Real estate tech

Digital home buying and selling tool expands to Houston market

A growing digital home sales platform has moved into town. Courtesy photo

A Phoenix-based real estate company has expanded to the Houston market and opened a new office in town.

First launched in 2015, Offerpad is a tech-enabled home buying and selling solution. As of October, Offerpad had expanded to 534 cities with access to an estimated 6.7 million home-owning households.

The company is what's known as an iBuyer — a type of investor that uses automated valuation models, or AVMs, and other technology to quickly turn around offers on homes to sellers and then resell them to home buyers. The process tends to be quicker and higher tech than the normal home selling and buying process.

Offerpad previously had expanded into Dallas before launching in Houston on January 15. It's the first expansion in 2019 — a year that's poised to be full of growth for the company, the press release says.

"The company has a very concentrated vision to bring our real estate solutions to millions more people this year," Trent Capps, Offerpad's regional market director focused on Texas, says in the release. "Our start in Texas, with Dallas-Fort Worth, has far and away exceeded our expectations and we anticipate the same for our other Texas markets. In Houston, we began receiving home offer requests weeks ago, so we foresee huge success there, as well as in San Antonio later in the quarter."

The new local office is located in The Woodlands and serves 86 cities within the Houston area including Bellaire, Pearland, Sugar Land, Seabrook, and Friendswood. San Antonio is the next Texas market Offerpad is headed for.

"Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio are all cities we've had intentions of offering our service in," Founder and CEO Brian Bair says in the release. "I'm confident that Texans are going to value the solutions we've developed to the once complicated and stressful process of selling a home."

Graphic courtesy of Offerpad

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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