Must be the money

4 financial concerns to keep in mind when launching a startup

Every penny counts when you're starting a company. Getty Images

You have been working on a new creative technology idea for months, an idea that will solve a problem or make a current process even better. Your innovative idea is ready for the next step, and you, in turn, are prepared to begin your tech startup. Building a company can be stressful and exhausting, but also exhilarating and rewarding. As you begin your product launch, keep these financial tips in mind when starting out.

Consider your funding
Determine how much funding you can use from your personal accounts to jumpstart your business. By investing some of your own money into your company, you show good faith in your business plan and product. This method is appealing to investors because it shows you have a long-term commitment to the company. Next, determine how much you will need from other sources and what those other sources should be. Potential options of funding in addition to traditional bank loans are venture capitalists, angel investors, government grants, and support from business incubators.

Determine your budget
An essential step of starting up is concluding how much funding you need to get started. Establishing a realistic budget is crucial. It can make the difference between having a successful business or joining the 50 percent of small businesses that fail in the first four years. The hiring of employees, leasing office space or lab space, purchasing office equipment, paying for insurance (health and liability) and providing yourself a salary are all items that need to be included in your budget.

Unanticipated extra costs occur from time to time, so overestimate your expenses. Underestimating expenses can sink your startup. Ensure your business is solvent by preparing your budget for more. Additionally, keep in mind different types of expenses, and budget accordingly. For example, you may have one-time costs and on-going costs or fixed costs and variable costs.

Cash flow
According to a U.S. Bank Study, 82 percent of businesses that fail do so because of cash flow problems. Managing your cash flow is crucial to success. Without positive cash flow, you are not able to pay your employees, rent, or taxes. Having profits does not necessarily mean you have positive cash flow. Keep ongoing cash flow work sheets to ensure you have the cash you need to continue on a successful path.

Managing for life
As mentioned earlier, make sure you pay yourself something. It does not have to be a big salary in the beginning, but you need to eat. Additionally, you need to save for emergencies. An old rule of thumb states that an emergency fund should consist of three to six months' worth of expenses. As a result, an emergency fund can make the months where business is slow, or between projects, more sustainable.

Meanwhile, it is a good idea to separate your personal and business banking accounts. Doing so will allow you to stay more organized and help tracking and managing expenses easier. Additionally, separate accounts may be beneficial when paying taxes. Consult a tax professional for additional guidance on taxes. Finally, do not forget to save for your retirement. While it is important to focus on your new business, do not neglect to take care of your personal financial health.

With proper planning and continued financial monitoring, starting your own tech business can be done well and bring years of career satisfaction.

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Joseph Radzwill is senior vice president and a financial adviser with the wealth management division of Morgan Stanley in Houston.

First thing's first: Don't tell everyone. Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images

If you have a successful tech startup, you may be working towards an exit plan where your vision and innovation is turned into liquidity. When a unique, innovative idea hits the big time, investors and other tech companies take notice, and some founders of startups discover themselves with sudden wealth.

Whether you take your company public or are eventually acquired by a much larger organization, you may find yourself looking at millions or billions of dollars one day. If this happens to you, there are crucial steps you should consider to help ensure you stay financially healthy for the long-term.

Keep your head down and do your homework.

First, be as quiet as possible about your new windfall. While selling your company may be public knowledge, keep conversations about your finances and situation minimal and confidential until you have a plan. The more hushed you keep your new financial situation, the less pressure you may have from others asking for favors and handouts.

Additionally, do your research before making any decisions. While you are coming to terms with your new wealth, search for the right team, including a financial adviser, attorney, and accountant, to help you set your goals, both long and short term. This may include tax efficiency and structure, such as trusts and family limited partnerships.

Research a potential advisers' philosophy, fees, and expertise. Have a background check run on anyone you hire, including their financial situation. Review your engagement letter and understand the small print. Be patient as you search for the right team — they are extremely important to your future.

Find an adviser you trust.

Part of your team should include a financial adviser who can be an invaluable resource during this time and into the future for many reasons.

First, he or she can help you identify potential present and future financial goals, plan for the next generation, and structure an income stream, which will ultimately help guide your money to survive you. You might find yourself in the unique position to make donations you have only dreamed of, and that, too, requires guidance.

A financial adviser can also help when friends and organizations are looking for financial contributions from you. Sudden wealth often leads to many changes which are hard to anticipate. Do not let your guard down. Family and friends can come out of the woodwork. Also, be aware of frivolous lawsuits and threats. Keep you and your family safe.

Don't go crazy.

Be disciplined in your spending. Some pro-athletes and lottery winners have filed for bankruptcy after blowing all of their wealth. Do not fall into this trap.

With the help of your financial adviser, you may decide to put your money where you cannot access it easily, such as a house or a 529 savings plan for your children's college. Or, you may decide to have your financial adviser help establish a salary for you each month so you can control your cash better.

After working hard to build a product or platform and the success of selling it for top dollar, ensure you are just as wise with your proceeds. Follow trusted advice from a well-vetted financial adviser and take your time to make major decisions. Trust your gut and enjoy the ride!

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Gail Stalarow is vice president and financial adviser with The Clarity Group in the Wealth Management Division of Morgan Stanley in Houston.