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Apple announces $1 billion Texas campus

Apple's current facilities in North Austin. Photo courtesy of Apple

Apple is embarking on a massive expansion in the Austin area. On December 13, the Cupertino, California-based company announced it is investing $1 billion to create a North Austin campus and adding 5,000 potential new jobs.

Though an exact location was not revealed, the company said the new 113-acre campus will be located "less than a mile" from its current office on Parmer Lane near the Domain. Initially the new Austin Apple will be designed to accommodate 5,000 employees, with the possibility to grow to up to 15,000 employees, the company says.

According to a release, the new facilities will house a broad range of job functions, including engineering, R&D, operations, finance, sales, and customer support. Currently, Apple employs 6,200 Austinites, the largest group outside of the tech company's California headquarters.

"Apple has been a vital part of the Austin community for a quarter century, and we are thrilled that they are deepening their investment in our people and the city we love," said Mayor Steve Adler in a news release. "Apple and Austin share a creative spark and a commitment to getting big things done. We share their commitment to diversity and inclusion. We're excited they are bringing more middle-skilled jobs to the area."

Apple says the new North Austin property will also feature 50 acres of preserved open space, and will be run on 100-percent renewable energy.

Austin isn't the only city receiving a windfall. Apple says that in addition to creating a new Capital City campus, it plans to add 1,000 new jobs in Seattle, San Diego, and Culver City (near Los Angeles). It's also making a dedicated push into other cities and promising to bring "hundreds" of jobs to Pittsburgh; New York; Boulder; Boston; and Portland, Oregon. The company also recently announced a new office in Nashville.

"Apple is proud to bring new investment, jobs, and opportunity to cities across the United States and to significantly deepen our quarter-century partnership with the city and people of Austin," said Apple CEO Tim Cook. "Talent, creativity, and tomorrow's breakthrough ideas aren't limited by region or zip code, and, with this new expansion, we're redoubling our commitment to cultivating the high-tech sector and workforce nationwide."

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This story originally appeared on CultureMap.

Where are all those new Newstonians coming from? Texas. Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images

A new study shows Texas' major metros are some of the hottest places to move to in the U.S. — and Houston tops them all.

Real estate site CommercialCafe recently looked at "metro-to-metro" migration to see which areas are "winning" in terms of new residents, and a trio of Lone Star cities appears in the top five.

With an average net gain of 32,821 residents, Houston ranks third overall. Dallas-Fort Worth, with an average net gain of 30,639, follows at fourth. And Austin, with an average net gain of 26,733 people, is fifth. (The migration data was based on U.S. Census yearly average estimates for 2013-2017.)

"Among the three Texas metros on our list, Houston saw the largest population increase through metro-to-metro migration," says the report.

So where are these new residents coming from? Elsewhere in Texas. Houston gained the most new residents from DFW (16,306), followed by Austin (9,304) and San Antonio (7,443).

Those are also the most popular locations for Houston residents to move to. On average, more than 15,000 Houston residents relocated to DFW, followed closely by Austin (14,082) and San Antonio (8,692).

Houston's growth "is visible in Space City's many business districts, which added almost 18 million square feet of office space between 2013 and 2017, according to Yardi Matrix data," says the report. "This amount surpasses that of any other metro in the top 10. The Houston housing market is also on the upswing. The number of housing units here increased by an average of 2.1 percent — or 52,841 units — each year."

Outside of Texas, the report shows that folks are flocking to Phoenix (No. 1) and California's Inland Empire (No. 2).

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.