software solutions

Houston tech startup offers free survey app to help companies manage COVID-19 response

A Houston software startup has created a communication tool and is allowing free access amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Getty Images

Keeping employees and employers connected is crucial during a crisis. A Houston-based software startup recognizes the importance of communication during the COVID-19 pandemic, providing its digital form and surveys app for free for six months.

Unvired Inc. recently unveiled its Digital Forms app to help employees voice their concerns and keep businesses with their finger on the pulse of employee morale. The survey is customizable for each business and contains questions with the most important factors such as employee health and well being, communication, confidence, and leadership.

"Digital Forms fits in with a whole new paradigm in the software world," says CEO Alok Pant. "It allows a business user to make their own specialized applications fast and easy with no coding necessary."

The low-code platform has a drag-and-drop form building feature to instantly deploy surveys, can store data in the Unvired Cloud, and instantly generate reports for insights in the administration portal.

The startup already has customers using it for their COVID-19 response, with users choosing to use it as a sort of information hub with frequently asked questions along with questions regarding employee and health wellbeing. While other companies use for surveying the number of masks and hand sanitizer supplies available.

The forms app, already in the works months before the virus changed the scope of daily life, will be officially launched in July.

"Digital Forms inadvertently became the perfect tool to easily build forms and create workflows during the time of the coronavirus pandemic," says Pant. "We wanted to help our community in any small way we can, so we saw offering this app for free as a great opportunity to help our business community."

Unvired, which is based out of Station Houston, has nationwide and international clients in a variety of different industries. According to Pant, Unvired's platform for surveys and customizable forms was first born out of their own customer's need for an app with form digitization capabilities.

"Many of our customers, especially in the oil field use many paper forms as part of their process," says Plant. "Our app is a very form-centric application that can serve our customers with automated digitization of forms, making it easier for employees to reduce manual data entry, enable real-time decision making, and lower operational costs."

This launch is only part of Unvired's new line of products. The startup is also releasing Chyme Bots, a digital communications solution that can be tailored to a specific business to answer frequently asked questions quickly and remotely.

"Many businesses will have to start to invest in digital in the near future," says Pant. "If they want to get out of the slump the pandemic has landed many businesses, digitization along with digital applications will be key to growth and efficiency."

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Building Houston

 
 

Houston-based Soliton can use its audio pulse technology to erase scars, cellulite, and tattoos. Photo via soliton.com

Soliton, a Houston-based technology company, is using audio pulses to make waves in the med-aesthetic industry.

The company, which is licensed from the University of Texas on behalf of MD Anderson, announced that it had received FDA approval earlier this month for its novel and proprietary technology that can reduce the appearance of cellulite.

MIT engineer and doctor Christopher Capelli first developed the basis of the tool while he led the Office of Technology Based Ventures at M.D. Anderson.

Capelli uncovered that he could remove tattoos more effectively by treating the skin with up to 100 waves per second (about five to 10 times greater than other devices on the market), giving birth to the company's proprietary Rapid Acoustic Pulse (RAP) platform.

In 2012 he formed Soliton with co-founder and entrepreneur Walter Klemp, who also founded Houston-based Moleculin, and later brought on Brad Hauser as CEO. By 2019, the company had received FDA approval for using the technology for tattoo removal.

"The original indication was tattoo removal, which is what Chris envisioned," Hauser says. "The sound wave can increase in speed whenever it hits a stiffer or denser material. And tattoo ink is denser, stiffer than the surrounding dermis. That allows a shearing effect of the sound wave to disrupt that tattoo ink and help clear tattoos."

According to Hauser, the team then turned to a second application for the technology in the short-term improvement in the appearance of cellulite. With the use of the technology, patients can undergo a relatively pain-free, 40- to 60-minute non-invasive session with no recovery time.

Brad Hauser is the CEO of Soliton. Photo courtesy of Soliton

"It works similarly in the fibrous septa, which are the tethered bands that create the dimples and cellulite and the uneven skin. Those are stiffer than the surrounding fat cells in the subcutaneous tissue," Hauser says. "That allows the technology to disrupt those fibrous septa and loosen and release the dimples."

In 2021 the company plans to commercialize their product and get it into the hands of dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and other medical professionals for 25 key accounts—potentially including ones Houston—with a plan for a national rollout in 2022.

And they don't plan to stop there.

The company has already announced a partnership for a proof-of-concept study with the U.S. Navy in which Soliton will aim to use its technology to reduce the visibility of fibrotic scars, and more importantly work to increase mobility or playability of scars.

"Often the scar ends up causing restrictions in motion and discomfort with pressure of even clothing and certainly with sleeping," Hauser says. "We believe based on the reduction in volume and the increase in playability that we saw in our original proof-of-concept study that we will be able to bring benefits to these military patients."

Work on the study is slated to begin in the first half of this year.

In the meantime, the company is making headway with treatment of liver fibrosis, announcing just this week that it's pre-clinical study in animals demonstrated positive results and a reduction in effects by 42 percent seven days after the completion of carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) induction. The RAP technology was also named the best new technology by the Aesthetic Industry Association earlier this month.

"It's really targeting collagen fiber and fibroblasts on a cellular level" Hauser says. "Which we think has numerous potential uses in the future."

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