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5 most popular innovation stories in Houston this week

From exciting local events — like the upcoming Digital Fight Club — to innovators to know, here's what news was popular on InnovationMap. Courtesy of Digital Fight Club

Editor's note: This week in Houston innovation news, readers saw headlines of exciting events upcoming — like the Accenture-backed Digital Fight Club coming next month — as well as recaps — like Ignite's annual Fire Pitch Competition that awarded thousands to female-led health tech companies. Plus, an out-of-state tech company opened its first Texas office in Houston. Here's what other news stories piqued InnovationMap's readers' interest.

3 Houston innovators to know this week

This week's innovators to know in Houston all have new and exciting things to announce. Courtesy photos

Who are Houston's innovators to know? Well this week, here's who made headlines, from a well-known Houston software entrepreneur and investor rolling out a new line of business for his company to a new podcast network with Houston roots. Continue reading.

Female founders win big at this Houston health tech pitch competition

Ria Health took home first place at the third annual Fire Pitch Competition. Courtesy of Ignite Healthcare

All it takes is a spark for something to ignite, and, at the third annual Fire Pitch Competition by the Ignite Healthcare Network, eight female founders set the stage on fire.

The Fire Pitch Competition first started in 2017 to shine a spotlight on female entrepreneurs in health care. With two successful events under her belt, Ayse McCracken says she knew she could do more to help these women with their business ideas.

"What we discovered is that it's not enough. Startups get to pitch all over, and they want to invest their time wisely," McCracken says. "And it's not enough for the rest of the ecosystem — the customers — and the investors want companies that actually are investable." Continue reading.

Accenture and InnovationMap team up to bring innovative high-energy event to Houston for the first time

Houston's first Digital Fight Club will be November 20 at White Oak Music Hall. Courtesy of Digital Fight Club

The Houston innovation ecosystem has seen its fair share of panels. Whether the discussion is focused on digital health care or investing, it's structured the same way. However, one organization has redesigned what a typical innovation networking and panel event needs to look like, and Houston gets to see the Digital Fight Club in action in November.

Michael Pratt came up with the idea for Digital Fight Club as a way to liven up technology-focused events and networking opportunities. They plan was to pit two specialists against one another, with a referee steering the conversation. The audience is involved too and can vote in real time for the winner of the, for lack of a better word, debate. Continue reading.

Digital supply chain tech company expands to Houston

Backed by an Austin venture group, Navegate has opened a Houston outpost. Courtesy of Navegate

A growing software company backed by Austin-based Next Coast Ventures has set its eyes on a new office in Houston.

Navegate, a digital supply chain technology and services for the middle market with headquarters in Minneapolis and offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Shanghai, announced its new offices in Houston and Kansas City as well as a the beta version of a new software platform. The company now has 100 employees across its six offices.

"At Navegate we have a concierge-level commitment to fulfilling our clients' needs," says Nathan Dey, CEO of Navegate, in a news release. "By establishing Kansas City and Houston offices, we're expanding our footprint to have physical locations in two critical freight hubs. These locations will provide further leverage for both existing and future Navegate clients in their efforts to build best-in-class supply chains." Continue reading.

Young professionals should focus on saving for retirement today, advises this Houston expert

It's National Retirement Security Week — and to celebrate, you need to start thinking about saving. Getty Images

National Retirement Security Week is upon us. In 2006, the United States Senate passed a resolution establishing the third week of October as a time to raise awareness about the importance of retirement savings and to encourage Americans to contribute to their retirement plans. The sponsors of the resolution hoped Americans would think about their retirement goals and assess their progress.

The Senate had good advice. Consider this: less than half of Americans have calculated how much money they will need to have in retirement. Additionally, the average person will spend a whopping 20 years in retirement. This data means you need to be proactive in your retirement planning, especially if you plan to retire early. Experts project that the average American will need 70 – 90 percent of their pre-retirement income to continue to live in their current standard of living. Even with well-funded savings, retirees will face challenges such as high costs of healthcare and the future of Medicare and Social Security. Continue reading.

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Karl Ecklund, left, and Paul Padley of Rice University have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy to continue physics research on the universe. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Two Rice University physicists and professors have received a federal grant to continue research on dark matter in the universe.

Paul Padley and Karl Ecklund, professors of physics and astronomy at Rice, have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy for their research to continue the university's ongoing research at the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, a particle accelerator consisting of a 17-mile ring of superconducting magnets buried beneath Switzerland and France.

"With this grant we will be able to continue our investigations into the nature of the matter that comprises the universe, what the dark matter that permeates the universe is, and if there is physics beyond what we already know," Padley says in a press release.

This grant is a part of the DOE's $132 million in funding for high-energy physics research. The LHC has received a total of $4.5 million to date to continue this research. Most recently, Ecklund and Padley received a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to go toward updates to the LHC.

"High-energy physics research improves our understanding of the universe and is an essential element for maintaining America's leadership in science," says Paul Dabbar, undersecretary for science at the DOE, in the release. "These projects at 53 different institutions across our nation will advance efforts both in theory and through experiments that explore the subatomic world and study the cosmos. They will also support American scientists serving key roles in important international collaborations at institutions across our nation."

In 2012, Padley and his team discovered the Higgs boson, a feat that was extremely key to the continuance of exploring the Standard Model of particle physics. Since then, the physicists have been working hard to answer the many questions involved in studying physics and the universe.

"Over many decades, the particle physics group at Rice has been making fundamental contributions to our understanding of the basic building blocks of the universe," Padley says in the release. "With this grant we will be able to continue this long tradition of important work."

Paul Padley and his team as made important dark matter findings at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. Photo via rice.ed

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