Move over, Austin

Houston named among top 10 cities for tech professionals

This new report doesn't include any of the country's top tech hubs. Photo by Hero Images

Silicon Valley, San Francisco, and Austin may grab lots of glory as American tech hubs, but Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio blast past all three of them in a new assessment of the top cities for tech workers.

Personal finance website SmartAsset combed through five data factors for 201 U.S. cities — average salary, average cost of living, concentration of tech employment, jobless rate, and average pay versus average tech pay — to come up with its 2018 ranking of the top U.S. cities for tech workers.

Houston comes in at No. 10, up from No. 15 in 2017. As SmartAsset points out, federal data shows the typical tech worker in Houston makes $94,200 a year — 75 percent more than the typical Houston worker.

"One concern, though, if you live in Houston — a bachelor's degree is no guarantee of employment," the report from SmartAsset says.

Why? About 3.6 percent of residents who have bachelor's degrees are unemployed, according to SmartAsset.

Dallas comes in at No. 3, and San Antonio ranks No. 8. Austin is No. 19 on the list, which is up from No. 20 last year.

Topping SmartAsset's ranking is Columbus, Ohio, followed by Des Moines, Iowa. It's worth noting that Silicon Valley and San Francisco didn't crack the top 25, thanks in large part to the high cost of living in that region.

---

This story originally appeared on CultureMap.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

Tvardi Therapeutics Inc. has fresh funds to support its drug's advancement in clinical trials. Photo via Getty Images

A Houston-based clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company has raised millions in its latest round.

Tvardi Therapeutics Inc. closed its $74 million series B funding round led by new investors New York-based Slate Path Capital, Florida-based Palkon Capital, Denver-based ArrowMark Partners, and New York-based 683 Capital, with continued support and participation by existing investors, including Houston-based Sporos Bioventures.

"We are thrilled to move out of stealth mode and partner with this lineup of long-term institutional investors," says Imran Alibhai, CEO at Tvardi. "With this financing we are positioned to advance the clinical development of our small molecule inhibitors of STAT3 into mid-stage trials as well as grow our team."

Through Slate Path Capital's investment, Jamie McNab, partner at the firm, will join Tvardi's board of directors.

"Tvardi is the leader in the field of STAT3 biology and has compelling proof of concept clinical data," McNab says in the release. "I look forward to partnering with the management team to advance Tvardi's mission to develop a new class of breakthrough medicines for cancer, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis."

Tvardi's latest fundraise will go toward supporting the company's products in their mid-stage trials for cancer and fibrosis. According to the release, Tvardi's lead product, TTI-101, is being studied in a Phase 1 trial of patients with advanced solid tumors who have failed all lines of therapy. So far, the drug has been well-received and shown multiple durable radiographic objective responses in the cancer patients treated.

Dr. Keith Flaherty, who is a member of Tvardi's scientific advisory board and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, offered his support of the company.

"STAT3 is a compelling and validated target. Beyond its clinical activity, Tvardi's lead molecule, TTI-101, has demonstrated direct downregulation of STAT3 in patients," he says in the release. "As a physician, I am eager to see the potential of Tvardi's molecules in diseases of high unmet medical need where STAT3 is a key driver."

Trending News