brewing innovation

The Ion Houston serves up new tenant for its Midtown innovation hub

A rendering previews Second Draught. Courtesy of The Ion

Rice University's new innovation district will include a place to kick back and have a beer. The Ion announced that it has added Second Draught to its roster of bars and restaurants.

Slated to open early next year, Second Draught will feature selections from Houston's ever-growing roster of craft beer breweries. The intimate, 2,000-square-foot space will be located on The Ion's street level and feature a wraparound bar.

Owners Sarah Pope and Adam Cryer bring plenty of craft beer credibility to their new project. The husband-and-wife duo also own Baileson Brewing Company, a nano-brewery near Rice Village, which gives them a unique perspective on Second Draught's ability to promote local producers.

"This environment is all about incubating startups and giving creators the support to succeed," Cryer said in a statement. "We want to do the same for Houston's craft beer scene. Call us the incuBrewer."

As the saying goes, "in wine, there is truth," so the possibilities for what The Ion's tenants could discover after an IPA or two seems virtually limitless.

"We hope to be another community gathering place where people can meet, connect, drink beer, and brainstorm," Pope added. "The next technology breakthrough idea could very well happen on a napkin in our bar, so we want to make sure it's a place where people want to be."

Second Draught joins The Ion's dynamic mix of food and beverage concepts. In addition to the craft beer bar, the space will be home to Late August, an Afro-Asian restaurant from Top Chef finalist Dawn Burrell and Lucille's chef-owner Chris Williams; The Lymbar, a bar-forward, small plates concept from chef David Cordua; and Common Bond On-The-Go. Popular food truck STUFF'd Wings will open its first brick-and-mortar location in the former Shipley's Do-Nuts space across the street.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

"The Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup." Photo via Paul Duron/Wikipedia

Houston is kicking up its 2026 FIFA World Cup bid by a notch or two with a new innovative initiative.

The Houston 2026 World Cup Bid Committee on October 14 committed to establishing the nonprofit Soccer Innovation Institute if Houston becomes a host city for the FIFA World Cup.

"The institute will rely on Houston's spirit of innovation to create a united community investment in building a legacy that goes well beyond the city," according to a news release announcing the potential formation of the nonprofit.

The soccer institute, made up of a network of experts and leaders from various global organizations, would conduct specialized think tanks and would support a series of community programs.

"As the energy capital of the world, the global leader in medicine, the universal headquarters for NASA, and the home to numerous sports tech companies, Houston has an abundance of resources that are unmatched by other cities," Houston billionaire John Arnold, chairman of the 2026 bid committee, says in a news release. "By bringing these organizations together under one umbrella, the Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup."

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the institute would align with the city's efforts to build a strong ecosystem for innovation, along with its passion for soccer.

"Houston is recognized as a leader in technology and innovation. We have many innovation hubs around the city that bring bright minds into collaborative spaces where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts," the mayor says.

Held every four years, the World Cup assembles national men's soccer teams from around the world in one of the most planet's most watched sporting events. The traditional 32-team tournament will expand to 48 teams in 2026. After 2026, the World Cup might be staged every two years.

Among those collaborating on the Houston 2026 bid are NRG, the Texas Medical Center, Shell, Chevron, the U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Council for Responsible Sport, the Houston Dynamo, the Houston Dash, the City of Houston, Harris County, and Houston First.

The FIFA World Cup 2026 will be played in 16 cities across the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Houston and Dallas are among the 17 cities vying to become a U.S. host. A final decision is expected in the first half of 2022. If Houston is selected, it will host six World Cup games at NRG Stadium.

Between October 21 and November 1, World Cup delegates will visit eight cities in the running to be North American hosts: Houston, Dallas, Kansas City, Cincinnati, Denver, San Francisco, Seattle, and Monterrey, Mexico.

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