HOUSTON INNOVATORS PODCAST EPISODE 23

Former founder wants to make Houston a major femtech hub

In this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast, Brittany Barreto discusses her passion for femtech domination as well as expert info for founders looking to get involved with Capital Factory. Photo courtesy of Brittany Barreto

Brittany Barreto has had a rollercoaster of a year. She went from a startup founder in her second round of funding to sitting on the other side of that fundraising table.

Barreto, who is the venture associate at Capital Factory, has a Ph.D in genetics and founded the first nationwide DNA-based dating app called Pheramor. Last year, she had to close down the business due to changes in Apple's App Store's rules. Now that she's shifted from founder to helping founders, she's realized Houston needs more former-founder mentors like herself.

"I actually think Houston needs to figure out how to capitalize on these recycled founders and how to get them in more mentorship and leadership positions," Barreto says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "We're in Houston, Texas, and the second question out of everyone's mouths is, 'How can I help you?'"

But that willingness to help only takes mentorship so far for founders who can learn a lot from people who've been in their exact position.

While she wants to see more of these types of mentors emerging in Houston, she also wants to see more of something else: Femtech. These types of startups focus on technology that improves the health and wellness of women, and Houston is poised to be a great hub for femtech — mainly because, well, nowhere else is yet.

Femtech has a lot of potential for investors and success because it's creating technology that's an aspirin and not a vitamin, Barreto says. People won't necessarily pay for and take vitamins, but when they need that aspirin, they'll pay what they can for it.

"Whenever I hear about new femtech companies, I think, 'why doesn't this exist yet?'" Barreto says. "That's why I'm really passionate about FemTech, because it's not something that's just nice to have."

Houston has several female-focused organizations that have emerged lately, but the next steps for the city as it develops as a hub for femtech is to establish a femtech-focused accelerator program and venture fund.

Barreto shares her thoughts on Houston, plus explains what makes Capital Factory different from other organizations in Houston. She also gives her advice on pitchdecks and how she's looking to better connect the dots between entrepreneurs and startup development organizations on the podcast. Listen to the full episode below — or wherever you get your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.

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Building Houston

 
 

A new report says Houston “is poised for further growth” in life sciences. Photo via Getty Images

Houston is receiving more kudos for its robust life sciences sector.

Bayou City lands at No. 13 in JLL’s 2022 ranking of the country’s top 15 metro areas for life sciences. JLL says Houston “is poised for further growth” in life sciences.

Here’s how Houston fares in each of the ranking’s three categories:

  • No. 12 for supply of life sciences-oriented commercial real estate
  • No. 14 for access to life sciences talent
  • No. 15 for life sciences grant funding and venture capital

Earlier this year, Houston scored a 13th-place ranking on a list released by JLL competitor CBRE of the country’s top 25 life sciences markets. Meanwhile, commercial real estate platform CommercialCafe recently placed Houston at No. 10 among the top U.S. metros for life sciences.

JLL applauds Houston for strong growth in the amount of life sciences talent along with “an impressive base of research institutions and medical centers.” But it faults Houston for limited VC interest in life sciences startups and a small inventory of lab space.

“Houston is getting a boost [in life sciences] from the growing Texas Medical Center and an influx of venture capital earmarked for life sciences research,” the Greater Houston Partnership recently noted.

Boston appears at No. 1 in this year’s JLL ranking, followed by the San Francisco Bay Area, San Diego, Washington, D.C./Baltimore, and Philadelphia.

Last year’s JLL list included only 10 life sciences markets; Houston wasn’t among them.

“The long-term potential of the sector remains materially unchanged since 2021,” Travis McCready, head of life sciences for JLL’s Americas markets, says in a news release.

“Innovation is happening at a more rapid pace than ever before, the fruits of research into cell and gene therapy are just now being harvested, and revenue growth has taken off in the past five years as the sector becomes larger, an atypical growth track.”

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