my space

Houston entrepreneur creates a portable workspace for productivity on the go

Alcove transforms from a laptop case to a private workspace in just a few moves. Courtesy of Alcove

By 2020, almost half of the American workforce will be freelance or contract employees. To prepare for this new way of doing business, innovators have been abuzz with coming up with software and AI workplace solutions.

However, Yared Akalou, a Houston entrepreneur, took a step back from the digital solutions sprouting up everywhere, and he designed a tangible tool for remote workers to have their own private workspace amid a loud coffee house or busy coworking space.

Alcove goes from laptop case to personal workspace with just a few moves. The wings pop out, the top lifts, and a kickstand holds the case upright while ergonomically holds up the laptop at a 40- to 45-degree angle. Akalou even consulted with an acoustic engineer to ensure the materials are optimized for users.

"Our goal is threefold," Akalou says, "to enhance privacy, increase focus, and improve communications within your laptop."

Akalou formed his LLC in March 2017 and went straight into prototypes and market research, before launching his Kickstarter campaign in September 2017 from his booth at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco. He more than met his goal of $20,000 and just completed all the preorders for Alcove.

Now, Alcove has direct presales available for order on its website, which is relaunching this month. However, Akalou has big plans for what he wants to do next. First, he wants to tap into distributors to carry his product — the Best Buys and Brookstones of the world. Next, he wants to have B2B partnerships with big companies to get Alcove in the hands of their employees.

"When you start as a consultant for Accenture for example," Akalou says, "they give you a company laptop and a briefcase. That briefcase ends up in the back of your closet. Alcove would be a more useful product."

In addition to getting this current product on shelves and in the hands of remote workers, Akalou has a product roadmap for several other tools. He wants Alcove to be a complete line of hardware, so to speak, for workplace solutions.


Alcove can even be its own shoulder bag when you're on the go.Courtesy of Alcove

Houston was home to more than 117,000 skilled freelancers in 2018. Photo courtesy of Common Desk

It's no wonder coworking is taking off in Houston. A new study shows the community of skilled freelance workers in Houston ranks as one of the biggest in Texas — and the United States.

The study, commissioned by freelance marketplace Fiverr and conducted by market research firm Rockbridge Associates, indicates Houston was home to an estimated 117,260 skilled freelancers who generated more than $4.1 billion in revenue in 2018, just slightly less than the financial haul in 2017.

Houston ranked second statewide and 11th in the U.S. among major metro areas for the size of the skilled-freelancer workforce and for the amount of revenue produced, according to the study. Between 2017 and 2018, Houston's pool of skilled freelancers grew 2.5 percent.

From 2011 to 2016, according to the study, Houston's community of skilled freelancers increased 7.7 percent, while revenue declined slightly by 7.8 percent. The Fiverr study places skilled freelancers in three buckets: creative, technical, and professional. These freelancers include attorneys, graphic designers, musicians, software engineers, accountants, and consultants. Any self-employed person whose work requires "specific skills and abilities" was counted in the study; excluded were folks like Uber and Lyft drivers.

"Highly skilled freelancers are an understudied and often overlooked segment of the workforce," Brent Messenger, Fiverr's vice president of public policy and community, says in a release. "By analyzing the data around these … workers, we're able to get a clear picture of the types of jobs they're doing, the amount of revenue they're generating, and the cities in which they're having the most impact."

DFW ranked first in Texas and seventh nationally in the study. In 2018, DFW was home to an estimated 154,617 skilled freelancers who generated nearly $6.38 billion in revenue in 2018, up 5.4 percent from the previous year.

While DFW dominates Texas in terms of freelance population and revenue, Austin boasts the fastest-growing freelance scene.

In 2018, the estimated 67,044 skilled freelancers in the Austin metro area produced nearly $2.7 billion in revenue, up 7.5 percent from 2017, the study says. During the one-year period, Austin's pool of skilled freelancers grew 7.4 percent. The study pegged Austin at No. 18 nationally for the size of the population and revenue of skilled freelancers.

From 2011 to 2016, according to the study, Austin's community of skilled freelancers shot up by 26 percent, with revenue climbing 31 percent. The study identified Austin and Nashville as the country's two fastest-growing hubs for skilled freelancers.

A recent study by commercial real estate website CommercialCafé found that Austin, Dallas, and Houston ranked among the most affordable U.S. cities for freelancers. Meanwhile, personal finance website NerdWallet in 2016 ranked Austin as the best place in the U.S. for freelancers, with Dallas at No. 3, Fort Worth at No. 8, and Houston at No. 15.

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A version of this story originally appeared on CultureMap.com.