houston voices

Houston expert: How to make the most out of your virtual meeting

With virtual meetings on the rise in the age of coronavirus, there are plenty of things you can do to ensure your meetings go without a hitch. Miguel Tovar/University of Houston

Even in the pre-pandemic world, more employees were working remotely in America than ever before. Participating in virtual meetings is the norm, at least for now. The shift came rather abruptly. Millions of Americans had only a few days to make the transition. People are now working on laptops where before they worked on double-screen desktops. Home computers proved to be less convenient to work on since work computers have files and sites already organized for easy access. There are certain things that are more effectively communicated in person than through a screen.

But in 2020, there are myriad conferencing platforms that make it easier than ever to communicate virtually. From Skype and Zoom to Teams and Slack, there is no doubt that virtual work is more convenient than ever. Here are a few tips for how you can develop a personal and professional brand through virtual meetings.

Cast from a carpeted room

When you cast yourself from an empty room with tile or wood flooring, you might notice an echo in your audio. It can sound like you're in a cathedral. Carpeted rooms create much better audio quality. If you're not interested in having your whole room redone, lay down a nice carpet on your floor. This will significantly reduce the reverberation and create a sound that is full and intimate.

Opt for a neutral background

Instinctually, one might think that a shelf full of books, plants and photos might present a professional background. They'd be correct. However, in the interest of a virtual meeting, less is more. A neutral-colored wall such as gray or white would accentuate focus on you. It would keep the viewers' eyes from wandering. Trying to figure out what books you read, who that is in your photos, or judging you from your organizational method (or lack thereof).

Consider your lighting

A dimly lit room can convey a sense of, well, creepiness. Don't be creepy. You want to exude positivity. The best way to achieve this is through nice lighting. You want to make sure your desk has enough lighting on your face to bring out the clarity of it on screen. "I suggest using two LED lights at your desk with adjustable lighting on each side your computer camera. They should face toward you so you can adjust for daylight. Even a single lamp would help."

Use your computer over your phone

I know, this sounds like it should go without saying. But it needs to be said. There are too many people doing conference calls via phone. Your phone should be your absolute last resort in a situation where your computer is down and a meeting is absolutely urgent. Using a computer allows you to take notes and provides for a more stable picture. The audio and video quality is also leagues better on a computer.

Take a tech test

Sure, you can't completely get away with not having any technical issues. But what you can do is minimize the issues you're likely to have. Test your web conferencing program well before you are slated to log on. Be sure to grant all the appropriate permissions prior to logging on for the first time. This will save you tons of time as you continually log on every time afterward. Make sure the camera is set up correctly and that the audio works. If your microphone isn't hooked up to the program, connect it. The more testing you do with your web conferencing tech the less issues you'll have when it's finally time to virtually meet.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea.

Rene Cantu, the author of this piece, is the writer and editor at UH Division of Research.

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Building Houston

 
 

Calling all sports tech companies. A Galleria-area sports tech hub is opening this summer. Photo via braunenterprises.com

It's game time for a Houston-based coworking company that's working on opening a sports innovation hub this summer.

The Cannon is working on opening new hub in 53 West, a Galleria-area office building recently renovated by Braun Enterprises. The project is in partnership with Gow Media, InnovationMap's parent company, and will be co-located with the media business that runs Gow Broadcasting LLC and the SportsMap Radio Network, which includes local sports station 97.5 as well as national syndicated content.

The Cannon's founder Lawson Gow tells InnovationMap that Gow Media — founded by Lawson's father, David Gow — and Braun Enterprises were opportunistic partners for the organization.

"We've always been optimistically looking for strategic partners that we can co-locate with or team up with to create a hyper focused, niche community," Lawson Gow says. "We've spent a lot of time thinking about what that can be."

Expected to open midsummer, the new two-story space will have 23 offices and a 1,500-square-foot open space that can be used for events. All existing Cannon members will have access to the space, and potential tenants can expect a similar pricing model to The Cannon's other three Houston-area locations.

Houston makes sense for sports tech, which Gow defines as encompassing four categories of innovation — fan engagement, activity and performance, fantasy and gambling, and esports. Houston has the money, the big four sports teams, a big fan base, and corporate interest, he explains.

"Sports tech is a thing we can win at. There's no global hub for sports tech — so Houston can do that," Gow says. "We've always had that in our heads as a direction we want the city to head down, so it just makes it so opportunistic to create a space for that kind of innovation at work for the city."

53 West has been undergoing renovations recently. Photo via braunenterprises.com

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