Houston Voices

Houston-founded startups — are you in the right city for growth?

Choosing the right city in which to launch your startup can make or break your company. Miguel Tovar/University of Houston

Choosing the best city for your startup can mean the difference between success and closing up shop prematurely. It's important to think outside your home city for a startup launch because your home city may not have the ecosystem set up for your particular startup.

If you give in to your emotions; staying in your hometown because it's, well, your hometown, you risk preventing your company from launching in a city more conducive to its growth.

Here are three keys to making sure you choose the right city for your startup.

A city's ecosystem

Few things are more valuable to a new company than a web of like-minded companies, investors, social groups and connections. You want a city that uses its resources to grow and maintain its startups. Whether it be accelerators or pitching events or entrepreneur conferences, the city you choose needs to be active in the startup community. Establishing your startup in a city with a weak ecosystem will halt the growth of your company because it'll be that much harder to boost your company without a city's support.

A city's social network

A city with a robust social circle of like-minded entrepreneurs is a city that is doing something right for startups. First of all, if the city is rich in like-minded entrepreneurs, then that means they are living there. So there has to be a reason for that: the city is startup-friendly. Second, a city with a strong social sphere of startups means you have more opportunities to make connections and network. You can meet with other business owners to discuss issues important to your companies and even learn new things from each other. What's more is you have a chance to work with other companies to help each other grow. The city of New Orleans has Krewe de Nieux, for example. This social group is a resource for over forty technology startups in the city.

A chance to give back

Opportunities to give back. The best city for your startup will have plenty of opportunities to give back. For example, giving high school students real-life work experience to expand their knowledge and prepare them for a career in the field. A city with a plethora of opportunities like charities, youth groups, internships and career and business organizations allows startups to barter: we will give you experience and you can help us get work done. You help each other grow. In doing so, you blossom the city's startup community as a whole.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea.

Rene Cantu is the writer and editor at UH Division of Research.

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Building Houston

 
 

We could all use a little IT help right now. Photo by Maskot/Getty

Though it's been around since 2012, JPMorgan Chase's Force for Good program feels especially vital right now. The project connects Chase employee volunteers with hundreds of nonprofits around the world to build sustainable tech solutions that help advance their missions.

Even better, Houston and Dallas nonprofits have a leg up in the selection process. Organizations located in or near one of Chase's tech centers get priority, and that includes H-Town and Big D.

The government-registered nonprofits, foundations, and social enterprises (we're talking everything from food banks to theater companies) selected to participate will have access to a team of up to 10 highly skilled technologists, who will spend approximately four hours per week advising over an eight month period.

Each nonprofit is asked to propose the specific project that would benefit from technology guidance, and it needs to be something the organization can maintain when the project period is over.

"We have more than 50,000 technologists at JPMorgan Chase around the world and they're passionate about giving back," says Ed Boden, global lead of Technology for Social Good programs. "Force for Good gives our employees the opportunity to utilize their unique skills while also learning new ones, to build technology solutions for the organizations that need it most."

If you're the director, CEO, or other person in charge at a nonprofit and you still have questions about Force for Good, Chase has put together a free webinar to help explain further.

These webinars cover the overall program experience and application process, and it's highly recommended that nonprofits watch before applying. The live webinar dates (with Texas times) are June 2 from 1:30-2:30 pm and June 8 from 10:30-11:30 am.

A pre-recorded webinar will also be available for nonprofits to review after the live webinar dates.

Since 2012, Force for Good has worked with over 320 organizations in 22 cities, contributing over 190,500 hours of knowledge and skills.

"It is a great program that can provide strong impact for nonprofit organizations that need technology help," says Chris Rapp, a Dallas-based Chase executive. "As a father and husband of two Dallas artists, I am a huge believer in helping the arts grow and hopefully we can help do this through Force For Good."

The application process opened on May 28, with a deadline to submit by July 10.

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