Support systems

Identifying and engaging community stakeholders from the start is key to a success startup

Early and effective stakeholder outreach is a key part of a successful project. Getty Images

Often times we think of technology as innovation. But innovation and the success derived from it is not always about technological advances.

Technological advances have driven innovation in all sectors of our economy. Technology and social media have driven social change and changed how stakeholders— the public and outside influencers — impact infrastructure and construction projects, and how they advocate with policy leaders. This includes the energy, utilities, infrastructure, real estate projects, and manufacturing industries.

Often times the innovation from technology is about a new way of thinking and how one adapts to, works with, and embraces technology and how it impacts a business or an industry. It is about a willingness to do things differently because technology now drives us to think creatively and differently than in the past. It is taking a new approach to how one manages risk, solves problems and meets the challenges facing a business or an industry.

Technology has changed how we communicate as a culture. It has changed how the public communicates with business and how business has to communicate with the public. Because of the growth and influence of social media in our culture, business must now mange a new kind of risk in the risk register of a project. It has to change how it interacts and communicates with stakeholders. It has to be more attentive and listen actively compared to how it operated in the past. Gone are the days when a project manager, private equity firm/investor or company developing a project can "keep their head down so they don't get shot at."

I listed the many industries that are impacted by social media. There is no better example of an industry that has had to change and use innovative and new ways of communicating due to technology. Regardless of the energy project, the development of oil & gas, building a pipeline, new utility lines, a refinery or chemical facility the industry now has to assess who their stakeholders are, listen to them attentively, and develop a strategic plan for outreach. If a company changes how they interact with stakeholders the associated risks will be minimized, mitigated and/or reduced.

There are a plethora of energy projects I can list that highlight how a business failed to innovate in response to how they failed to adapt to, work with and embrace the technology of social media and how it impacts them. One project sums it up, Keystone.

Effective stakeholder outreach has four parts: identification, analysis, prioritization and engagement.

Identification
The first step is to identify the stakeholders. This includes those who will be directly or indirectly impacted such as local, state and federal political leaders, NGOs, media, faith-based groups, landowners, civic leaders, nearby businesses and advocacy groups.

Analysis
The analysis is an evaluation of possible risks related to the stakeholders and the community where the project is planned such as stakeholders who might be opposed to the project, have concerns or be able to influence the process in any way. Have there been issues in the community or legislative bodies that might have a negative impact?

Prioritization
Prioritization is the process of taking the results from the analysis of stakeholders and determining what risks or issues exist. These risks are ranked. Strategies and tactics are developed to address and mitigate them. Finally, a determination is made regarding how and when to communicate with stakeholders.

Engagement
Engagement is the final part of stakeholder outreach. This is the process of communicating with stakeholders to explain the project and how they will be impacted. It will also serve as an opportunity to solicit feedback and insight as well as to continue analyzing risks from stakeholders.

Early and effective stakeholder outreach is a key part of a successful project. It is a new and innovative way of thinking about how to understand and mitigate project risk. It is a willingness to change because technology has shifted how our culture communicates, advocates and engages with business, policy leaders and one another.

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Andrew Biar is founder and president of Strategic Public Affairs, a government relations and PR/communications firm based in Houston.
The Lone Star State stands out for being the best to start a business. Photo by gguy44/Getty Images

The entrepreneurial spirit is best cultivated by Texans, apparently. The Lone Star State comes in first place for being business-friendly to startups and their founders in a recent study.

Out of all 50 states, Texas reigns supreme in WalletHub's report of the best and worst states to start a business. Texas earns a score of 61.05, which factored in business environment, access to resources, and business costs. Of those factors, the state ranked No. 1 for business environment, No. 11 for access to resources, and No. 30 for business costs.

Zeroing in on some key factors, Texas was recognized for having the fourth highest average growth in small businesses and the fifth highest total spending on incentives as its percent of gross domestic product. Texas also has the fourth longest work week by hours.

Texas edged out No. 2 Utah by a mere 0.1 points. The rest of the top five includes Georgia, North Dakota, and Oklahoma, respectively. At the bottom of the rankings are Connecticut, Hawaii, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Rhode Island.

"In looking at the main criteria WalletHub used to determine their best startup state ranking — namely business environment, access to resources and business costs — it's clear why Texas would come in at No. 1," Susan Davenport, senior vice president of economic development for the Greater Houston Partnership, tells InnovationMap. "These are all areas where the Lone Star State consistently excels and why Texas continues to attract both entrepreneurs and existing companies across industry sectors."

Houston recently received a similar distinction from the personal finance site. In May, WalletHub used 19 key metrics — such as five-year business-survival rate and office-space affordability — to name Houston the No. 13 best city for starting a business out of 100 of the largest U.S. metros. In that study, a total of seven Texas cities made the top 20.

"Here in Houston, we're seeing growth in tech-related startups in particular and an increasing momentum of activity to support growth stage companies including the development of The Ion and the TMC3 commercialization campus, and the opening of The Cannon start-up hub, among several others," Davenport adds.

Texas also has a favorable business climate for female entrepreneurs in particular, one study found. Texas moved up to No. 1 from No. 8 in 2018 in this report by Fit Small Business that published in January.

Meanwhile, while known for being best for business, Texas is far from the top ranking in a study that analyzed the states' overall capacity. Texas came in at No. 38 in U.S. News & World Report's best states rankings for 2019, but even this report recognized Texas' business climate.

"Texas' diverse industrial base has drawn many businesses and workers in recent decades because of light regulation, low taxes and a low cost of labor," U.S. News says. "Entrepreneurs are particularly attracted to Austin, which emerged as a major player in the technology industry in the 1990s. Its 'South by Southwest' is one of the preeminent national tech conferences."

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This article was updated to include the comment from GHP.