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University of Houston: How much does it cost to start a startup?

Is it a New Year's resolution to start your company? Here's what sort of dollar signs to factor in. Graphic byMiguel Tovar/University of Houston

The process of opening a small business is already stressful enough without even worrying about how to fund it. But it’s good to start thinking about business costs early in order to know where the money will go.

Sammi Caramela, a Business News Daily contributing writer, said in an article to “be realistic” when considering how much starting a business is going to cost. She mentions that things like office space, legal fees, payroll, business credit cards and other organizational expenses are all things that need to be taken into account before even starting.

Caramela offers five things that prospective business owners should do if they don’t know where to start when it comes to funding their company.

Keep a healthy skepticism

Caramela advises to not invest too much money too quickly. You should have a good level of skepticism to balance the optimism you have going into the process. The best thing to do is to is to “start small” and workshop your idea or product on a very small budget.

“If the test seems successful, then you can start planning your business based on what you learned,” Caramela said.

Don't underestimate expenses

Caramela goes on to note that “according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, most microbusinesses cost around $3,000 to start, while most home-based franchises cost $2,000 to $5,000.”

Obviously, every new business is different and will require different expenses. It’s estimated that a prospective entrepreneur will need about six months’ worth of their starting expenses once they open.

“When planning your costs, don’t underestimate the expenses, and remember that they can rise as the business grows…It’s easy to overlook costs when you’re thinking about the big picture, but you should be more precise when planning for your fixed expenses,” serial entrepreneur Drew Gerber told Caramela.

Don’t let your business fail just because you ran out of money. The excitement of starting a company can cause you to overestimate your revenue and underestimate costs.

Distinguish types of business costs

Caramela offers several examples of the type of costs that perspective business owners should consider.

One-time vs. ongoing costs

One-time costs are those that will only need to be paid once. These mostly occur at the beginning of the process. These expenses included things like incorporating a company and equipment purchases.

Ongoing costs are paid regularly, like utilities.

Essential vs. optional costs

“Essential costs are expenses that are absolutely necessary for the company’s growth and development. Optional purchases should be made only if the budget allows,” Caramela said.

Fixed vs. variable costs

Rent would be an example of a fixed expense because it stays the same from month to month. Variable expanses, however, “depend on the direct sale of products or services.” Expect fixed costs to consume most of the company’s revenue in the beginning. If the company grows and is successful, these fixed costs won’t make or break you.

The Most Common Expenses

Caramela composed a list of expenses new business owners will most likely experience.

  • Web hosting and other website costs
  • Rental space for an office
  • Office furniture
  • Labor
  • Basic supplies
  • Basic technology
  • Insurance, license or permit fees
  • Advertising or promotions
  • Business plan costs

She also provides examples and estimated costs.

ItemEstimated Cost
Rent$2,750
Website$2,000
Payroll$175,000
Advertising/Promo$5,000
Basic Office Supplies$80
Total (Annual)$184,830

Want more information? Here are 14 types of business startup costs to consider when launching your company from NerdWallet.

Estimate revenue

“Bill Brigham, director of the New York Small Business Development Center in Albany, advises new business owners to project their cash flows for at least the first three months of the business’s life. He said to add up not only fixed costs but also the estimated costs of goods and best- and worst-case revenues,” Caramela said.

If possible, it’s best to not borrow at all when starting a new business. “Borrowing puts a lot of pressure on any business” and it doesn’t allow for very much wiggle room in the finances.

Factor in funding

If you’re going to borrow, here are a few things you can do. “Personal savings, loans from family and friends, government and bank loans and government grants” are all sources of funding that potential business owners can utilize. Camarela said that most companies use a combination of several of these methods for funding.

Though self-funding is the best option, there’s also options like business credit cards and angel investors.

Caramela suggests to check out SCORE for trainings and workshops targeted toward small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs. They also offer some counseling.

What's the big idea?

Starting a business is stressful in any case but now that you know how much money it’s actually going to take, don’t let lack of money stop you from making that next step and starting your business. Remember, skepticism is good but only if it’s a healthy amount. Now you know it’s an expensive process and the different types of funding you will need, but even if you aren’t able to fund it yourself, there are other options out there for you as long as your company is financially able to handle the commitment of borrowing.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea. Cory Thaxton, the author of this piece, is the communications coordinator for The Division of Research.

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Building Houston

 
 

Sieve Health is an AI cloud-based SaaS platform designed to automate and accelerate matching patients with clinical trials. Photo via Getty Images

On many occasions in her early career, Dr. Arti Bhosale, co-founder and CEO of Sieve Health, found herself frustrated with having to manually sift through thousands of digital files.

The documents, each containing the medical records of a patient seeking advanced treatment through a clinical trial, were always there to review — and there were always more to read.

Despite the tediousness of prescreening, which could take years, the idea of missing a patient and not giving them the opportunity to go through a potentially life-altering trial is what kept her going. The one she didn’t read could have slipped through the cracks and potentially not given someone care they needed.

“Those stories have stayed with me,” she says. “That’s why we developed Sieve.”

When standard health care is not an option, advances in medical treatment could be offered through clinical trials. But matching patients to those trials is one of the longest standing problems in the health care industry. Now with the use of new technology as of 2018, the solution to the bottleneck may be a new automated approach.

“Across the globe, more than 30 percent of clinical trials shut down as a result of not enrolling enough patients,” says Bhosale. “The remaining 80 percent never end up reaching their target enrollment and are shut down by the FDA.”

In 2020, Bhosale and her team developed Sieve Health, an AI cloud-based SaaS platform designed to automate and accelerate matching patients with clinical trials and increase access to clinical trials.

Sieve’s main goal is to reduce the administrative burden involved in matching enrollments, which in turn will accelerate the trial execution. They provide the matching for physicians, study sponsors and research sites to enhance operations for faster enrollment of the trials.

The technology mimics but automates the traditional enrollment process — reading medical notes and reviewing in the same way a human would.

“I would have loved to use something like this when I was on the front lines,” Bhosale says, who worked in clinical research for over 12 years. “Can you imagine going through 10,000 records manually? Some of the bigger hospitals have upwards of 100,000 records and you still have to manually review those charts to make sure that the patient is eligible for the trial. That process is called prescreening. It is painful.”

Because physicians wear many hats and have many clinical efforts on their plates, research tends to fall to the bottom of the to-do list. Finding 10-20 patients can take the research team on average 15-20 months to find those people — five of which end up unenrolling, she says.

“We have designed the platform so that the magic can happen in the background, and it allows the physician and research team to get a jumpstart,” she says.” They don’t have to worry about reviewing 10,000 records — they know what their efforts are going to be and will ensure that the entire database has been scanned.”

With Sieve, the team was able to help some commercial pilot programs have a curated data pool for their trials – cutting the administrative burden and time spent searching to less than a week.

Sieve is in early-stage start up mode and the commercial platform has been rolled out. Currently, the team is conducting commercial projects with different research sites and hospitals.

“Our focus now is seeing how many providers we can connect into this,” she says. “There’s a bigger pool out there who want to participate in research but don’t know where to start. That’s where Sieve is stepping in and enabling them to do this — partnering with those and other groups in the ecosystem to bring trials to wherever the physicians and the patients are.”

Arti Bhosale is the co-founder and CEO of Sieve Health. Photo courtesy of Sieve

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