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Houston-based personal training company partners with NASA for out-of-this-world opportunity

Jay Sutaria's personal training business is partnering with NASA to provide clients training fit for an astronaut. Blake Hobson/ST&F

Not everyone one can be an astronaut, but you might get to use their equipment. Sutaria Training & Fitness LLC, a Houston-based personal training company, is teaming up with one of the leading biomechanics that contracts with NASA that aims to provide exclusive access to astronaut training equipment to clients.

Jay Sutaria, founder and lead trainer, says that the equipment at NASA, called the force plate, shows how much power a client's body is producing in specific areas and how that power drops over time. The data produced by these machines can help trainers customize and tweak workouts for each client to take training a step further.

The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device, or ARED, works with the force plates Sutaria uses, and according to NASA's website, ARED includes force sensors located in the platform that are able to record force in three dimensions.

Sutaria and his contact at NASA recently tested the equipment with the Chinese olympic boxing team to see how it can be applied to workouts at NASA's location in Clear Lake.

"It's exclusive access to the equipment that is not available openly in Houston," said Sutaria. "NASA is a reference for us to become better trainers."

Sutaria founded his company in 2011 while he was a student at the University of Houston, and the company now operates with two trainers. His clients include professional athletes such as D.J. Augustin (Orlando Magic, NBA); and Tim Frazier (New Orleans Pelicans, NBA), however, Sutaria and his team offer professional personal training services to any type of athlete.

He says that his passion towards healing sports injuries stems from a back injury he suffered from throughout high school that greatly affected his performance. Sutaria had gone to physical therapy to repair the injury, but was trained incorrectly, which lead to more pain. After studying kinesiology and exercise science, he was able to fix his own chronic pain and help others like him.

"When I went into college with this physical therapy mindset, I wanted to help people get out of pain," Sutaria said.

In addition to his degree, Sutaria and all of the trainers on his team have diplomas from the National Personal Training Institute. Sutaria says that the trainers approach is data and science driven, focusing on a series of fundamental exercise movement and coaching.

"We've already helped hundreds of people, if you can help one person it's good for your community," said Sutaria.

ST&F is working to strengthen corporate partnerships, where the personal training company would offer mobility stretching training and nutritional guidance. He wants to open a gym this year; the company currently offers services out of Next Level Fitness in West University. The new gym will likely contain special equipment used at NASA, taking the collaboration even further. For now, clients that are interested in testing the equipment will have to travel to Clear Lake.

In addition to the permanent location, services are available in the Bellaire, River Oaks, Galleria, Heights, Sugar Land, Spring, Midtown, and Downtown neighborhoods, according to the website, and while Sutaria isn't writing off plans to expand to other cities, the company will remain focused on Houston for now.

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Houston-based imaware, which has an at-home COVID-19 testing process, is working with Texas A&M University on researching how the virus affects the human body. Getty Images

An ongoing medical phenomenon is determining how COVID-19 affects people differently — especially in terms of severity. A new partnership between a Houston-based digital health platform and Texas A&M University is looking into differences in individual risk factors for the virus.

Imaware, which launched its at-home coronavirus testing kit in April, is using its data and information collected from the testing process for this new study on how the virus affects patients differently.

"As patient advocates, we want to aid in the search to understand more about why some patients are more vulnerable than others to the deadly complications of COVID-19," says Jani Tuomi, co-founder of imaware, in a press release. "Our current sample collection process is an efficient way to provide longitudinal prospectively driven data for research and to our knowledge, is the only such approach that is collecting, assessing, and biobanking specimens in real time."

Imaware uses a third-party lab to conduct the tests at patients' homes following the Center for Disease Control's guidelines and protocol. During the test, the medical professional takes additional swabs for the study. The test is then conducted by Austin-based Wheel, a telemedicine group.

Should the patient receive positive COVID-19 results, they are contacted by a representative of Wheel with further instructions. They are also called by a member of a team led by Dr. Rebecca Fischer, an infectious disease expert and epidemiologist and laboratory scientist at the Texas A&M University School of Public Health, to grant permission to be a part of the study.

Once a part of the study, the patient remains in contact with Fischer's team, which tracks the spread and conditions of the virus in the patient. One thing the researchers are looking for is the patients' responses to virus complications caused by an overabundance of cytokines, according to the press release. Cytokines are proteins in the body that fight viruses and infections, and, if not working properly, they can "trigger an over-exuberant inflammatory response" that can cause potentially deadly issues with lung and organ failure or worse, per the release.

"We believe strongly in supporting this research, as findings from the field can be implemented to improve clinical processes-- helping even more patients," says Wheel's executive medical director, Dr. Rafid Fadul.

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