the robooze are coming

Italian 3D printing company to set up U.S. headquarters in Houston

Originally based in Italy, Roboze plans to expand its American headquarters in Houston. Photo courtesy of Roboze

An innovative 3D printing manufacturer is moving in on the Bayou City — and is bringing with it a need for tens of new hires.

Roboze, based in southern Italy, is launching its American headquarters in Houston. The company plans to hire up to 25 people by the end of this year and more than 50 in the next year.

Originally based in Bari, Roboze's innovative 3D printing technology is set to land in Houston in September, with more than 20 industrial 3D printers, in order to form a stronger bond with local oil and gas companies who are their clients.

"Our 3D printers and supermaterials are used to produce end-use parts and small-medium series for production purposes, replacing obsolete production methods and replacing metals," says founder and CEO Alessio Lorusso in an email to InnovationMap.

The innovative technology is used to produce strong and super-resistant end-use parts that can be used in a variety of applications including oil and gas, aerospace, electric vehicles, and defense. The 3D printing technology is already being used by major industry leaders such as Sony, Bosch, Airbus, and the U.S. Army.

"The Houston along with the Texas market is especially interesting because of oil and gas," says Ilaria Guicciardini, marketing director for Roboze. "We are very involved in the oil and gas and aerospace sectors which are areas Houston excels in. The goal is to expand our brand and be closer to the customer which can only be done by expanding into the Houston area."

The 3D printing technology uses patented systems to provide precise and repeatable printing tech that optimizes production by supplying components, reducing the post-production process, and in turn warehousing and logistics costs.

Roboze has 300 printing machines around 24 countries around the world, with its Houston headquarters inauguration in September it will become the third largest printing facility in the local area. The facilities will be able to print benchmarks and parts for all of the 3D printing company's American customers, especially oil and gas clients in the Houston area.

"We want to invest in the U.S.," says Guicciardini. "We want to create our own team to invest in customer care for our American customers."Roboze's American headquarters will be located at 7934 Breen Drive Houston, Texas 77064, in Northwest Houston. The innovative 3D printing company's American operations will be led by Shirley Rivera, the U.S. Operations Manager at Roboze, a U.S. native with extensive experience in management roles in Italy.

"We are hoping to invest and reply to the demand for 3D printing for this kind of materials with the way we do at Roboze," says Guicciardini.

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Building Houston

 
 

A new report finds Houston a top city for business friendliness and connectivity. Photo via Getty Images

Houston, the future looks bright.

A new study from the fDi Intelligence division of the Financial Times places Houston at No. 7 among the top major cities of the future for 2021-22 across North, South, and Central America. Among major cities in the Americas, Houston appears at No. 3 for business friendliness and No. 4 for connectivity.

"Houston is known as one of the youngest, fastest-growing, and most diverse cities anywhere in the world. I am thrilled that we continue to be recognized for our thriving innovation ecosystem," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is quoted as saying in the fDi study.

Toronto leads the 2021-22 list of the top major cities in the Americas, followed by San Francisco, Montreal, Chicago, and Boston.

The rankings are based on data in five categories:

  • Economic potential
  • Business friendliness
  • Human capital and lifestyle
  • Cost effectiveness
  • Connectivity

Houston's no stranger to the list. Last year, the city ranked No. 3 on the same study, and in 2019, claimed the No. 5 spot.

"The fact that Houston consistently ranks among the top markets for foreign direct investment speaks to our region's connectivity and business-friendly environment," says Susan Davenport, chief economic development officer at the Greater Houston Partnership. "Many of the industry sectors we target for expansion and relocation in Houston are global in nature — from energy 2.0 and life sciences to aerospace and digital tech. The infrastructure and diverse workforce that make these prime growth sectors for us among domestic players are equally attractive to international companies looking to establish or strengthen ties in the Americas."

International trade is a cornerstone of the Houston area's economy. In 2020, the region recorded $129.5 billion in exports, according to the Greater Houston Partnership. China ranked as the region's top trading partner last year, followed by Mexico, Brazil, Korea, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Italy.

Houston's role as a hub for foreign trade and international business "is likely to support the region's economic recovery in the months and years ahead," the partnership noted in May.

"We talk often of Houston as a great global city — one that competes with the likes of London, Tokyo, São Paulo, and Beijing. But that's only possible because of our infrastructure — namely our port — and our connections around the world," Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the partnership, said last month. "Houston's ties abroad remain strong."

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