Must be the money

4 financial concerns to keep in mind when launching a startup

Every penny counts when you're starting a company. Getty Images

You have been working on a new creative technology idea for months, an idea that will solve a problem or make a current process even better. Your innovative idea is ready for the next step, and you, in turn, are prepared to begin your tech startup. Building a company can be stressful and exhausting, but also exhilarating and rewarding. As you begin your product launch, keep these financial tips in mind when starting out.

Consider your funding
Determine how much funding you can use from your personal accounts to jumpstart your business. By investing some of your own money into your company, you show good faith in your business plan and product. This method is appealing to investors because it shows you have a long-term commitment to the company. Next, determine how much you will need from other sources and what those other sources should be. Potential options of funding in addition to traditional bank loans are venture capitalists, angel investors, government grants, and support from business incubators.

Determine your budget
An essential step of starting up is concluding how much funding you need to get started. Establishing a realistic budget is crucial. It can make the difference between having a successful business or joining the 50 percent of small businesses that fail in the first four years. The hiring of employees, leasing office space or lab space, purchasing office equipment, paying for insurance (health and liability) and providing yourself a salary are all items that need to be included in your budget.

Unanticipated extra costs occur from time to time, so overestimate your expenses. Underestimating expenses can sink your startup. Ensure your business is solvent by preparing your budget for more. Additionally, keep in mind different types of expenses, and budget accordingly. For example, you may have one-time costs and on-going costs or fixed costs and variable costs.

Cash flow
According to a U.S. Bank Study, 82 percent of businesses that fail do so because of cash flow problems. Managing your cash flow is crucial to success. Without positive cash flow, you are not able to pay your employees, rent, or taxes. Having profits does not necessarily mean you have positive cash flow. Keep ongoing cash flow work sheets to ensure you have the cash you need to continue on a successful path.

Managing for life
As mentioned earlier, make sure you pay yourself something. It does not have to be a big salary in the beginning, but you need to eat. Additionally, you need to save for emergencies. An old rule of thumb states that an emergency fund should consist of three to six months' worth of expenses. As a result, an emergency fund can make the months where business is slow, or between projects, more sustainable.

Meanwhile, it is a good idea to separate your personal and business banking accounts. Doing so will allow you to stay more organized and help tracking and managing expenses easier. Additionally, separate accounts may be beneficial when paying taxes. Consult a tax professional for additional guidance on taxes. Finally, do not forget to save for your retirement. While it is important to focus on your new business, do not neglect to take care of your personal financial health.

With proper planning and continued financial monitoring, starting your own tech business can be done well and bring years of career satisfaction.

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Joseph Radzwill is senior vice president and a financial adviser with the wealth management division of Morgan Stanley in Houston.

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Auburn University's SwiftSku took first place in this year's virtually held Rice Business Plan Competition, but it was the second place company that went home with over half a million in cash and investment prizes. Photo via rice.edu

In its 21st year, the Rice Business Plan Competition hosted 54 student-founded startups from all over the world — its largest batch of companies to date — and doled out over $1.4 million in cash and investment prizes at the week-long virtual competition.

RBPC, which is put on by the Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship, took place Tuesday, April 6, to Friday, April 9 this year. Just like 2020, RBPC was virtually held. The competition announced the 54 participating startups last month, and coordinated the annual elevator pitches, a semi-finals round, wildcard round and live final pitches. The contestants also received virtual networking and mentoring.

Earlier this week, Rice Alliance announced the seven student-led startups that then competed in the finals. From this pack, the judges awarded the top prizes. Here's how the finalists placed and what won:

  • SwiftSku from Auburn University, point of sales technology for convenience stores that allows for real time analytics, won first place and claimed the $350,000 grand prize from Goose Capital. The company also won the $50,000 Business Angel Minority Association Prize, the $500 Best Digital Elevator Pitch Prize from Mercury Fund, and the $500 Third Place Anbarci Family People's Choice prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $401,000. The company also won the CFO Consulting Prize, a $25,000 in-kind award.
  • AgZen from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a pesticide alternative spray and formulation technology company, won the second place $100,000 investment prize (awarded by Finger Interests, Anderson Family Fund, Greg Novak, and Tracy Druce). The startup also won a $300,000 Owl Investment Prize, the $100,000 Houston Angel Network Prize, the $500 Best Energy Elevator Pitch Prize from Mercury Fund, and the $1,500 Third Place Anbarci Family People's Choice prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $502,000. The company also won the $30,000 in-kind Polsinelli Energy Prize.
  • FibreCoat GmbH from RWTH Aachen University, a startup with patented spinning technology for the production of inexpensive high-performance composite fibers, won the third place $50,000 investment prize (also awarded by Finger Interests, Anderson Family Fund, Greg Novak, and Tracy Druce). The company also won the $100,000 TiE Houston Angels Prize and the $500 Best Hard Tech Elevator Pitch Prize from Mercury Fund, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $150,500.
  • Candelytics from Harvard University, a startup building the digital infrastructure for 3-D data, won the fourth place $5,000 prize.
  • OYA FEMTECH Apparel from UCLA, an athletic wear company that designs feminine health-focused clothing, won the fifth place $5,000 prize. The company also won the $5,000 Eagle Investors Prize, the $25,000 Urban Capital Network Prize, and the $1,000 Second Place Anbarci Family People's Choice prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $36,000.
  • LFAnt Medical from McGill University , an innovative and tech-backed STI testing company, won the sixth place $5,000 prize and the $20,000 Johnson and Johnson Innovation Prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $25,000.
  • SimpL from the University of Pittsburgh, an AI-backed fitness software company, won the seventh place $5,000 prize. The company also won the $25,000 Spirit of Entrepreneurship Prize from the Pearland Economic Development Corp., bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $30,000.

Some of the competition's participating startups outside of the seven finalists won monetary and in-kind prizes. Here's a list of those.

  • Mercury Fund's Elevator Pitch Prizes also included:
    • Best Life Science $500 Prize to Blue Comet Medical Solutions from Northwestern University
    • Best Consumer $500 Prize to EasyFlo from the University of New Mexico
    • Best Overall $1,000 prize to Anthro Energy from Stanford University
  • The Palo Alto Software Outstanding LivePlan Pitch $3,000 Prize went to LiRA Inc. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • The OFW Law FDA Regulatory Strategy Prize, a $20,000 in-kind award went to Paldara Inc. from Oklahoma State University.
  • The Silver Fox Mentoring Prize, which included $20,000 in kind prizes to three winners selected Ai-Ris from Texas A&M University, BruxAway from the University of Texas, and Karkinex from Rice University as recipients.
  • The first, second, and third place winners also each received the legal service prize from Baker Botts for a total of $20,000 in-kind award.
  • The Courageous Women Entrepreneurship Prize from nCourage — a $50,000 investment prize — went to Shelly Xu Design from Harvard University.
  • The SWPDC Pediatric Device Prize — usually a $50,000 investment divided its prize to two winners to receive $25,000 each
    • Blue Comet Medical Solutions from Northwestern University
    • Neurava from Purdue University
  • TMC Innovation Healthcare Prize awarded a $100,000 investment prize and admission into its accelerator to ArchGuard from Duke University
  • The Artemis Fund awarded its $100,000 investment prize to Kit Switch from Stanford University
The awards program concluded with a plan to host the 22nd annual awards in 2022 in person.

If you missed the virtual programming, each event was hosted live on YouTube and the videos are now available on the Rice Alliance's page.

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