and collaborate. So, she filled that need.

"The idea wasn't about coworking — it was a place to bring women together so that they didn't have to sit by themselves in a coffee shop," she says on the show.

Tsuru opened the membership-based space with her daughter-in-law Katie in November of 2020, and has already expanded to support its growing membership. In August 2021, SheSpace added an additional 1,500 square feet. Now, the company has 250 women in its network, whether they rent a private office, hotdesk, or just attend for events — something Tsuru says was created based on interest from potential members.

"We had so many people who wanted to be a part of the community — so we started a social networking group," she says.

SheSpace was designed very intentionally, Tsuru explains on the podcast. Everything from the colors on the walls to the parking and surrounding retail access was intentional.

"Women have a lot of stuff on their plate," she says, explaining how SheSpace has a gas station, a grocery store, a nail salon, and more within the same retail property. "We don't get our stuff done in an office complex."

SheSpace has a busy year ahead. While the Heights-area location will be SheSpace's flagship and where programming will continue to be held, Tsuru says she has plans to open a satellite location to accommodate a growing membership and Houston's sprawl.

"We are looking at satellite areas for more offices, workspace, and meeting rooms," she says. "We'll make a decision and have a location this year."

She shares more about what she's accomplished with SheSpace in its first two years — as well as what's next on the podcast. Listen to the interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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Building Houston

 
 

Ben Jawdat, CEO and founder of Revterra, joins the Houston Innovators Podcast. Photo via LinkedIn

With more and more electric vehicles on the road, existing electrical grid infrastructure needs to be able to keep up. Houston-based Revterra has the technology to help.

"One of the challenges with electric vehicle adoption is we're going to need a lot of charging stations to quickly charge electric cars," Ben Jawdat, CEO and founder of Revterra, says on the Houston Innovators Podcast. "People are familiar with filling their gas tank in a few minutes, so an experience similar to that is what people are looking for."

To charge an EV in ten minutes is about 350 kilowatts of power, and, as Jawdat explains, if several of these charges are happening at the same time, it puts a tremendous strain on the electric grid. Building the infrastructure needed to support this type of charging would be a huge project, but Jawdat says he thought of a more turnkey solution.

Revterra created a kinetic energy storage system that enables rapid EV charging. The technology pulls from the grid, but at a slower, more manageable pace. Revterra's battery acts as an intermediary to store that energy until the consumer is ready to charge.

"It's an energy accumulator and a high-power energy discharger," Jawdat says, explaining that compared to an electrical chemical battery, which could be used to store energy for EVs, kinetic energy can be used more frequently and for faster charging.

Jawdat, who is a trained physicist with a PhD from the University of Houston and worked as a researcher at Rice University, says some of his challenges were receiving early funding and identifying customers willing to deploy his technology.

Last year, Revterra raised $6 million in a series A funding round. Norway’s Equinor Ventures led the round, with participation from Houston-based SCF Ventures. Previously, Revterra raised nearly $500,000 through a combination of angel investments and a National Science Foundation grant.

The funding has gone toward growing Revterra's team, including onboarding three new engineers with some jobs still open, Jawdat says. Additionally, Revterra is building out its new lab space and launching new pilot programs.

Ultimately, Revterra, an inaugural member of Greentown Houston, hopes to be a major player within the energy transition.

"We really want to be an enabling technology in the renewable energy transition," Jawdat says. "One part of that is facilitating the development of large-scale, high-power, fast-charging networks. But, beyond that, we see this technology as a potential solution in other areas related to the clean energy transition."

He shares more about what's next for Revterra on the podcast. Listen to the interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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