ending cancer

Houston cancer therapeutics accelerator announces newest cohort

Twenty investigators and early-stage biotechnology companies have been named to the latest Texas Medical Center's cohort. Courtesy of TMC

Texas Medical Center Innovation named 20 oncology startups to the 2022 cohort of its groundbreaking Accelerator for Cancer Therapeutics this week in celebration with the 50th anniversary of the National Cancer Act.

The group of Texas-based companies and academic researchers will participate in 9 months of clinical and business development education through the accelerator, with the goal of reaching new milestones, developing strategic plans for their companies, commercializing, and preparing for clinical trials. At the close of the session, the companies will be eligible to apply for grants and pitch investors and corporate partners.

"With the ongoing pandemic, which poses more threat to at-risk populations, it has never been more important to mature novel cancer therapeutics," says Emily Reiser, associate director of TMC Innovation, in a statement. "Any drug currently on the market is developed in the spirit of scientific discovery. The importance of developing innovative solutions is not just something that drives TMCi and our Accelerators, and it is at the heart of our ability to improve patient care and outcomes."

The researchers and companies in the 2022 cohort are developing inventive cancer solutions that consider everything from vaccines against cancer to noninvasive therapies to image-guided technologies and advanced diagnosis. The full list of members includes:

TMiC's ACT was launched in 2019 thanks to a grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, and is in association with the Gulf Coast Consortia (GCC) and the University of Texas Medical Branch. That year, the CPRIT announced 71 statewide grants, awarding the TMC $5 million to launch the accelerator.

The ACT's first cohort kicked off in January of 2021 with a group split about evenly between companies and academic researchers-all hailing from Texas.

Houston has become a hub for oncology innovation in recent years, in part thanks to the ACT's work. Click here to listen to Innovation Map's interview with Enrique Gomez, the ACT's entrepreneur in residence, on how the TMC and other Texas institutions are looking at "every possible strategy to tackle cancer."

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Building Houston

 
 

Here's how much time Houstonians spend in traffic. Photo via Getty Images

Traffic is a part of life in Houston. But a new study quantifies just how much time the average Bayou City dweller spends sitting in rush hour gridlock every year—and the results are eye opening.

According to a study released this month by CoPilot, Houstonians lose nearly four days of time each year due to rush hour commuting.

The report found that rush hour extends Houstonians' commute by an extra 22 minutes per day. Annually, that totaled an additional 91.6 hours commuting due to rush hour.

This earned the Houston area (including the Woodlands and Sugar Land) a No. 8 spot on CoPilot's list of cities where commuters lose the most time to rush hour.

Evening commutes saw the highest increase in time in Houston, with the average commuter spending 14 additional minutes on roadways due to rush hour. Morning rush hour in Houston added about eight minutes to commuters' daily drives.

Houston was the only Texas city to make CoPilot's list of the top 15 cities that lost the most time to rush hour traffic. New York drivers lost the most time to rush hour, which adds about 32 minutes to daily commutes and 132 hours a year, according to the report. Los Angeles drivers lost the second-most time, followed by urban Honolulu, Miami, Baton Rouge, Louisiana; and Birmingham, Alabama.

The report found that drivers in Houston spend about eight more minutes commuting during rush hour than the average driver in the county. That totals to about 30 more hours per year than the average U.S. driver.

Commute times have been dropping nationally, reaching a low of 25.6 minutes in 2021 compared to 27.6 minutes in 2019, as more workers have transitioned to hybrid schedules or working from home, according to CoPilot

In 2020, Houston drivers even witnessed a 33 percent drop in traffic compared to in 2019, according to a study from Rice.

Still, Houston roadways are consistently ranked among the most congested in the country. Last year, a similar study found that the typical Houston driver wasted 46 hours due to traffic congestion.

Portions of the 610 West Loop are notorious for being ranked as the state's most congested roadways, and other stretches of roads are known as some of the worst bottlenecks in Texas.

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