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Exclusive: Out-of-state venture firm specializing in research-based startups expands into Houston

A new venture development company has expanded into Houston with a Texas Medical Center office. Photo by Dwight C. Andrews/Greater Houston Convention and Visitors Bureau

For an Arkansas-based technology venture development firm that focuses on research-based companies coming out of universities, the Lone Star State was a tempting spot for expansion.

VIC Technology Venture Development has appointed James Y. Lancaster as the Texas branch manager. Lancaster, who lives in College Station, will oversee business there, in Dallas, and in Houston. Locally, he will work out of a TMC Innovation Institute office.

"I am excited to be working to TMC member institutions to provide a new avenue for commercializing their technologies, expanding on our fast start in Texas with an exciting opportunity in the Houston innovation ecosystem," Lancaster says in a release.

VIC specializes in taking university-founded research innovations to the marketplace by partnering with technology and business experts at every stage of the process.

The company already has a presence in Dallas with Dr. Ralph Henry, who is an entrepreneur in residence at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and also serves as VIC's vice president of life science and medical technology. VIC's first Texas portfolio company was Solenic Medical, which was brought on in February of this year.

According to the release, the company's presence in Houston might be similar to that of its arrangement in Dallas, focusing on leveraging the resources of the TMC.

"Our local presence will include new technology assessment and licensing, along with expanding our national investor network. Of course, the end goal is to have a string of startup company successes based on TMC inventions, as well as the potential to license technology from across the country into new companies located in Texas," Lancaster continues in the release.

Lancaster has over 25 years of experience across industries. Prior to VIC, he was the founder and managing director of the Innovate Family of Companies including Innovate CXO Services, Innovate Angel Funds, and Innovate BCS Development in College Station. He's also worked with and advised companies coming out of the Texas A&M University System for 12 years.

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Karl Ecklund, left, and Paul Padley of Rice University have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy to continue physics research on the universe. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Two Rice University physicists and professors have received a federal grant to continue research on dark matter in the universe.

Paul Padley and Karl Ecklund, professors of physics and astronomy at Rice, have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy for their research to continue the university's ongoing research at the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, a particle accelerator consisting of a 17-mile ring of superconducting magnets buried beneath Switzerland and France.

"With this grant we will be able to continue our investigations into the nature of the matter that comprises the universe, what the dark matter that permeates the universe is, and if there is physics beyond what we already know," Padley says in a press release.

This grant is a part of the DOE's $132 million in funding for high-energy physics research. The LHC has received a total of $4.5 million to date to continue this research. Most recently, Ecklund and Padley received a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to go toward updates to the LHC.

"High-energy physics research improves our understanding of the universe and is an essential element for maintaining America's leadership in science," says Paul Dabbar, undersecretary for science at the DOE, in the release. "These projects at 53 different institutions across our nation will advance efforts both in theory and through experiments that explore the subatomic world and study the cosmos. They will also support American scientists serving key roles in important international collaborations at institutions across our nation."

In 2012, Padley and his team discovered the Higgs boson, a feat that was extremely key to the continuance of exploring the Standard Model of particle physics. Since then, the physicists have been working hard to answer the many questions involved in studying physics and the universe.

"Over many decades, the particle physics group at Rice has been making fundamental contributions to our understanding of the basic building blocks of the universe," Padley says in the release. "With this grant we will be able to continue this long tradition of important work."

Paul Padley and his team as made important dark matter findings at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. Photo via rice.ed

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