Houston Prime members have a new option for skipping mall parking and lines. Photo via Amazon

Amazon has tapped more than 10 markets to roll out its new retail delivery service — and Houston makes the list.

Prime members can browse a handful of retail stores online on Amazon or through the app if they reside in one of the selected ZIP codes in Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Miami, Phoenix, Scottsdale, Seattle, Washington D.C., and more. The initial roll out of the service includes brands PacSun, GNC, SuperDry, and Diesel, but, according to Amazon, Sur La Table and 100% Pure will also be added into the mix over the next few months.

“We see high potential in our expanded seller partnership with Amazon, which includes delivery directly from select PacSun retail locations,” says Mimi Ruiz, vice president of ecommerce at PacSun, in a news release. “This is one more way for us to offer our customers the styles they want and love, when they want them.”

Users can check online to see if the service is available in their area. Some stores offer pickup too, but delivery is $2.99 or free for Prime members as long as they meet the $25 order minimum.

“The expansion of Amazon’s Same-Day Delivery to include beloved brands delivered directly from nearby retail locations is just another way we are offering customers even greater selection, at faster speeds,” says Sarah Mathew, director of Amazon Delivery Experience, in the release. “We are excited to see this new model come to life and look forward to adding more brands, stores, and locations to the program.”

The delivery service is free to Prime members who spend $25 or more. Photo via Amazon

Amazon Prime Air drones will fly into College Station later this year. Photo courtesy of Amazon

Amazon plans to land drone delivery down the road from Houston

prime spot

A Houston neighbor will be among the first in the nation to test pilot a game-changing delivery system. Amazon has announced plans to deploy its state-of-the art Prime Air drone delivery in College Station, Texas later this year.

The online juggernaut is already reaching out to College Station customers, telling them that they’ll soon receive free and fast drone delivery on thousands of everyday items. The deployment marks the largest selection of items to ever be available for drone delivery, per Amazon. College Station joins Lockeford, California as targeted test sites for drone launch.

“We are impressed with so many aspects of College Station,” notes an Amazon blog post announcing the news. “The innovative research conducted by Texas A&M University, the small-town feel, and the sense of community that is clear from the minute you arrive in town all make it a very special place.”

Jeff Bezos’ empire plans to also collaborate with the Aggies on tech. “We are thrilled about the opportunity to launch this service in College Station and partner with the city and its world-class university on some of the great work they’ve been doing in the area drone technology,” the post adds.

How will it work? Once onboarded, College Station customers can then view Prime Air-eligible items on Amazon, where they can place orders and receive an estimated arrival time with a status tracker for their order.

Amazon Prime Air’s New Delivery Drone www.youtube.com

Drones will then fly to the designated delivery location, descend to the customer’s backyard, and hover at a safe height. The drones will then safely release the package, rise back up to altitude, and return to base, per Amazon.

Amazon is touting the difference of its drone fleet versus the masses. Prime Air drones fly up to 50 miles per hour, up to an altitude of 400 feet, and carry packages of up to 5 pounds.

Unlike most drones, Amazon notes, Prime Air drones utilize a sophisticated, sense-and-avoid system allowing them to operate at greater distances while safely and reliably avoiding other aircraft, people, pets, and obstacles. That means the drones can identify objects such as aircraft, birds, or static places such as trees and chimneys, avoid them, and select a safe space to land and later, safely leave.

“Being one of the first drone delivery locations for Amazon puts College Station at the forefront of this exciting technology,” said John Sharp, chancellor of The Texas A&M University System, in a statement. “What happens here will help advance drone delivery for the rest of the country and perhaps the rest of the world. We welcome Amazon to our community and stand ready to assist however we can.”

College Station, Amazon promises, will benefit by more than just speedy, environmentally friendly delivery. “We’re bringing more than drone delivery to Lockeford and College Station,” notes the Amazon blog. “Through these Prime Air drone deliveries, we will create new jobs, build partnerships with local organizations, and help to reduce the impact of climate change on future generations.”

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

The Houston Food Bank scored marks for its innovative use of tech and the cloud. Photo courtesy of Houston Food Bank

Houston food charity scores prestigious Amazon tech grant

high tech gift

One of Houston’s most cherished food charities has been recognized for its tech prowess. Houston Food Bank has been awarded the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Imagine Grant.

The endowment honors “the vision and work of nonprofit organizations as they seek to improve their communities and the world with the help of cloud technology,” per a press release.

Specifically, the food bank was recognized in the Go Further, Faster category for the launching of a cloud-native digital logistics platform to better serve vulnerable populations facing food insecurity (that insecurity was greatly exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the food bank notes.

Each winner in this category receives up to $150,000 in unrestricted funding, up to $100,000 in AWS Promotional Credit, and essential engagement with AWS technical specialists.

The challenges of COVID and the pandemic forced the food bank to get creative — and it responded. The food bank began delivering meals in March 2020 as part of its COVID-19 response through partnerships with volunteers, staff, corporate donors, and organizations such as CrowdSource Rescue, Task Rabbit, and Amazon.

This pilot has been a success: to date, more than 2.3 million meals have been delivered to those in need, the food bank notes in press materials.

Tech-wise, the food bank’s Home Delivery Platform operates using a cloud-native serverless architecture which includes heavy use of AWS services (AWS Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon API Gateway, AWS Amplify, and more), with a mobile web responsive front-end written in React/Typescript.

The client side is split across four responsive web applications, each with a different function: Home Delivery management, pantry management, client orders, and driver deliveries. All of these apps utilize shared components and APIs that communicate with each other based on the different user personas.

Pariveda Solutions serves as the technology partner for the implementation of this platform. The project is a capability expansion on top of an existing manual process to deliver food to clients.

Houston Food Bank applied for the Imagine Grant in order to enhance their process digitally, connect submitted orders to the client’s nearest pantry, and manage delivery operations more effectively, with an emphasis on time management and delivery logistics, the organization notes in a release.

“With the success of our home delivery operations, Houston Food Bank’s goal now is to scale operations to expand home delivery for greater reach and impact,” said HFB president/CEO Brian Greene in a statement. “Additionally, with the proposed improvements, we hope to shift to utilizing volunteers for this important service instead of third-party delivery providers, and to deliver food using the client choice model, where clients may select foods based on personal preference, cultural and dietary needs. We are thankful to AWS and Pariveda Solutions for providing their support and expertise as we continue to find new ways to solve the age-old problem of hunger and work towards our ultimate vision of a world that no longer needs food banks.”

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

A new Amazon delivery station is headed to League City. Photo courtesy of Amazon

Amazon yet again expands its presence in Houston

it's 'zon

Jeff Bezos' global powerhouse is showing no signs of slowing; indeed, its Houston-area footprint is growing. Amazon Logistics has announced plans to open a new 180,000-square-foot delivery station located in League City.

This new outpost promises to power Amazon's last-mile delivery capabilities to speed up deliveries for customers specifically in the Galveston County area, per a release.

Just what is an Amazon delivery station? Simply put, packages are shipped to delivery stations from neighboring Amazon fulfillment and sortation centers and loaded onto vehicles for final delivery to customers.

Amazon brass projects the site located at 2455 Tuscan Lakes Blvd. to open in early 2022. Along with obvious delivery improvement for area residents, the new center will offer plenty of local job opportunities. Candidates can earn an industry-leading minimum starting wage of $15 per hour; full-time employees receive comprehensive benefits, including full medical, vision, and dental insurance as well as a 401(k) with an impressive 50-percent company match.

(Those interested should visit https://www.amazondelivers.jobs/ for information on job postings and to apply online.)

Delivery stations also offer entrepreneurs the opportunity to build their own business delivering Amazon packages, as well as independent contractors the flexibility to be their own boss and create their own schedule delivering for Amazon Flex, the company notes.

As CultureMap previously reported, Amazon opened four Houston-area delivery stations in March.

"We are extremely excited about Amazon coming to League City," said League City mayor Pat Hallisey in a statement. "Not only will it bring jobs, but it will benefit a large majority of our residents, as well as those in neighboring cities, who regularly shop on Amazon."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Amazon is delivering four new stations to Houston. Photo courtesy of Amazon

Amazon ramps up delivery service in Houston with 4 new outposts

now delivering

Houstonians who anxiously watch their Amazon order status when it's "out for delivery" can take heart that the process may now be speedier.

Jeff Bezos' global juggernaut of all things shopping has just announced four new delivery stations in Houston, aimed specifically at increasing efficiency for deliveries.

How do these delivery stations work? Packages from Amazon's fulfillment and sortation centers are shipped to delivery stations, where they are loaded into vehicles for final delivery.

Amazon expects the new sites to open later this year, per a press release. The new delivery station locations are

  • 9155 Derrington Rd. (76011)
  • 11311 N Gessner Dr. (77064)
  • Northcrest and Spring Steubner in Spring (77064)
  • Interstate 59 and Kingwood Dr. (77365)

These new sites also offer employment opportunities, creating more than 300 new, full-time jobs. The gigs pay a $15 per hour starting wage and offer a variety of benefits packages.

Delivery stations also offer entrepreneurs the opportunity to build their own business delivering Amazon packages, as well as independent contractors the flexibility to be their own boss and create their own schedule delivering for Amazon Flex, the company notes.

"We are excited to continue our investment in Texas with new delivery stations across Houston that will create hundreds of new job opportunities and provide faster and more efficient delivery for customers," said Amazon spokesperson Daniel Martin in a statement. "We look forward to continuing our growth in Texas and want to thank local and state leaders for their support in making these projects possible."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Amazon has announced where its latest Houston-area fulfillment center is going to be. Photo by Natalie Harms/InnovationMap

Amazon announces another fulfillment center in the Houston area

it's 'zon

Amazon.com Inc. has expanded its presence in the greater Houston area with the announcement of its latest fulfillment center in Missouri City,. Expected to open in 2021, the new one million square-foot center will create over 500 new full-time jobs.

"We're excited to be expanding our network of operations in Missouri City," says Alicia Boler Davis, Amazon's vice president of global customer fulfillment, in a press release. "We are grateful for the strong support we've received from local and state leaders as we broaden our footprint throughout Texas. Every day at Amazon, incredible employees come together to deliver magical experiences for customers and we look forward to creating over 500 jobs for the local community, with industry-leading pay and comprehensive benefits starting on day one."

While Amazon has opened a few fulfillment centers over the past several years — including some equipped in automation and robotics — the new location will focus on bulky or larger-sized customer items such as patio furniture, outdoor equipment, or rugs, according to the release.

According to Missouri City Mayor Yolanda Ford, this deal represents the city council's priority of expanding the economic base and "moving Missouri City's economy forward into the future."

"Missouri City and Amazon are alike when it comes to success, diversity, customer service and community. We are looking forward to this new business model, which focuses on customer service and expands the economy as this is another partnership that will build on our commercial tax base, helping to ease the property tax burden on residents," says Mayor Ford in the release.

Per the release, Amazon has created more than 43,000 jobs in Texas since 2010 with an estimated economic impact of more than $18.8 billion to the state.

According to city leadership, this is just the first step in what they hope is a long relationship between Missouri City and Amazon.

"We welcome Amazon to Missouri City and are excited that this piece of the City's long-term economic development plan has come to fruition," says City Manager Odis Jones in the release. "Our teams have been working hand-in-hand the last few weeks to finalize the deal and we are looking forward to continuing our corporate-community partnership with this industry giant for years to come."

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Houston-based health tech startup is revolutionizing patient selection for clinical trials

working smarter

On many occasions in her early career, Dr. Arti Bhosale, co-founder and CEO of Sieve Health, found herself frustrated with having to manually sift through thousands of digital files.

The documents, each containing the medical records of a patient seeking advanced treatment through a clinical trial, were always there to review — and there were always more to read.

Despite the tediousness of prescreening, which could take years, the idea of missing a patient and not giving them the opportunity to go through a potentially life-altering trial is what kept her going. The one she didn’t read could have slipped through the cracks and potentially not given someone care they needed.

“Those stories have stayed with me,” she says. “That’s why we developed Sieve.”

When standard health care is not an option, advances in medical treatment could be offered through clinical trials. But matching patients to those trials is one of the longest standing problems in the health care industry. Now with the use of new technology as of 2018, the solution to the bottleneck may be a new automated approach.

“Across the globe, more than 30 percent of clinical trials shut down as a result of not enrolling enough patients,” says Bhosale. “The remaining 80 percent never end up reaching their target enrollment and are shut down by the FDA.”

In 2020, Bhosale and her team developed Sieve Health, an AI cloud-based SaaS platform designed to automate and accelerate matching patients with clinical trials and increase access to clinical trials.

Sieve’s main goal is to reduce the administrative burden involved in matching enrollments, which in turn will accelerate the trial execution. They provide the matching for physicians, study sponsors and research sites to enhance operations for faster enrollment of the trials.

The technology mimics but automates the traditional enrollment process — reading medical notes and reviewing in the same way a human would.

“I would have loved to use something like this when I was on the front lines,” Bhosale says, who worked in clinical research for over 12 years. “Can you imagine going through 10,000 records manually? Some of the bigger hospitals have upwards of 100,000 records and you still have to manually review those charts to make sure that the patient is eligible for the trial. That process is called prescreening. It is painful.”

Because physicians wear many hats and have many clinical efforts on their plates, research tends to fall to the bottom of the to-do list. Finding 10-20 patients can take the research team on average 15-20 months to find those people — five of which end up unenrolling, she says.

“We have designed the platform so that the magic can happen in the background, and it allows the physician and research team to get a jumpstart,” she says.” They don’t have to worry about reviewing 10,000 records — they know what their efforts are going to be and will ensure that the entire database has been scanned.”

With Sieve, the team was able to help some commercial pilot programs have a curated data pool for their trials – cutting the administrative burden and time spent searching to less than a week.

Sieve is in early-stage start up mode and the commercial platform has been rolled out. Currently, the team is conducting commercial projects with different research sites and hospitals.

“Our focus now is seeing how many providers we can connect into this,” she says. “There’s a bigger pool out there who want to participate in research but don’t know where to start. That’s where Sieve is stepping in and enabling them to do this — partnering with those and other groups in the ecosystem to bring trials to wherever the physicians and the patients are.”

Arti Bhosale is the co-founder and CEO of Sieve Health. Photo courtesy of Sieve

Houston nonprofit unveils new and improved bayou cleaning vessel

litter free

For over 20 years, a nonprofit organization has hired people to clean 14 miles of bayou in Houston. And with a newly updated innovative boat, keeping Buffalo Bayou clean just got a lot more efficient.

Buffalo Bayou Partnership unveils its newest version of the Bayou-Vac this week, and it's expected to be fully operational this month. BBP Board Member Mike Garver designed both the initial model of the custom-designed and fabricated boat as well as the 2022 version. BBP's Clean & Green team — using Garver's boat — has removed around 2,000 cubic yards of trash annually, which is the equivalent of about 167 commercial dump trucks. The new and improved version is expected to make an even bigger impact.

“The Bayou-Vac is a game changer for our program,” says BBP field operations manager, Robby Robinson, in a news release. “Once up and running, we foresee being able to gain an entire workday worth of time for every offload, making us twice as efficient at clearing trash from the bayou.”

Keeping the bayou clean is important, since the water — and whatever trash its carrying — runs off into Galveston Bay, and ultimately, the Gulf of Mexico. The improvements made to the Bayou-Vac include removable dumpsters that can be easily swapped out, slid off, and attached to a dump truck. The older model included workers having to manually handle trash and debris and a secondary, land-based vacuum used to suck out the trash from onboard.

Additionally, the Bayou-Vac now has a moveable, hydraulic arm attached to the bow of the vessel that can support the weight of the 16-foot vacuum hose. Again, this task was something done manually on the previous model of the Bayou-Vac.

“BBP deeply appreciates the ingenuity of our board member Mike Garver and the generosity of Sis and Hasty Johnson and the Kinder Foundation, the funders of the new Bayou-Vac,” BBP President Anne Olson says in the release. “We also thank the Harris County Flood Control District and Port Houston for their longtime support of BBP’s Clean & Green Program.”