game changers

Rice University students collaborate on COVID-19 solutions

Rice 360˚ Institute of Global Health's student innovators created projects and devices — from disinfecting devices and optimized intubation tools — that respond to challenges presented by COVID-19. Courtesy of Rice University

An annual program with Rice University and its partners in Africa had to do things differently in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only did operations have to shift to a virtual approach, but the projects themselves instead addressed the needs created by the disease.

Rice 360˚ Institute for Global Health, which collaborates with the Malawi University of Science and Technology (MUST) and the University of Malawi, The Polytechnic (Poly), continued their annual programming virtually over six weeks. The collaboration brings students together to solve global health issues, and this year's issue to address was overwhelmingly COVID-19.

"We had to give a lot of thought to whether we might have to cancel the program, and that was really heartbreaking to think about," says Rice 360˚ Director Rebecca Richards-Kortum, professor of bioengineering, in a news release. "Back in those days of late March and early April, I never really imagined how wonderful the virtual internship program could be."

Thirteen undergraduate interns and eight teaching assistants from Rice and Malawi, worked on six different projects, and three were presented in an online event on July 16. Here were the projects that were presented.

  • A disinfecting system that has the capability to sterilize multiple N95 masks at once. The system uses ultraviolet lights that can kill the coronavirus in around 30 minutes. Alternatively, the project included a smaller version that could be powered by solar energy. Yankholanga Pelewelo of MUST, Carolyn Gonawamba of Poly, and Andrew Abikhaled and Bhavya Gopinath of Rice developed the technology.
  • A walk-in decontamination unit that can decontaminate up to 3,000 people per day. The team of interns developed a prototype that consisted of PVC frame covered in plastic with nozzles to spray disinfectant. The project has already received interest from labs and hospitals for the device. Team members included Brenald Dzonzi of Poly, Mwayi Yellewa of MUST, and Kaitlyn Heintzelman, Krystal Cheung, and Sana Mohamed of Rice.
  • A redesigned intubation box that gives doctors better access to patients during the procedure. More than half of the 3,000 health care workers who have died from the coronavirus were doctors who focused on respiratory procedures, the team pointed out, and this daunting fact calls for redesigned tools. In total, the student innovators pitched three different designs that each included armholes in the sides, with a third hole on top to let a clinician or nurse assist with the procedure. The student team consisted of Chikumbutso Walani of Poly, Ruth Mtuwa of MUST, and Lauren Payne and Austin Hwang of Rice.

The other three projects included in the program but didn't present were designs for face shields, a hand sanitizer station and a contactless temperature monitor. All of the projects were led by teaching assistants Aubrey Chikunda and Chisomo Mukoka from MUST; Hannah Andersen, Nimisha Krishnaswamy, Alex Lammers and Ben Zaltsman of Rice; and Hope Chilunga and Francis Chilomo from Poly.

While pivoting the program to virtual comes with its challenges, Maria Oden — a professor of bioengineering, director of Rice's Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen and director of Rice 360˚ — recognizes the opportunities it provides as well.

"It would have been easy and understandable to cancel this internship, but that's not what happened, and look what the result was," Oden says in the release. "Over 90 people have tuned in to see the work of the interns. That's something we've never achieved with our in-person internships. We can learn from this experience."


Rice 360° Virtual Internship Highlights – Summer 2020 www.youtube.com

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

As of this week, Lara Cottingham is the chief of staff at Greentown Labs. Photo via LinkedIn

The country's largest climatetech startup incubator has made a strategic new hire.

Lara Cottingham is the new chief of staff for Greentown Labs, a Boston-area company that opened in Houston earlier this year. Cottingham previously served as the city of Houston's chief sustainability officer and the chief of staff for the city's Administration and Regulatory Affairs Department for the past seven years. In her new role, Cottingham will oversee the day-to-day operations and communications for Greentown's CEO Emily Reichert, along with key stakeholder engagements and strategic initiatives for the incubator.

"Lara brings a tremendous wealth of knowledge and experience to our team from her dynamic leadership role at the City of Houston," says Reichert in a news release. "Her breadth of knowledge in sustainability, climate, and the energy transition, and her expertise in regulatory and stakeholder aspects of the energy industry, will be incredibly valuable to our team and community."

Under her leadership at the city of Houston, Cottingham was the chief author of Houston's Climate Action Plan, an initiative aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Houston, and getting the city to a point where it meets the Paris Agreement goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. Cottingham helped the city move to 100 percent renewable electricity, according to the release, and helped turn a 240-acre landfill into the nation's largest urban solar farm.

"In leading the Climate Action Plan, Lara helped spark Houston's leadership in what has become a global energy transition and was a passionate advocate for climate action in Houston," says Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner in the release. "While she will be missed, this new role will only strengthen our partnership with Greentown. I look forward to working with Emily, Lara, and the Greentown team to meet our climate goals and make Houston the energy capital of the future."

Before her work at the city, Cottingham worked at Hill+Knowlton Strategies' Houston office range of clients across the energy sector. Earlier in her career, she served as communications director for two congressmen in the U.S. House of Representatives. She began her work with the city in 2014.

"In working with Mayor Turner and Climate Mayors across the U.S., I saw how important partnerships are to helping cities decarbonize," says Cottingham in the release. "There is no better partner or place for climate action at work than Greentown Labs. Greentown is 100 percent committed to attracting and nurturing the energy companies of the future and making Houston the energy transition capital of the world. I'm excited to join the team and see how climatetech can help cities reach their climate goals."

Greentown Labs first announced its entrance into the Houston market last summer. The new 40,000-square-foot facility in Midtown across the street from The Ion opened its prototyping and wet lab space, offices, and community gathering areas for about 50 startup companies opened in April. Greentown was founded in 2011 in Somerville, Massachusetts, and has supported more than 400 startups, which have raised more than $1.5 billion in funding.

Trending News