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UH launches sales program with a special technology focus

The Sales Academy at the University of Houston is a eight-week program for graduates with an interest in technology sales. Photo via uh.edu

The University of Houston is looking to train the future workforce of technology sales with a new educational program.

The Sales Academy — an eight-week sales program that focuses on sales and lead generation skills for technology companies — is open to anyone who has a Bachelor's degree and an interest in technology and sales. The program aims to prepare its students for careers at startups and even large technology companies.

"We're designing this certification course to put people directly into a role that is extremely necessary for startups as they are growing and as their biggest investment needs to be in sales and lead generation roles," John Pingel, a Bauer College of Business professor who's behind the program, tells InnovationMap.

The idea for the program came out of the fact that tech companies are struggling to find employees with the skillset to sell and generate leads. Companies in Silicon Valley are finding it expensive and challenging to fill these sales roles, Pingel says, and Houston is an affordable city with tons of education opportunities.

"The city of Houston wants to attract new tech companies, and they also want to retain the companies that are starting up in town," Pingel says. "We want to play the role of sales talent."

The program, which launched its first class a week ago, will have 30 students in each class. Currently, Pingel says the program is looking for recent grads who maybe didn't find a job they are satisfied with their degree and are looking for a new path. The goal, Pingel says, is to run as many iterations per year as the organization can handle.

One of the most unique aspects of the program is its deferred tuition plan. Students can enroll in the program for free, and then The Sales Academy's team has 60 days after the program's completion to find the student a job. If the program can't place the student in time, the tuition is waived.

This initiative gives the students the financial freedom to develop new skills and start a new career. UH has seen success in the business school's Professional Excellence in Selling — a minor that prepares undergraduate students for sales position — that the school has run for 22 years. Pingel says that PES has a 98 percent placement rate for its students. Plus, The Sales Academy has worked all year to develop connections with companies interested in hiring students from the program.

"It's a risk, but it's still a calculated risk," Pingel says. "If we select the right student, and give them the right skills, that they are going to have the same type of success."

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Building Houston

 
 

A new report finds Houston a top city for business friendliness and connectivity. Photo via Getty Images

Houston, the future looks bright.

A new study from the fDi Intelligence division of the Financial Times places Houston at No. 7 among the top major cities of the future for 2021-22 across North, South, and Central America. Among major cities in the Americas, Houston appears at No. 3 for business friendliness and No. 4 for connectivity.

"Houston is known as one of the youngest, fastest-growing, and most diverse cities anywhere in the world. I am thrilled that we continue to be recognized for our thriving innovation ecosystem," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is quoted as saying in the fDi study.

Toronto leads the 2021-22 list of the top major cities in the Americas, followed by San Francisco, Montreal, Chicago, and Boston.

The rankings are based on data in five categories:

  • Economic potential
  • Business friendliness
  • Human capital and lifestyle
  • Cost effectiveness
  • Connectivity

Houston's no stranger to the list. Last year, the city ranked No. 3 on the same study, and in 2019, claimed the No. 5 spot.

"The fact that Houston consistently ranks among the top markets for foreign direct investment speaks to our region's connectivity and business-friendly environment," says Susan Davenport, chief economic development officer at the Greater Houston Partnership. "Many of the industry sectors we target for expansion and relocation in Houston are global in nature — from energy 2.0 and life sciences to aerospace and digital tech. The infrastructure and diverse workforce that make these prime growth sectors for us among domestic players are equally attractive to international companies looking to establish or strengthen ties in the Americas."

International trade is a cornerstone of the Houston area's economy. In 2020, the region recorded $129.5 billion in exports, according to the Greater Houston Partnership. China ranked as the region's top trading partner last year, followed by Mexico, Brazil, Korea, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Italy.

Houston's role as a hub for foreign trade and international business "is likely to support the region's economic recovery in the months and years ahead," the partnership noted in May.

"We talk often of Houston as a great global city — one that competes with the likes of London, Tokyo, São Paulo, and Beijing. But that's only possible because of our infrastructure — namely our port — and our connections around the world," Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the partnership, said last month. "Houston's ties abroad remain strong."

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