Eavesdropping in Houston

Overheard: Ted Cruz, experts weigh in on why 5G is a game changer for Houston

When it comes to 5G, Houston is setting itself up as a leader within the United States. Getty Images

Last year, Houstonians Clayton and Emily Harris became the first commercial 5G customers. Now, a full year later, the Houston has a major seat at the table that's discussing the advancement of 5G technology.

At a forum on Tuesday, October 1, hosted by CTIA and the Center for Houston's Future, experts discussed Houston's role in the conversation about 5G. Here are some overheards from the morning event.

“We cannot take our leadership in 4G for granted as we transition to 5G.”

— Senator Ted Cruz. Cruz's keynote address warns of the United States resting on its laurels in the race to 5G. While the country had the edge on foreign competition for 4G, that doesn't mean 5G will have the same result, he says. In fact, Cruz cites multiple studies that show China and South Korea lead the race in 5G. Deloitte's research found that China has outspent the U.S. by $24 billion and has built 350,000 new sites, while the U.S. has built fewer than 30,000. The study also showed China is prepared to invest $400 billion. This information aside, Cruz tells the crowd that America has the ability to win the race to 5G.

“I think it’s a wonderful story to see how Texas has been leading the way.” 

— Brendan Carr, FCC commissioner. Carr references the Harris family, as well as other Texas cities he's visited that have been working hard to advance 5G. For Carr, expanding and implementing 5G is a huge opportunity for job creation. "The U.S. isn't the only country in the world that wants these jobs," he says to the crowd. "They're not the only country that wants to see the half a trillion dollars in economic growth that's going to come from this next-generation technology."

“I’ll admit, I’m an optimist, but there are significant challenges to making this 5G future a reality.”

— Jesse Bounds, director of innovation for the city of Houston. Bounds cited a few obstacles to overcome. There's a need for massive investment in infrastructure to blanket cities in 5G, and telecom companies are expected to spend $8 billion over the next five years to build this infrastructure, and cities too will need to invest in smart city technology. Consumers will need to pay more for data, and US consumers pay some of the highest rates in the world already. Not to mention the fact that a third of Americans don't have access to home internet. "As we build the infrastructure of the future, we must do so in a way that closes the digital divide so that those Americans can enjoy the same level of opportunity and prosperity that we do," Bounds says.

"Houston’s 5G network performance is 17 times better than the 4G. That’s today, in the very early days of 5G.”

— Paul Challoner, vice president of network product solutions at Ericsson. Challoner tells the crowd that of course this affects speed of data transferring and that is a huge pro for the technology, but there are other important perks for 5G advancement. The tech also affects device density, meaning that, a very large city like Houston, might have issues in dense areas. 5G also improves connectivity in crucial situations, like in the case of a surgeon using a device during surgery. Lastly, Challoner mentioned 5G is the most advanced technology when it comes to cybersecurity.

"One area that I’m most excited about is all the things that we don't talk about. All the applications that haven't yet been imagined, that are being dreamt up by software developers in their dorm rooms."

— Mishka Dehghan, vice president of 5G development at Sprint. Dehghan points out that 10 years ago, no one could have imagined ride sharing, now that is a huge industry with developing technology thanks to mobile data usage. With with the onset of 5G, she says she can't wait to see what technology is created in the next 10 years.

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Building Houston

 
 

Houston can expect the new vaccine in the next week. WPA Pool / Getty Images

Texas can expect to receive the first 200,000 doses of the coveted Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine this week. The company announced that it has started the rollout process on March 1 — after the FDA approved its Emergency Use Authorization.

The Center for Disease Control gave the developer, Janssen Pharmaceutical, the final greenlight Sunday, February 28.

What does that mean for Houston? Mayor Sylvester Turner said the Houston Health Department is also anticipated to be on the list to receive Johnson & Johnson doses within the next seven days.

"That will be a game changer," Turner said at an event on February 28 afternoon. "There will be more vaccines available in a shorter period of time. We anticipate that we will probably get a shipment in sometime this week that will add to the Pfizer [doses] that we are using at NRG."

Turner said other clinics with the Houston Health Department have been administering the Moderna vaccine.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine does have noticeable differences from the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, experts said.

The MRNA vaccines each require two shots which are usually delivered weeks apart and stored in freezers. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a single shot that can be stored in a refrigerator for up to three months at 35 to 46 degrees.

However, Johnson & Johnson does not have as much of the COVID-19 vaccine produced as originally anticipated. ABC13 confirmed 3.9 million doses will be shipped out across the country this week. Johnson & Johnson announced roughly an additional 16 million doses by the end of the month.

"In the next few weeks, it won't have much of any impact because they only have at least three or four million doses available, and that's disappointing news," says Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. "In the longer term, over the next few months, it's really important because we need a greater vaccine supply. We are not going to get there with the two MRNA vaccines. We need probably up to five different vaccines in order to vaccinate the American people."

Recently, there has been a decline in COVID-19 hospitalizations and COVID-19 cases reported statewide. As of Sunday, about 5,700 Texans are in the hospital due to COVID-19, which is half the number of hospitalization in the beginning of the month.

Infectious disease epidemiologist Dr. Catherine Troisi says it's important for people to not let their guard down and that people should get tested if they have been in a high-exposure situation, or if they have been in direct contact with someone who has tested positive.

"Get vaccinated, don't worry about what vaccine it is," Dr. Troisi notes. "It's true that unfortunately there are not as many doses right now of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine as we have hoped, but the company is saying that by the end of June, they will have a 100 million doses, and that's into 100 million people because you don't need two doses.

"So, we expect to have 600 million doses of the other two vaccines, that's 300 million people," she continues. "That should be enough for everyone who wants the vaccine to be able to get it. With one caveat and that is as of right now we do not have a vaccine for children under age 16. Those trials are going on, hopefully as we go throughout the year there will be a vaccine licensed to 12 year-olds and then maybe going down to 8 years or older."

For more details on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine rollout, visit the FDA's website.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap. For more on this story, visit our news partner ABC13.

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