Houston voices

Here's what makes a startup stand out, according to University of Houston research

From pitching to value proposition, here's what you should be thinking about to make your company stand out. Miguel Tovar/University of Houston

During your pitch, investors will be looking to see what your startup's value proposition is. What can you offer that your competitors cannot?

Imagine if you will, your startup develops a watch that can detect when you're about to have a heart attack, and automatically sends an alert with your location to 911.

You've perfected the design and engineering intricacies of the device. It's ready to go out and save lives, and make you tons of money in the process.

Now imagine you can't get this product off the ground because your pitches keep falling flat. Investors don't have confidence in you as an entrepreneur, even if your product is amazing. Remember, you can have an awesome product, but you won't reap any rewards if that awesomeness cannot be expressed to financial gatekeepers.

That's where the art of the pitch matters. Pitching to a venture capitalist might be the most vital part of your startup's success. This is where you express how important your product is or how in demand your services are. This is where you convince investors your product (and you) is worth investing in.

Next, you'll have to determine your company's value proposition, which is the heart of your competitive advantage. This tells venture capitalists why they should invest in your company and not others.

Investors are putting their money and reputation on the line for your company. Their leap of faith has to be as educated as possible. If you can educate them very thoroughly why your startup is different, why it stands out from the rest, investors will feel much more comfortable with their decision to reject other bids in favor of yours.

You don't only need to convince them to choose your company, you also need to convince them that rejecting the other companies won't come back to bite them in the rear. Nobody likes to live with regret, least of all people who put themselves in a position to lose millions of their dollars on a bad decision. The best way to reaffirm an investor's faith in your company is to provide a product or service that is fairly new to the market. New products mean less saturation and higher demand, especially if the product solves a problem or provides a unique function.

There are plenty of toasters on the market, but what about wireless toasters? Outdoors-people everywhere would surely line up to buy that. You're providing a product of real value to a certain sect of people. Your competitive advantage is that your toaster is wireless and portable. That would be your company's value proposition to your investor.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea.

Rene Cantu is the writer and editor at UH Division of Research.

Choosing the right city in which to launch your startup can make or break your company. Miguel Tovar/University of Houston

Choosing the best city for your startup can mean the difference between success and closing up shop prematurely. It's important to think outside your home city for a startup launch because your home city may not have the ecosystem set up for your particular startup.

If you give in to your emotions; staying in your hometown because it's, well, your hometown, you risk preventing your company from launching in a city more conducive to its growth.

Here are three keys to making sure you choose the right city for your startup.

A city's ecosystem

Few things are more valuable to a new company than a web of like-minded companies, investors, social groups and connections. You want a city that uses its resources to grow and maintain its startups. Whether it be accelerators or pitching events or entrepreneur conferences, the city you choose needs to be active in the startup community. Establishing your startup in a city with a weak ecosystem will halt the growth of your company because it'll be that much harder to boost your company without a city's support.

A city's social network

A city with a robust social circle of like-minded entrepreneurs is a city that is doing something right for startups. First of all, if the city is rich in like-minded entrepreneurs, then that means they are living there. So there has to be a reason for that: the city is startup-friendly. Second, a city with a strong social sphere of startups means you have more opportunities to make connections and network. You can meet with other business owners to discuss issues important to your companies and even learn new things from each other. What's more is you have a chance to work with other companies to help each other grow. The city of New Orleans has Krewe de Nieux, for example. This social group is a resource for over forty technology startups in the city.

A chance to give back

Opportunities to give back. The best city for your startup will have plenty of opportunities to give back. For example, giving high school students real-life work experience to expand their knowledge and prepare them for a career in the field. A city with a plethora of opportunities like charities, youth groups, internships and career and business organizations allows startups to barter: we will give you experience and you can help us get work done. You help each other grow. In doing so, you blossom the city's startup community as a whole.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea.

Rene Cantu is the writer and editor at UH Division of Research.