coogs care

University of Houston prescribes homeless relief with new free clinic

UH nursing students will care for the homeless in a new clinic. Photo via uh.edu

Houston is no stranger to the plague of homelessness and now, a major university has a prescription for some relief.

The University of Houston College of Nursing will open its new Nursing Health Clinic in Midtown on September 13, the school announced. Notably, this new nurse-managed facility will target the health needs of homeless people.

Clients will be seen in the Abraham Center of St. Paul's United Methodist Church (5401 Fannin St.).

Dr. David Buck, associate dean of community health at the UH College of Medicine, will work as a collaborating physician, while nursing faculty and students will initially staff the clinic, a press release notes.

Treatments include aid for minor injuries and illnesses such as colds and flu, as well as other services including immunizations and screenings. Telehealth will be available for more serious referrals.

Hours of operation are 8:30 am to 1:30 pm; the school hopes to have the clinic opened two days a week in the spring.

Funding for the operation comes courtesy of the Humana Integrated Health System Sciences Institute, the Texas Methodist Foundation, and private donations, per a release.

Aside from an optimal training experience for practitioners in the making, the clinic promises aid to those who have none.

"The best way to provide the homeless with health care is to take it to them," said Shainy Varghese, associate professor of nursing, nurse practitioner, and clinic director, in a statement. "The clinic will draw patients from the Emergency Aid Coalition, an interfaith organization committed to helping those in need, which is housed at St. Paul's church."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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