Hang up to hang out

This Houston app wants to connect outdoor sports hobbyists with its new platform

A brother and sister team have created a digital tool to connect people on their outdoor adventures. Getty Images

Jeff Long had plenty of professional connections, but he struggled to find a network of people with similar outdoor hobbies.

"I'm a climber and I had no good way to meet other climbers," he says.

His sister, Sarah Long, had a similar problem when she was skiing at the Whistler Resort in British Columbia.

"I was alone and I was looking for people to ski with," she says. "So, I actually got on Tinder and made it a point to say, 'Not looking for a hookup, but if you're here and want to ski, so am I.'"

The siblings weren't alone in their dissatisfaction, and, within a few months of launching Axis Earth, the Houston-based app has over 1,500 users.

The app is part location finder, part social media channel and part professional networking tool. Designed for enthusiasts and professional athletes of individual sports (think: skiing, climbing, surfing, etc.), Axis Earth connects them with others in their area who share their interests, giving them running or climbing partners.

"We use information input by the users and geolocation software to find them the best connections," explained Jeff. "And our algorithm filters through what they've provided us about their interests and level of participation or competition so we can give them the people who seem most compatible."

The app launched on Sept. 15, but the siblings have put in nearly two years of development.

"The first year was really fleshing out the idea, and creating a business plan that allowed us to feel comfortable being able to bring it to market," says Sarah.

The pair divided their tasks for creating the app based on their own strengths. Sarah, who's based in the Washington D.C. area, handles the business development, logistics, and operations. She founded her marketing and communications services firm called Breck — named after the Colorado skiing resort, Breckenridge. Jeff, who Sarah calls "the face of Axis Earth" and is naturally more outgoing, dealt with marketing and brand awareness.

She and Jeff did multiple interviews with athletes about the kinds of things they wanted to see in a site like this. Software teams spent six months building the back-end mechanisms that would put those opinions into practice. Then came all the front-end design.

The result is an app that can appeal, the Longs feel, to users across multiple disciplines and at multiple skill levels. Users select the sport they're passionate about and choose their level of of participation from beginner, intermediate, or professional.

"And for those who select professional, we independently validate that," says Sarah.

The app is designed for those who enjoy being active. Jeff said that they wanted something that would use technology to get people away from technology.

"I want people to be able to use their phones to put down their phones," he says. "Whether you're using the app to find other people who want to do what you do, or if you're looking at a photo someone posted and it inspires you to get out there and be more active."

Houston-based ChaiOne has launched a new tool that can help companies track supply chain delays resulting from COVID-19. Photo via chaione.com

Houston-based ChaiOne recently announced the soft launch of Velostics, the "slack" for logistics that solve wait times and cash flow challenges in the supply chain and logistics industry. The digital logistics platform is set to aid the struggling supply chain as surging demands stretch suppliers, offering their platform free for 60 days.

The platform, aimed at making communication and execution of industrial shipments easier is one of ChaiOne's software service startups. The digital solutions provider for the energy, power, and industrial sectors is a leader in behavioral science-led solutions for logistics operations.

"At ChaiOne we have a history of helping Houstonians whenever disaster strikes," says CEO and founder, Gaurav Khandelwal. "We created a disaster connect app during Hurricane Harvey for free that connected people with the resources they need. Velostics by pure happenstance happened to be ready for situations like [the coronavirus] when there's a lot of parties that need to collaborate."

Velostics results in an improved cash cycle for clients, cutting a 90-day settlement down to one day, along with an overhead reduction that reduces costs and improves output along with error reduction. The digital platform is specially engineered to reduce waste while keeping the supply chain running efficiently.

"With Velostics everybody in the supply chain whether it's the carrier, the truck driver, the warehouse worker or the customer can all be on the same page and in the same system using the in-app messaging system and satellite locations to see where the shipment is in real-time," says Khandelwal.

Like many other companies and individuals, Velostics has not been left untouched by the fallout of the spread of the coronavirus. This year they were chosen by Plug and Play Tech Center as a keynote for the Agora track of CERA week, with the cancellation of the premier energy conference they were not able to roll out the platform to a large audience.

"It's definitely unfortunate, but the situation has been changing daily and it has resulted in new opportunities for Velostics," says Khandelwal.

Velostics uses machine learning algorithms to predict wait times, help customers utilize their assets and plan more efficiently. The benefits of the logistics platform focus on reducing wait times for industrial shippers, third-party logistics providers, and freight brokers.

Today, they find themselves using these tools to help the community. Along with offering their platform for free for 60 days, they will be partnering with the American Red Cross to aid health professionals get the medical gear they need.

"Like any startup, we have a hypothesis about how to improve the industry which we then test, says Khandelwal. "But when there's a need such as this one, the hypothesis goes out of the window because the market is changing rapidly. If we can do anything to help from a supply-chain perspective to help save lives, we are very much open to sharing ideas."