Move over, Austin

Houston named among top 10 cities for tech professionals

This new report doesn't include any of the country's top tech hubs. Photo by Hero Images

Silicon Valley, San Francisco, and Austin may grab lots of glory as American tech hubs, but Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio blast past all three of them in a new assessment of the top cities for tech workers.

Personal finance website SmartAsset combed through five data factors for 201 U.S. cities — average salary, average cost of living, concentration of tech employment, jobless rate, and average pay versus average tech pay — to come up with its 2018 ranking of the top U.S. cities for tech workers.

Houston comes in at No. 10, up from No. 15 in 2017. As SmartAsset points out, federal data shows the typical tech worker in Houston makes $94,200 a year — 75 percent more than the typical Houston worker.

"One concern, though, if you live in Houston — a bachelor's degree is no guarantee of employment," the report from SmartAsset says.

Why? About 3.6 percent of residents who have bachelor's degrees are unemployed, according to SmartAsset.

Dallas comes in at No. 3, and San Antonio ranks No. 8. Austin is No. 19 on the list, which is up from No. 20 last year.

Topping SmartAsset's ranking is Columbus, Ohio, followed by Des Moines, Iowa. It's worth noting that Silicon Valley and San Francisco didn't crack the top 25, thanks in large part to the high cost of living in that region.

---

This story originally appeared on CultureMap.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

Mike Francis, co-founder of NanoTech, joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss his plans to fireproof California. Photo courtesy of NanoTech

A few years ago, Mike Francis caught a video of a man's hand coated in some sort of material and placed over a fire. Nothing was happening to the man's hand — the coating completely protected it — but something was happening in Francis's brain, and a year ago he founded Nanotech Inc.

Based in Houston, NanoTech' is focused on reducing energy waste by proper insulation within the construction industry — a half inch of NanoTech's material is the equivalent of 30 inches of fiberglass. However, perhaps more important to Francis is the life-saving capability the product provides in terms of fireproofing.

"We're working with all of the major players in the state of California to not only fireproof the utility infrastructure, but eventually homes and businesses," Francis says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "Our goal, if we're looking into the future, is to fireproof that state — and we're working with the right people and companies to make it happen."

To the best of his knowledge, Francis says NanoTech is the only company this far along working on this goal. Millions of utility poles go up in flames as the forest fires sweep through the state, and coating them with NanoTech could help prevent this damage.

Of course, as the company grows, Francis is lucky to have the support and the funds behind him and his team. Earlier this year, Halliburton selected NanoTech as the inaugural member of Halliburton Labs. For the past few months, NanoTech has been based in the labs, receiving hands-on support, and NanoTech will join the year-long inaugural cohort of 15 or so companies in 2021.

NanoTech also has a new member to its support system — and $5 million — following the close of its seed round led by Austin-based Ecliptic Capital. Francis says he was looking for an investor to bring new expertise the company doesn't have yet, and Ecliptic will be crucial to growing globally.

"Those first investors, especially in your seed round, are critical to your growth," says Francis. "We're so excited to be partnering with Ecliptic — we just trusted them."

Francis shares more about fundraising during a pandemic and what being based at Halliburton has meant for his company's growth. Listen to the full interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


Trending News