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UH launches sales program with a special technology focus

The Sales Academy at the University of Houston is a eight-week program for graduates with an interest in technology sales. Photo via uh.edu

The University of Houston is looking to train the future workforce of technology sales with a new educational program.

The Sales Academy — an eight-week sales program that focuses on sales and lead generation skills for technology companies — is open to anyone who has a Bachelor's degree and an interest in technology and sales. The program aims to prepare its students for careers at startups and even large technology companies.

"We're designing this certification course to put people directly into a role that is extremely necessary for startups as they are growing and as their biggest investment needs to be in sales and lead generation roles," John Pingel, a Bauer College of Business professor who's behind the program, tells InnovationMap.

The idea for the program came out of the fact that tech companies are struggling to find employees with the skillset to sell and generate leads. Companies in Silicon Valley are finding it expensive and challenging to fill these sales roles, Pingel says, and Houston is an affordable city with tons of education opportunities.

"The city of Houston wants to attract new tech companies, and they also want to retain the companies that are starting up in town," Pingel says. "We want to play the role of sales talent."

The program, which launched its first class a week ago, will have 30 students in each class. Currently, Pingel says the program is looking for recent grads who maybe didn't find a job they are satisfied with their degree and are looking for a new path. The goal, Pingel says, is to run as many iterations per year as the organization can handle.

One of the most unique aspects of the program is its deferred tuition plan. Students can enroll in the program for free, and then The Sales Academy's team has 60 days after the program's completion to find the student a job. If the program can't place the student in time, the tuition is waived.

This initiative gives the students the financial freedom to develop new skills and start a new career. UH has seen success in the business school's Professional Excellence in Selling — a minor that prepares undergraduate students for sales position — that the school has run for 22 years. Pingel says that PES has a 98 percent placement rate for its students. Plus, The Sales Academy has worked all year to develop connections with companies interested in hiring students from the program.

"It's a risk, but it's still a calculated risk," Pingel says. "If we select the right student, and give them the right skills, that they are going to have the same type of success."

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Karl Ecklund, left, and Paul Padley of Rice University have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy to continue physics research on the universe. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Two Rice University physicists and professors have received a federal grant to continue research on dark matter in the universe.

Paul Padley and Karl Ecklund, professors of physics and astronomy at Rice, have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy for their research to continue the university's ongoing research at the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, a particle accelerator consisting of a 17-mile ring of superconducting magnets buried beneath Switzerland and France.

"With this grant we will be able to continue our investigations into the nature of the matter that comprises the universe, what the dark matter that permeates the universe is, and if there is physics beyond what we already know," Padley says in a press release.

This grant is a part of the DOE's $132 million in funding for high-energy physics research. The LHC has received a total of $4.5 million to date to continue this research. Most recently, Ecklund and Padley received a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to go toward updates to the LHC.

"High-energy physics research improves our understanding of the universe and is an essential element for maintaining America's leadership in science," says Paul Dabbar, undersecretary for science at the DOE, in the release. "These projects at 53 different institutions across our nation will advance efforts both in theory and through experiments that explore the subatomic world and study the cosmos. They will also support American scientists serving key roles in important international collaborations at institutions across our nation."

In 2012, Padley and his team discovered the Higgs boson, a feat that was extremely key to the continuance of exploring the Standard Model of particle physics. Since then, the physicists have been working hard to answer the many questions involved in studying physics and the universe.

"Over many decades, the particle physics group at Rice has been making fundamental contributions to our understanding of the basic building blocks of the universe," Padley says in the release. "With this grant we will be able to continue this long tradition of important work."

Paul Padley and his team as made important dark matter findings at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. Photo via rice.ed

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