Cha-cha-changes

Station Houston announces its transition into becoming a nonprofit

Station Houston's stakeholders voted in favor of the organization transitioning to a nonprofit. Station Houston/Facebook

Houston's startup scene just got a little more accessible. Station Houston's stakeholders voted to transition the organization to nonprofit status from the C-corp status it currently holds.

The status change is effective January 1, 2019, for the acceleration hub, which is based in downtown Houston. The news was announced to its members in an email sent on December 13.

"Following in the footsteps of successful hubs such as 1871 in Chicago or Mass Challenge in Boston, we see that non-profit status allows these organizations to stay true to their missions while providing best-in-class services to members," reads the email. "We are excited to announce that this week, all Station stakeholders voted in favor of the conversion to non-profit status."

Station's CEO, Gabriella Rowe, tells InnovationMap that the announcement is part of a larger change for the organization, which will announce its plans for Station 3.0 in January.

"This opens up so many more funding and programing opportunities for us, so that we can charge our entrepreneurs and startups as little as possible and give them all the depth of services and support," Rowe says. "That's really what it comes down to."

Station Houston is among the partners — along with the Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship — for the Houston innovation district that plans to open in the rehabilitated Sears building in Midtown. The space plans to open in 2020 and hasn't yet broken ground. Rowe discussed Station 3.0 and the district in an interview with InnovationMap in November.

"We're going to be doing a huge launch of Station 3.0 in January," she said in the interview. "It will really allow us to tell the world not just what we're going to be for the next three months, but what we're going to be over the next three years."

Station Houston recently hosted the Texas Digital Summit with Rice University and the Rice Alliance. The all-day summit consisted of panel discussions, keynote speakers, and a startup pitch of 39 companies. At the conclusion of the day, Rowe and Brad Burke from Rice announced 10 of the most promising startups from the summit. You can read about those companies here.

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Building Houston

 
 

A Rice University team of engineers designed a low-cost ventilator, and now the device, which has been picked up for manufacturing, has received approval from the FDA. Photo courtesy of Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

A ventilator that was designed by a team at Rice University has received Emergency Use Authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The ApolloBVM was worked on March by students at Rice's Brown School of Engineering's Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen, or OEDK. The open-source plans were shared online so that those in need could have access to the life-saving technology. Since its upload, the ApolloBVM design has been downloaded by almost 3,000 registered participants in 115 countries.

"The COVID-19 pandemic pushed staff, students and clinical partners to complete a novel design for the ApolloBVM in the weeks following the initial local cases," says Maria Oden, a teaching professor of bioengineering at Rice and director of the OEDK, in the press release. "We are thrilled that the device has received FDA Emergency Use Authorization."

While development began in 2018 with a Houston emergency physician, Rohith Malya, Houston manufacturer Stewart & Stevenson Healthcare Technologies LLC, a subsidiary of Kirby Corporation that licensed ApolloBVM in April, has worked with the team to further manufacture the device into what it is today.

An enhanced version of the bag valve mask-based ventilator designed by Rice University engineers has won federal approval as an emergency resuscitator for use during the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo courtesy of Stewart & Stevenson

The Rice team worked out of OEDK throughout the spring and Stewart & Stevenson joined to support the effort along with manufacturing plants in Oklahoma City and Houston.

"The FDA authorization represents an important milestone achievement for the Apollo ABVM program," says Joe Reniers, president of Kirby Distribution and Services, in the release. "We can now commence manufacturing and distribution of this low-cost device to the front lines, providing health care professionals with a sturdy and portable ventilation device for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic."

Reniers continues, "It is a testimony to the flexibility of our people and our manufacturing facilities that we are able to readily utilize operations to support COVID-19 related need."

The device's name was selected as a tribute to Rice's history with NASA and President John F. Kennedy's now-famous speech kicking off the nation's efforts to go to the moon. It's meaningful to Matthew Wettergreen, one of the members of the design team.

"When a crisis hits, we use our skills to contribute solutions," Wettergreen previously told CultureMap. "If you can help, you should, and I'm proud that we're responding to the call."

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