Fresh funds

Houston researchers receive $3.2 million grant to enhance fetal monitoring technology

Two Houston hospitals — Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine — have received funding from the National Institutes of Health. Photo by Dwight C. Andrews/Greater Houston Convention and Visitors Bureau

Thousands of cases of fetal growth restriction occur annually that can lead to complications at birth. In order to get a better idea of condition and to develop better monitoring technology, the National Institutes of Health has granted $3.2 million to researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital.

The researchers are tasked with developing "an improved way to evaluate umbilical venous blood flow using 3D and Doppler ultrasound techniques" in small fetuses, according to a release from Baylor College of Medicine.

"Our research team will initially validate the accuracy and reproducibility of new 3D volume flow measurements and then develop corresponding reference ranges in normal pregnancies," says Dr. Wesley Lee, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Baylor, in the release.

"Detailed observations of fetal growth, heart function, and circulatory changes will be made in over 1,000 small fetuses with estimated weights below the 10th percentile," Lee continues. "The results will be correlated with pregnancy outcomes to identify prenatal predictors of clinical problems in newborns."

The grant will fund a five-year investigation collaboration between the two Houston hospitals, as well as the University of Michigan, Perinatology Research Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, and Human Development and GE Healthcare.

FGR is a condition that affects fetuses that are below the weight normal for their gesticular age — usually in the 10th percentile of weight or less, according to Stanford Children's Health. Underlying issues with placenta or umbilical cord can increase the risks of the condition and causes of FGR can range from blood pressure problems to drug and alcohol use.

Affected fetuses can be at risk of stillbirth or neonatal death. Babies that overcome FGR complications at birth are predisposed to developmental delay and the development of adult diseases such as obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and stroke, according to the release.

According to Dr. Lee, identifying these FGR and at-risk fetuses can benefit their health in infancy as well as throughout their lives.

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Building Houston

 
 

Molecule has closed new funding in order to focus on the energy transition. Photo via Getty Images

A Houston startup with a software-as-a-service platform for the energy transition has announced it closed a funding round with participation from a local venture capital.

Molecule closed its $12 million series A, and Houston-based Mercury Fund was among the company's investors. The company has a cloud-based energy trading and risk management solution for the energy industry and supports power, natural gas, crude/refined products, chemicals, agricultural commodities, softs, metals, cryptocurrencies, and more.

"We led the seed round of Molecule upon their formation and are excited to participate in their series A," says Blair Garrou, co-founder and managing director of Mercury, in a news release. "Molecule's success in the ETRM/CTRM industry, especially in relation to electricity and renewables, positions them as the company to beat for the energy transition in the 2020s."

The company will use its new funds to further build out its product as well as introduce offerings to manage renewables credits, according to the release.

"In 2020, we realized that electricity — the growth commodity of the 2020s — represented over half of Molecule's customer base, and we decided to double down," says Sameer Soleja, founder and CEO of Molecule, in the release. "We were also rated the No. 1 SaaS ETRM/CTRM vendor. With this fundraise, we have the fuel to become No. 1 SaaS platform for power and renewables, and then the market leader overall.

"Molecule is ready to power the energy transition," Soleja continues.

Molecule's last round of funding closed in November 2014. The $1.1 million seed round was supported by Mercury Fund and the Houston Angel Network.

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