Who's who

3 Houston innovators to know this week

This week's batch of innovators have had to be pretty creative in their industries. Courtesy photos

The ability to innovate lives in one's ability to think outside of the box — no matter the industry. This week's Houston innovators to know have had to get creative and think of new ways of doing things, from retailing to creating greeting cards.

Harvin Moore, president of Houston Exponential

Harvin Moore, who has a 20-year career in tech and innovation, has been named as president of Houston Exponential. Courtesy of HX

Harvin Moore has been a banker, an educator, an elected official, and more — but his newest title is president of Houston Exponential, which suits him just fine.

Now, under his new role, he's leading the nonprofit that's focused on connecting, promoting, and attracting within Houston's innovation ecosystem.

"There's no question that five years from now, or 10 years from now, Houston will be a very large and continually rapidly growing tech economy," Moore tells InnovationMap. "The question is just how fast it is going to get here." Read more.

Alex Kurkowski, founder of Tellinga

Alex Kurkowski wanted to tell a better story. Courtesy of Tellinga

Alex Kurkowski has a problem with traditional greeting cards.

"They're templated. They're frozen, stagnant, fixed in what they are," Kurkowski says. "They suck."

The Rice University MBA grad decided he would do something about it. He created his business, Tellinga — short for "telling a story" — to create a new avenue for people to communicate a message to their loved ones. Kurkowski has big plans for his company and the platform he's creating. Read more.

Steve Scala, executive vice president of corporate development for DiCentral

Steve Scala joined DiCentral in 2014 to focus on growing the company worldwide. Courtesy of DiCentral

Something's brewing in retail — and it's scaring the industry. Steve Scala writes in a guest column for InnovationMap that dropshipping — the process of shipping products direct from vendors to customers, cutting out warehouses and storage facilities — is only going to gain traction in the industry.

"The study found that approximately 88 percent of retailers see dropship as inevitable to long-term success," Scala writes. "According to 87 percent of those retailers surveyed also experienced an increase in revenue as a result of dropshipping. Customer service also benefitted from dropship, with 84 percent of retailers noting improvements to customer service after adopting the dropshipping fulfillment model." Read more.

This week's Houston innovators to know are Megan Eddings, Lance Black, and Todd Burke.

The city of Houston — much like most major cities in the country — is in crisis mode, with a stay-at-home mandate and rising COVID-19 case numbers.

But these three Houston innovators are emerging as leaders in making masks, discussing the importance of telemedicine at this time, and providing tips on keeping a stable supply chain.

Megan Eddings, founder of Accel Lifestyle

Photo courtesy of Accel Lifestyle

Former scientist Megan Eddings designed a fabric that doesn't hold onto bacteria, and she's launched an activewear brand of men's and women's T-shirts that don't stink. But when the coronavirus hit the country and medical professionals worried about personal protection equipment, Eddings sprung into action.

"We have enough supplies here to make 9,000 masks and I have 2,800 yards of fabric sitting at my factory in California," she says. "That's enough fabric to make more than 100,000 masks." Click here to read more about Houston fashion designers looking to help out.

Lance Black, associate director of TMCx

Photo courtesy of TMCx

Telemedicine has a unique opportunity during the coronavirus-cased shutdown. Lance Black, associate director of the Texas Medical Center's accelerator, TMCx, joined the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss the health tech potential as well as how startups are coping in this uncertain time.

"This is going to force the health care system to take a hard look at what these platforms are capable of doing," Black says in the episode. "And it's going to stress the capabilities of these companies. To be honest, if there's a silver lining, that is one of them in my mind, that this will prove out the technology [in telehealth.]" Click here to read more and stream the episode.

Todd Burke, president at Smith and Associates

Photo courtesy of Smith and Associates

The COVID-19 outbreak has already greatly affected supply chains across industries, and companies should keep moving forward with that in mind. Todd Burke, president at Houston-based Smith and Associates gives three tips for properly managing your supply chain during the coronavirus outbreak in a guest article.

"During my 23 years at Smith, the world's largest open-market distributor of electronic components, I've witnessed various market disruptions and shifting supply chain dynamics," writes Burke. "I can confidently say that the coronavirus outbreak is heavily uncharted territory for the technology industry." Click here to read more.