3 Houston tech companies land on Inc.'s list of the best places to work

These three Houston businesses rank as great workplaces. Photo via Getty Images

If you’re hunting for a new job, you might want to check out nine Austin-based companies that have been named among the best workplaces in the U.S.

On May 10, Inc. magazine released its 2022 list of the 475 best workplaces in the country, 22 of which are in Texas, including the nine in Austin.

After collecting data from thousands of submissions, Inc. chose honorees that best represented dedication to “redefining and enriching the workplace in the face of the pandemic,” says Scott Omelianuk, the magazine’s editor in chief.

“Not long ago, the term ‘best workplace’ would have conjured up images of open-office designs with stocked snack fridges,” says Omelianuk in a news release. “Yet given the widespread adoption of remote work, the concept of the workplace has shifted. This year, Inc. has recognized the organizations dedicated to redefining and enriching the workplace in the face of the pandemic.”

Each nominated company participated in an employee survey conducted by Quantum Workplace that touched on factors like management effectiveness, perks, employees’ professional growth, and company culture.

The three Houston-based winners are:

  • Liongard, a Houston-based provider of an IT automation platform
  • QTS, a Tomball-based provider of physical and electronic security services
  • WizeHire, a Houston-based provider of HR software

“We are honored to be recognized again as Best Place to Work by Inc. We have built an amazing team that has quickly accelerated our growth while continuing to rapidly improve our product and respond to our ever-improving understanding of our customers’ needs,” says Joe Alapat, Liongard founder and CEO, in a news release. “Our core values drive how we work and who we hire, and it’s the Liongard employees who guide our culture. We have an amazing team that shares the common goal of building something great – and that starts from the inside.”

Here are the other Texas companies that made the cut.

Dallas-Fort Worth

  • 5, an Irving-based energy advisory firm
  • Bestow, a Dallas-based life insurance company
  • Embark, a Dallas-based business advisory firm
  • Idea Grove, a Dallas-based marketing and PR firm
  • JB Warranties, an Argyle-based provider of HVAC and plumbing warranties
  • MB Group, a Plano-based accounting firm
  • The Power Group, a Dallas-based PR firm
  • The Vested Group, a Plano-based IT consulting company
  • TimelyMD, a Fort Worth-based telehealth company that focuses on students

Austin

  • Abilitie, a provider of virtual mini-MBAs and leadership simulations
  • Apty, a provider of web-based software for large companies
  • Cartograph, a consulting firm for brands in the organic and natural foods industry
  • Corvia, a provider of technology for the financial services industry
  • Homeward, a provider of financing for home purchases
  • INK Communications, a marketing and PR firm
  • Osano, a provider of data privacy software
  • Praetorian, a cybersecurity company
  • Scribe Media, a platform for self-published authors

Tyler

  • Education Advanced, a provider of education software
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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

BioBQ is working on technology to bring its lab-created, cell-cultured brisket to the market in 2023. Courtesy of BioBQ

Brisket, a barbecue staple in Texas, is as synonymous with the Lone Star State as the Alamo and oil wells. A Texas company recently recognized as the state’s most innovative startup wants to elevate this barbecue staple to a new high-tech level.

BioBQ is working on technology to bring its lab-created, cell-cultured brisket to the market in 2023. The Austin-based company made the Bloomberg news service’s new list of the 50 startups to watch in the U.S. — one startup for each state.

The co-founders of BioBQ are Austin native Katie Kam, a vegan with five college degrees (four from the University of Texas and one from Texas A&M University), and Janet Zoldan, a “hardcore carnivore” who’s a professor of biomedical engineering at UT. Kam is the CEO, and Zoldan is the chief science officer.

This kind of meat is genuine animal meat that’s produced by cultivating animal cells in a lab, according to the Good Food Institute.

“This production method eliminates the need to raise and farm animals for food. Cultivated meat is made of the same cell types arranged in the same or similar structure as animal tissues, thus replicating the sensory and nutritional profiles of conventional meat,” the institute says.

It turns that before becoming a vegan, Kam worked at the now-closed BB’s Smokehouse in Northwest Austin as a high school student. She’d chow down on sauce-slathered brisket and banana pudding during on-the-job breaks.

“But then over time, as I learned more about factory farming and could no longer make the distinction between my dogs and cats I loved and the animals that were on my plate, I decided to become vegan,” Kam writes on the BioBQ website.

Hearing about the 2013 rollout of the first cell-cultured hamburger set Kam off on her path toward starting BioBQ in 2018. Zoldan joined the startup as co-founder the following year.

Now, BioBQ aims to be the first company in the world to sell brisket and other barbecue meats, such as jerky, made from cultured cells rather than slaughtered animals.

According to BioBQ’s profile on the Crunchbase website, the startup relies on proprietary technology to efficiently produce meat products in weeks rather than the year or more it takes to raise and slaughter cattle. This process “allows control of meat content and taste, reduces environmental impacts of meat production, and takes BBQ to the next tasty, sustainable level consumers want,” the profile says.

In 2020, Texas Monthly writer Daniel Vaughn questioned BioBQ’s premise.

He wrote that “there is something about the idea of lab-grown brisket that keeps bothering me, and it has nothing to do with science fiction. If you could design any cut of beef from scratch, why choose one that’s so difficult to make delicious? Why not a whole steer’s worth of ribeyes?”

Kam offered a very entrepreneur-like response.

“I’m from Austin, and I know that brisket’s kind of a big deal here,” Kam told Vaughn. “It seemed like a great, challenging meat to demonstrate this technology working.”

Meanwhile, Zoldan came up with a more marketing-slanted reaction to Vaughn’s bewilderment.

“I don’t think cell-based meats will take over the market, but I think there’s a place for it on the market,” Zoldan she told Vaughn.

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This article originally ran on CultureMapCultureMap.

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