Next level

Houston-based personal training company partners with NASA for out-of-this-world opportunity

Jay Sutaria's personal training business is partnering with NASA to provide clients training fit for an astronaut. Blake Hobson/ST&F

Not everyone one can be an astronaut, but you might get to use their equipment. Sutaria Training & Fitness LLC, a Houston-based personal training company, is teaming up with one of the leading biomechanics that contracts with NASA that aims to provide exclusive access to astronaut training equipment to clients.

Jay Sutaria, founder and lead trainer, says that the equipment at NASA, called the force plate, shows how much power a client's body is producing in specific areas and how that power drops over time. The data produced by these machines can help trainers customize and tweak workouts for each client to take training a step further.

The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device, or ARED, works with the force plates Sutaria uses, and according to NASA's website, ARED includes force sensors located in the platform that are able to record force in three dimensions.

Sutaria and his contact at NASA recently tested the equipment with the Chinese olympic boxing team to see how it can be applied to workouts at NASA's location in Clear Lake.

"It's exclusive access to the equipment that is not available openly in Houston," said Sutaria. "NASA is a reference for us to become better trainers."

Sutaria founded his company in 2011 while he was a student at the University of Houston, and the company now operates with two trainers. His clients include professional athletes such as D.J. Augustin (Orlando Magic, NBA); and Tim Frazier (New Orleans Pelicans, NBA), however, Sutaria and his team offer professional personal training services to any type of athlete.

He says that his passion towards healing sports injuries stems from a back injury he suffered from throughout high school that greatly affected his performance. Sutaria had gone to physical therapy to repair the injury, but was trained incorrectly, which lead to more pain. After studying kinesiology and exercise science, he was able to fix his own chronic pain and help others like him.

"When I went into college with this physical therapy mindset, I wanted to help people get out of pain," Sutaria said.

In addition to his degree, Sutaria and all of the trainers on his team have diplomas from the National Personal Training Institute. Sutaria says that the trainers approach is data and science driven, focusing on a series of fundamental exercise movement and coaching.

"We've already helped hundreds of people, if you can help one person it's good for your community," said Sutaria.

ST&F is working to strengthen corporate partnerships, where the personal training company would offer mobility stretching training and nutritional guidance. He wants to open a gym this year; the company currently offers services out of Next Level Fitness in West University. The new gym will likely contain special equipment used at NASA, taking the collaboration even further. For now, clients that are interested in testing the equipment will have to travel to Clear Lake.

In addition to the permanent location, services are available in the Bellaire, River Oaks, Galleria, Heights, Sugar Land, Spring, Midtown, and Downtown neighborhoods, according to the website, and while Sutaria isn't writing off plans to expand to other cities, the company will remain focused on Houston for now.

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Building Houston

 
 

Veronica Wu, founder of First Bight Ventures, recently announced new team members and her hopes for making Houston a leader in synthetic biology. Photo courtesy of First Bight Ventures

Since launching earlier this year, a Houston-based venture capital firm dedicated to investing in synthetic biology companies has made some big moves.

First Bight Ventures, founded by Veronica Wu, announced its growing team and plans to stand up a foundry and accelerator for its portfolio companies and other synthetic biology startups in Houston. The firm hopes to make Houston an international leader in synthetic biology.

“We have a moment in time where we can make Houston the global epicenter of synthetic biology and the bio economy," Wu says to a group of stakeholders last week at First Bight's Rocketing into the Bioeconomy event. "Whether its energy, semiconductor, space exploration, or winning the World Series — Houstonians lead. It’s in our DNA. While others look to the stars, we launch people into space.”

At First Bight's event, Wu introduced the company's new team members. Angela Wilkins, executive director of the Ken Kennedy Institute at Rice University, joined First Bight as partner, and Serafina Lalany, former executive director of Houston Exponential, was named entrepreneur in residence. Carlos Estrada, who has held leadership positions within WeWork in Houston, also joins the team as entrepreneur in residence and will oversee the company's foundry and accelerator that will be established to support synthetic biology startups, Wu says.

“First Bight is investing to bring the best and the brightest — and most promising — synthetic biology startups from around the country to Houston," Wu continues.

First Bighthas one seed-staged company announced in its portfolio. San Diego-based Persephone Biosciences was founded in 2017 by synthetic and metabolic engineering pioneers, Stephanie Culler and Steve Van Dien. The company is working on developing microbial products that impact patient and infant health.

Wu, who worked at Apple before the launch of the iPhone and Tesla before Elon Musk was a household name, says she saw what was happening in Houston after her brother moved to town. She first invested in Houston's synthetic biology ecosystem when she contributed to one of Solugen's fundraising rounds. The alternative plastics company is now a unicorn valued at over $1 billion.

“I founded First Bight because of what I see is the next great wave of technology innovation," she says at the event. "I founded it in Houston because the pieces are right here.”

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