Move over, Austin

Houston named among top 10 cities for tech professionals

This new report doesn't include any of the country's top tech hubs. Photo by Hero Images

Silicon Valley, San Francisco, and Austin may grab lots of glory as American tech hubs, but Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio blast past all three of them in a new assessment of the top cities for tech workers.

Personal finance website SmartAsset combed through five data factors for 201 U.S. cities — average salary, average cost of living, concentration of tech employment, jobless rate, and average pay versus average tech pay — to come up with its 2018 ranking of the top U.S. cities for tech workers.

Houston comes in at No. 10, up from No. 15 in 2017. As SmartAsset points out, federal data shows the typical tech worker in Houston makes $94,200 a year — 75 percent more than the typical Houston worker.

"One concern, though, if you live in Houston — a bachelor's degree is no guarantee of employment," the report from SmartAsset says.

Why? About 3.6 percent of residents who have bachelor's degrees are unemployed, according to SmartAsset.

Dallas comes in at No. 3, and San Antonio ranks No. 8. Austin is No. 19 on the list, which is up from No. 20 last year.

Topping SmartAsset's ranking is Columbus, Ohio, followed by Des Moines, Iowa. It's worth noting that Silicon Valley and San Francisco didn't crack the top 25, thanks in large part to the high cost of living in that region.

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This story originally appeared on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

A COVID-19 treatment is entering into the next phase of testing. Photo via Getty Images

A clinical stage pharmaceutical company based in Houston has entered into the next phase of testing out a drug that could be used to treat COVID-19.

Moleculin Biotech Inc. has tapped an independent lab to examine the antiviral activity of its WP1122 portfolio in a COVID-19 animal model. The drug was originally developed as a cancer-fighting glycolysis inhibitor and submitted for its COVID-19 treatment patent in April.

"With in vivo studies for the treatment of COVID-19 in such high demand, we are excited to begin an in vivo study involving our WP1122 portfolio," says Walter Klemp, chairman and CEO of Moleculin, in a press release. "Even though we may have initial observations earlier, having the final data readout in December will push the estimated window for filing an Investigational New Drug application into 2021.

"We are also planning to conduct other in vivo studies, intended to enable us to file a complete IND with the US Food and Drug Administration."

The in vivo study, which would use the lab's hamster model and SARS-CoV-2. Moleculin Biotech expects to have the data from the study in December.

"We are excited about the additional in vitro testing as this will involve more than one molecule from our WP1122 anitmetabolite portfolio against SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses," says Klemp.

Moleculin Biotech was founded by Klemp in 2007 and went public in 2016. The company is based in the Memorial Park area of Houston.

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