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the robooze are coming

Italian 3D printing company to set up U.S. headquarters in Houston

Originally based in Italy, Roboze plans to expand its American headquarters in Houston. Photo courtesy of Roboze

An innovative 3D printing manufacturer is moving in on the Bayou City — and is bringing with it a need for tens of new hires.

Roboze, based in southern Italy, is launching its American headquarters in Houston. The company plans to hire up to 25 people by the end of this year and more than 50 in the next year.

Originally based in Bari, Roboze's innovative 3D printing technology is set to land in Houston in September, with more than 20 industrial 3D printers, in order to form a stronger bond with local oil and gas companies who are their clients.

"Our 3D printers and supermaterials are used to produce end-use parts and small-medium series for production purposes, replacing obsolete production methods and replacing metals," says founder and CEO Alessio Lorusso in an email to InnovationMap.

The innovative technology is used to produce strong and super-resistant end-use parts that can be used in a variety of applications including oil and gas, aerospace, electric vehicles, and defense. The 3D printing technology is already being used by major industry leaders such as Sony, Bosch, Airbus, and the U.S. Army.

"The Houston along with the Texas market is especially interesting because of oil and gas," says Ilaria Guicciardini, marketing director for Roboze. "We are very involved in the oil and gas and aerospace sectors which are areas Houston excels in. The goal is to expand our brand and be closer to the customer which can only be done by expanding into the Houston area."

The 3D printing technology uses patented systems to provide precise and repeatable printing tech that optimizes production by supplying components, reducing the post-production process, and in turn warehousing and logistics costs.

Roboze has 300 printing machines around 24 countries around the world, with its Houston headquarters inauguration in September it will become the third largest printing facility in the local area. The facilities will be able to print benchmarks and parts for all of the 3D printing company's American customers, especially oil and gas clients in the Houston area.

"We want to invest in the U.S.," says Guicciardini. "We want to create our own team to invest in customer care for our American customers."Roboze's American headquarters will be located at 7934 Breen Drive Houston, Texas 77064, in Northwest Houston. The innovative 3D printing company's American operations will be led by Shirley Rivera, the U.S. Operations Manager at Roboze, a U.S. native with extensive experience in management roles in Italy.

"We are hoping to invest and reply to the demand for 3D printing for this kind of materials with the way we do at Roboze," says Guicciardini.

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Building Houston

 
 

Contact-free market shopping has come to campus at UH. Photo courtesy of UH

A convenience store on campus at the University of Houston just got a little more, well, convenient — and a whole lot safer.

UH and its dining services partner, Chartwells Higher Education, have partnered with tech company Standard to upgrade the check-out process of convenience shopping. The technology is easy to install and can retrofit any convenience store to a contact-less process.

"Students' tastes change constantly, and we're well equipped to handle that. But their shopping preferences evolve too, and we want to continue providing new and unique shopping experiences that are unexpected on a college campus," says David Riddle, vice president of operations for Chartwells Higher Ed, and district manager for UH System Dining, in a press release. "This is the future of shopping, and with autonomous checkout through Standard, we've made it as easy, safe and convenient as possible for students to come in, get what they need, and go."

The store, called Market Next, is located at UH's Technology Bridge and opened earlier this month. Enabled by cameras and easy-to-use scanners, the store operates 24 hours a day and is also designed for quick service for students on the go. The fastest shopping trip recorded by Standard is 2.3 seconds.

"Market Next is the first retail store in the world to be retrofitted for a 100 percent cashierless, checkout-free experience," says Jordan Fisher, co-founder and CEO of Standard, in the release. "Our platform is the only system on the market proven to retrofit an entire retail experience. Innovative retailers like Chartwells use the AI-powered Standard platform to enable shoppers to grab any product they want and simply walk out, without waiting in line. We are excited to partner with Chartwells to deliver this groundbreaking technology to more locations around the country."

Chartwells is working with Standard to bring more of these stores across the country — as well as more itterations on the UH campus.

"Checkout-free technology is an innovation that will make our students' lives a little easier and a lot safer. This is the new standard for campus safety that is important to students today and for the foreseeable future," says Emily Messa, associate vice chancellor and associate vice president for administration at UH, in the release. "That's why we will plan to convert additional Market stores on campus to this technology in the coming year."

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