guest columns

Houston expert: Prime times for cyber-attacks and how to stay protected

"Hackers are getting ready, so you need to be ready, too." Photo via Getty Images

October is cybersecurity awareness month. The topic might sound overwhelming, and it certainly can be, but there are a few easy ways we can educate and protect ourselves and our loved ones.

Be mindful of timing

Cyber actors target certain times to strike. Experts warn that holiday weekends like Thanksgiving are some of the most prolific times for scammers, who never take a vacation. They can defraud and monetize their actions with little effort.

Why?

During holiday weekends, many people make plans and shop -- online or on a mobile device -- and document their activities on social media. Holidays also come with an elevated amount of email and financial activity, all conveniently while people are "checked out" or traveling. Inboxes become overloaded with holiday messaging and deals.

Attacking someone's account can go unnoticed longer if that person is away from their computer. Or a hacker might execute a well-timed phishing attack for a Friday afternoon, right before someone goes on vacation.

Imagine planning a getaway to Galveston and an email arrives about your hotel confirmation or coupons to attractions at Pleasure Pier. Something like that might be ignored most of the time, but when you're amped up and packing your bags for vacation, it could be enticing.

Protect yourself 

Now that you have some context of when these attempts could happen, here are a few steps you can take now to protect yourself:


Don't click on suspicious links

If you don't know the sender of a text or email, don't open links they contain. Viruses and malware can start pulling information from your personal accounts. Some may look like they are coming from a friend or coworker. Or if the sender looks like a company you do business with and tells you to click a link or call a number, don't call, or click. Instead, call the customer service number on your regular bill and ask if the message is legitimate. In the case above, it may be an attempt to get personal information or scam you.

Remember, government agencies, banks, and other legitimate companies will never ask for personal or financial information, like usernames, passwords, PINs, or credit or debit card numbers by unsolicited text message. If someone calls asking for payment or personal information, tell them you'll call them back and go to the official website and call the real number to see if there is an actual issue.

Block spam calls

AT&T blocks or labels about 1 billion robocalls each month, and our patented, automated scanning helps block spam texts. So, while it may seem like your phone is ringing non-stop with spam calls and even spam texts, imagine how many are blocked. To reduce the number of annoying calls you get each day, find a good calling blocking app. The free AT&T Call ProtectSM app includes spam and automatic fraud call blocking, warns you of incoming nuisance calls, lets you customize your robocall protection and even create your own personal block list.

Become Cyber Aware

As hackers and their scams become more sophisticated, it can seem daunting to protect your accounts, devices and information. Don't despair. Learn how to outsmart the bad guys on att.com/cyberaware. You'll find timely news and information, a quiz to assess your personal risk, and valuable advice for real-life situations, such as what to do if you clicked, answered, or opened a potential scam.

With holiday season around the corner, keep in mind that you aren't the only one preparing for time off or a long weekend. Hackers are getting ready, so you need to be ready, too.

------

Luis Silva is vice president and general manager at AT&T.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

Fertitta and his family have gifted $50 million to UH's medical school. Photo courtesy

As Houston’s most high-profile billionaire and owner of the posh 5-star Post Oak Hotel and Houston Rockets, Tilman J. Fertitta has become synonymous with over-the-top opulence and big-time entertainment.

But the CEO of the massive Feritta Entertainment empire’s latest move has nothing to do with penthouses or point guards, but rather a legacy, game-changing appropriation meant to aid his home state’s health.

The longtime UH board member and former chairman and his family have just pledged $50 million to the University of Houston College of Medicine. In turn, the new medical school has been christened the Tilman J. Fertitta Family College of Medicine.

The projected school, upon completion. Rendering courtesy of University of Houston

This landmark gift aims to address the state’s critical primary care physician shortage, (especially in low-income and underserved communities), as well as attract innovation-focused scholars, UH notes.

Additionally, the grant is meant to further clinical and translational research, with an emphasis on population health, behavioral health, community engagement, and the social determinants of health, according to a press release.

Here is how the Fertitta family gift will be distributed:

  • $10 million funds five endowed chairs for faculty hires who are considered national stars in their fields with a focus on health care innovation. This portion of the gift will be matched one-to-one as part of the University’s “$100 Million Challenge” for chairs and professorships, doubling the endowed principal to $20 million.
  • $10 million establishes an endowed scholarship fund to support endowed graduate research stipends/fellowships for medical students.
  • $10 million will cover start-up costs for the Fertitta Family College of Medicine to enhance research activities including facilities, equipment, program costs and graduate research stipends/fellowships.
  • $20 million will create the Fertitta Dean’s Endowed Fund to support research-enhancing activities.

No stranger to writing big checks, Fertitta donated $20 million to UH Athletics — the largest individual donation ever — in 2016 to transform UH’s basketball arena into the now high-tech Fertitta Center.

CultureMap caught up with the CEO (who just sold his Golden Nugget gaming for $1.6 billion), best-selling author, and Billion Dollar Buyer to discuss his landmark gift.

CultureMap: Congratulations on this legacy grant, which has been a long time coming. What does this gift mean to you, now that it’s finally official?

Tilman Fertitta: This was a vision of our chancellors and, you know, I’m on my third, six-year term and not been the chairman for eight years — and we started working on this, seven, eight years ago.

To be able to be in the beginning and the nucleus, and the idea, and what we wanted, and to get the approval from Austin—to watch it come to fruition, how often does somebody get to do a naming gift at the same time they had a lot to do with the creation of the school? So, it was very special in my heart.

CM: Many know you as the CEO of a hospitality empire, author, and even TV personality. But not many know of your commitment to healthcare.


TF: I think there’s one thing in this world that we definitely should always be treated equally on, and that's that’s equal health care for all. This medical school will serve the whole community.

We’re trying to recruit students who want to be primary physicians who will take care of the community that we live in. It’s just something that was very important to me in my whole family.

CM: Academia, scholarship, and research aside, this could essentially be looked at as seed capital for a fledgling operation. Is that a fair assessment?

TF: I know where you’re going with this and yes, it’s no different than business.

I have the vision to know that being in nearly the third largest city in America and a top 100 university in the United States — as University of Houston is according to U.S. News & World Report — that I know what this is going to be in 50 years. It’s no different than looking at another business that you start and you can have the vision to see how successful it'll be in the years to come.

Being on the ground floor of the University of Houston Medical School and being a part of it from its inception, and to help the seed money that will attract other money, I know that in the years to come what a special nationwide medical school this is going to be — because it’s in one of the great cities of America.

So, to be a part of it today and still be a part of it when I’m not here 50 years from now, maybe even sooner than that [laughs], you know, it’s going to be something very special to always be attached to.

CM: Other Houston medical schools here have distinctions in pivotal research or groundbreaking procedures. Is there a specific direction you’d like UH Med to take, going forward?

TF: Honestly, you know, what I’ve been saying? There’s a significant shortage of primary care physicians, not only in the country, but in the state of Texas. We ranked number 47th in the nation.

What we need in the state of Texas, as well in Houston and everywhere, is primary care physicians to take care of your everyday people—and to see them to know if you need a specialist.

I hope that this medical school looks back and we see that they’re graduating more primary care physicians than any other university in the United States and that's our goal. We’re going to be a med school of the community.

CM: You have zero problem with issuing directives, Tilman. What’s your message to the first graduating class, the one that will initially benefit from this $50 million gold mine?

TF: Go out and take care of the people.

------

This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Trending News