houston voices

Houston expert: How to make the most out of your virtual meeting

With virtual meetings on the rise in the age of coronavirus, there are plenty of things you can do to ensure your meetings go without a hitch. Miguel Tovar/University of Houston

Even in the pre-pandemic world, more employees were working remotely in America than ever before. Participating in virtual meetings is the norm, at least for now. The shift came rather abruptly. Millions of Americans had only a few days to make the transition. People are now working on laptops where before they worked on double-screen desktops. Home computers proved to be less convenient to work on since work computers have files and sites already organized for easy access. There are certain things that are more effectively communicated in person than through a screen.

But in 2020, there are myriad conferencing platforms that make it easier than ever to communicate virtually. From Skype and Zoom to Teams and Slack, there is no doubt that virtual work is more convenient than ever. Here are a few tips for how you can develop a personal and professional brand through virtual meetings.

Cast from a carpeted room

When you cast yourself from an empty room with tile or wood flooring, you might notice an echo in your audio. It can sound like you're in a cathedral. Carpeted rooms create much better audio quality. If you're not interested in having your whole room redone, lay down a nice carpet on your floor. This will significantly reduce the reverberation and create a sound that is full and intimate.

Opt for a neutral background

Instinctually, one might think that a shelf full of books, plants and photos might present a professional background. They'd be correct. However, in the interest of a virtual meeting, less is more. A neutral-colored wall such as gray or white would accentuate focus on you. It would keep the viewers' eyes from wandering. Trying to figure out what books you read, who that is in your photos, or judging you from your organizational method (or lack thereof).

Consider your lighting

A dimly lit room can convey a sense of, well, creepiness. Don't be creepy. You want to exude positivity. The best way to achieve this is through nice lighting. You want to make sure your desk has enough lighting on your face to bring out the clarity of it on screen. "I suggest using two LED lights at your desk with adjustable lighting on each side your computer camera. They should face toward you so you can adjust for daylight. Even a single lamp would help."

Use your computer over your phone

I know, this sounds like it should go without saying. But it needs to be said. There are too many people doing conference calls via phone. Your phone should be your absolute last resort in a situation where your computer is down and a meeting is absolutely urgent. Using a computer allows you to take notes and provides for a more stable picture. The audio and video quality is also leagues better on a computer.

Take a tech test

Sure, you can't completely get away with not having any technical issues. But what you can do is minimize the issues you're likely to have. Test your web conferencing program well before you are slated to log on. Be sure to grant all the appropriate permissions prior to logging on for the first time. This will save you tons of time as you continually log on every time afterward. Make sure the camera is set up correctly and that the audio works. If your microphone isn't hooked up to the program, connect it. The more testing you do with your web conferencing tech the less issues you'll have when it's finally time to virtually meet.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea.

Rene Cantu, the author of this piece, is the writer and editor at UH Division of Research.

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Building Houston

 
 

Electric vans will now be delivering to Houston. Photo courtesy of Amazon

Amazon CEO/occasional space traveler Jeff Bezos is doing his best to supplant a certain jolly fellow from the North Pole as tops for holiday gift delivery.

His latest move: Amazon is rolling out more than 1,000 electric delivery vehicles, designed by electric vehicle manufacturer Rivian, ready to make deliveries in more than 100 cities across the U.S. On the Texas good list: Houston, Austin, and Dallas. Bezos' juggernaut began deliveries in Dallas in July, along with Baltimore, Chicago, Kansas City, Nashville, Phoenix, San Diego, Seattle, and St. Louis.

These zero-emissions vans have delivered more than 5 million packages to customers in the U.S., according to Amazon. The latest boost in vehicles now includes Houston and Austin; Boston; Denver; Indianapolis; Las Vegas; Madison, Wisconsin; Newark, New Jersey; New York, Oakland, California; Pittsburgh, Portland, Oregon; Provo, Utah; and Salt Lake City.

Plans for the Amazon and Rivian partnership call for thousands of vehicles on the road by the end of the year and 100,000 vehicles by 2030.

“We’re always excited for the holiday season, but making deliveries to customers across the country with our new zero-emission vehicles for the first time makes this year unique,” said Udit Madan, vice president of Amazon Transportation, in a statement. “We’ve already delivered over 5 million packages with our vehicles produced by Rivian, and this is still just the beginning—that figure will grow exponentially as we continue to make progress toward our 100,000-vehicle goal.”

This all comes as part of Amazon's commitment to reaching net-zero carbon by 2040, as a part of its The Climate Pledge; Amazon promises to eliminate millions of metric tons of carbon per year with it s commitment to 100,000 electric delivery vehicles by 2030, press materials note.

Additionally, Amazon announced plans to invest more than $1 billion over the next five years to further electrify and decarbonize its transportation network across Europe. This investment is meant to spark innovation and encourage more public charging infrastructure across the continent.

“Fleet electrification is essential to reaching the world’s zero-emissions goal,” said Jiten Behl, chief growth officer at Rivian, in a statement. “So, to see our ramp up in production supporting Amazon’s rollout in cities across the country is amazing. Not just for the environment, but also for our teams working hard to get tens of thousands of electric delivery vehicles on the road. They continue to be motivated by our combined mission and the great feedback about the vehicle’s performance and quality.”

A little about the vans: Drivers’ favorite features include a spacious cabin and cargo area, superior visibility with a large windshield and 360-degree cameras, and ventilated seats for fast heating and cooling — a must for Bayou City summers ... or winters, for that matter.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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