ready to pitch

Houston health tech company tapped for prestigious pediatric medical device competition

Houston-based CorInnova is gearing up to pitch at a prestigious event. Photo via CorInnova.com

Houston-based medtech company CorInnova is gearing up for what could be a big payday.

CorInnova is among five medtech companies that have been invited to present pitches in October for the National Capital Consortium for Pediatric Device Innovation’s “Make Your Medical Device Pitch for Kids!” competition.

CorInnova and the four other finalists now have access to a four-month pediatric accelerator program led by MedTech Innovator and will vie for a share of $150,000 in grant funding from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The pitch event is part of the 10th annual Symposium on Pediatric Device Innovation.

“Addressing unmet needs across pediatric populations is critical to advancing children’s health, and we are delighted to once again work with pioneering companies that seek to bridge this care gap,” says Kolaeh Eskandanian, president and chief innovation officer at Children’s National Hospital and principal investigator for the pediatric device consortium.

CorInnova has developed a minimally invasive device for the treatment of congestive heart failure. Specifically, CorInnova’s soft, flexible device can be inserted through a 1-inch incision to increase the amount of blood pumping in the heart by 50 percent.

The device’s primary benefit is that there’s no contact with blood, thus minimizing complications when the device is being used. Blood contact during a heart procedure can increase the risk of health problems such as stroke and kidney disfunction.

“The device is collapsible, allowing it to be delivered and secured to the heart in a minimally invasive manner. The device conforms to the heart’s surface, and gently compresses the heart to increase cardiac output using an external pneumatic driver that operates in synchrony with the heartbeat,” CorInnova explains on its website.

In the U.S., around 40,000 babies are born each year with congenital heart defects. About one-fourth of these newborns have critical defects, often prompting the need for surgery or other procedures.

Since being founded in 2004, CorInnova has raised at least $6.3 million, according to Crunchbase. This includes a $6.1 million investment from Wellcome Trust, a London-based charitable foundation that focuses on biomedical research.

Aside from the MedTech Innovator accelerator, CorInnova has participated in the TMC Accelerator’s fall 2019 accelerator program for medical device makers and the fall 2018 gBETA Medtech accelerator program.

The four other finalists in the medtech pitch competition are:

  • La Palma, California-based Innovation Lab, whose mechanical elbow brace stabilizes tremors in some pediatric patients with cerebral palsy.
  • Biddeford, Maine-based Prapela, whose vibrating pad helps treat apnea in newborns.
  • Richmond, Virginia-based Tympanogen, whose nonsurgical procedure takes the place of surgery for eardrum repair.
  • Xpan of Concord, Ontario, Canada, whose universal trocar (a surgical instrument) improves safety, access, and flexibility during various procedures.

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Building Houston

 
 

Here's what Houston research news dominated this year on InnovationMap. Photo via Getty Images

Editor's note: As 2022 comes to a close, InnovationMap is looking back at the year's top stories in Houston innovation. In many cases, innovative startups originate from meticulous research deep within institutions. This past year, InnovationMap featured stories on these research institutions — from their breakthrough innovations to funding fueling it all. Here are five Houston research-focused articles that stood out to readers this year — be sure to click through to read the full story.


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Reddy is leaving his position as chief of hematology-oncology and deputy director at the University of Michigan’s Rogel Cancer Center to become director of the Baylor College of Medicine’s Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. C. Kent Osborne stepped down as the center’s director in 2020; Dr. Helen Heslop has been the interim director. Continue reading.

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Over a dozen Houston researchers wrapped up 2021 with the news of fresh funding thanks to an initiative and investment fund from Rice University.

The Technology Development Fund is a part of the university’s Creative Ventures initiative, which has awarded more than $4 million in grants since its inception in 2016. Rice's Office of Technology Transfer orchestrated the $25,000 grants across nine projects. Submissions were accepted through October and the winners were announced a few weeks ago. Continue reading.

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Traditional solar thermophotovoltaics (STPVs), or the engines used to extract electrical power from thermal radiation, run at an efficiency limit of 85.4 percent, according to a statement from UH. Zhao and Ghalekohneh's system was able to reach a rate of 93.3 percent, also known as the Landsberg Limit. Continue reading.

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Chemical researchers at seven institutions in the Houston area are receiving nearly $12.9 million grants from the Houston-based Welch Foundation.

In the Houston area, 43 grants are going to seven institutions:

  • Baylor College of Medicine
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