Teaming up

The Cannon and Capital Factory announce new Houston-based partnership

The new partnership will result in Capital Factory-branded space in The Cannon's new 120,000-square-foot innovation hub, which is expected to open next month. Courtesy of The Cannon

Two major players in the Texas innovation ecosystem are teaming up for a partnership in Houston.

The Cannon, which is expected to open its 120,000-square-foot space later this summer, announced a partnership with Austin-based Capital Factory, a tech accelerator. The partnership will give Capital Factory space in The Cannon to provide remote mentorship and local programming for its Houston-based companies for six months throughout the cohort.

This alliance allows for more collaboration between Houston companies and mentors and resources across the state.

"The Texas Startup Manifesto is about leveraging the entire Texas startup ecosystem while honoring the unique contributions of each city and region," says Gordon Daugherty, co-founder and president of Capital Factory, in a release. "We can't deliver on that vision in Houston without the help of local partners like The Cannon and their collaborative attitude really sets them apart."

Capital Factory recently entered the Dallas market with the opening of a location in partnership with The Dallas Entrepreneur Center.

This new office space will result in two new hires for Capital Factory — both will be responsible to advancing the Texas-wide program. A venture associate position will be created to recruit and educate local companies. The associate will also find potential investments for the accelerator's venture fund, which has already invested in several Houston startups, including Apartment Butler, Groupraise, Hypergiant, and Zenus Biometrics in 2018.

The second new hire will be a mentor coordinator to seek out new mentors — not necessarily in Houston, as mentors can access startups through a software platform.

Capital Factory's space in The Cannon will be a branded office complete with Cisco Webex video conferencing equipment, according to the release, so that local Capital Factory startups can connect to mentors across the state. As an added plus, the entrepreneurs can also have access to The Cannon community, and vice versa. Capital Factory will also host events at The Cannon.

"We're thrilled that this partnership with Capital Factory will connect Houston startups with more resources," says Lawson Gow, founder and CEO of The Cannon, in the release. "These companies will have a chance to join an incredibly valuable network, and in return, Capital Factory will have the opportunity to invest in Houston's booming startup scene and diverse talent pool." (Gow is the son of InnovationMap's CEO.)

Houston startups stand to benefit from this partnership, according to Aaron Knape, co-founder and CEO of Houston-based sEATz, who says he's already seen the benefit of the alliance.

"The Cannon and Capital Factory's partnership has proven to be a game-changing resource for us, giving our team access to Capital Factory's incredible Accelerator platform while allowing our company to remain in Houston and continue to receive all of the benefits of The Cannon's growing entrepreneurial community," Knape says in the release.

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Building Houston

 
 

We could all use a little IT help right now. Photo by Maskot/Getty

Though it's been around since 2012, JPMorgan Chase's Force for Good program feels especially vital right now. The project connects Chase employee volunteers with hundreds of nonprofits around the world to build sustainable tech solutions that help advance their missions.

Even better, Houston and Dallas nonprofits have a leg up in the selection process. Organizations located in or near one of Chase's tech centers get priority, and that includes H-Town and Big D.

The government-registered nonprofits, foundations, and social enterprises (we're talking everything from food banks to theater companies) selected to participate will have access to a team of up to 10 highly skilled technologists, who will spend approximately four hours per week advising over an eight month period.

Each nonprofit is asked to propose the specific project that would benefit from technology guidance, and it needs to be something the organization can maintain when the project period is over.

"We have more than 50,000 technologists at JPMorgan Chase around the world and they're passionate about giving back," says Ed Boden, global lead of Technology for Social Good programs. "Force for Good gives our employees the opportunity to utilize their unique skills while also learning new ones, to build technology solutions for the organizations that need it most."

If you're the director, CEO, or other person in charge at a nonprofit and you still have questions about Force for Good, Chase has put together a free webinar to help explain further.

These webinars cover the overall program experience and application process, and it's highly recommended that nonprofits watch before applying. The live webinar dates (with Texas times) are June 2 from 1:30-2:30 pm and June 8 from 10:30-11:30 am.

A pre-recorded webinar will also be available for nonprofits to review after the live webinar dates.

Since 2012, Force for Good has worked with over 320 organizations in 22 cities, contributing over 190,500 hours of knowledge and skills.

"It is a great program that can provide strong impact for nonprofit organizations that need technology help," says Chris Rapp, a Dallas-based Chase executive. "As a father and husband of two Dallas artists, I am a huge believer in helping the arts grow and hopefully we can help do this through Force For Good."

The application process opened on May 28, with a deadline to submit by July 10.

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