Starting smart

Station Houston unveils its Ion Smart Cities Accelerator program and prototyping lab

The Ion Smart Cities Accelerator's space is open for business. Carter Smith/Station Houston

With the inaugural cohort selected and the new office space's ribbon cut, Station Houston's Ion Smart Cities Accelerator has officially launched.

The program, which is backed by Intel and Microsoft with support from Station, the city of Houston, and TX/RX, announced the 10 startups selected for the 10-month program in late August. The program commenced September 4, but on September 23, the program officially opened its new space in Station.

"The purpose of the Ion Smart Cities Accelerator is to address the needs of the Houston community by developing and deploying technology to enhance the civic fabric that makes Houston so innovative," says Christine Galib, director of the Ion Smart Cities Accelerator, in a news release. "It was imperative to create a space that represents the intersections of collaboration, innovation, and technology and makes these intersections accessible."

The new space has key features important for the startups to develop their ideas. A prototyping lab and makerspace will be available for the entrepreneurs and will even have engineering experts available for supervision, programming, and other support for the startups. The cohort can also utilize the XR Lab, which comes equipped with virtual reality technology.

While going through the program, each of the participating companies will work in "design-thought" flex space and be able to access programming focused on tech, data, design, and business provided by General Assembly, a leader in educational programming.

The accelerator's Demo Day is scheduled for December 4, and then the participants will complete a pilot program with the city from January to June, Galib says. Based on the issues the cohort aims to solve — resilience and mobility — the program and the city of Houston decided on Near Northside as a focus for the companies.

Show and tell

Carter Smith/Station Houston

ION Accelerator ribbon cutting event, with Mayor Sylvester Turner and business partners.

The new makerspace and prototyping lab comes equipped with state-of-the-art technologies.

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Building Houston

 
 

Tvardi Therapeutics Inc. has fresh funds to support its drug's advancement in clinical trials. Photo via Getty Images

A Houston-based clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company has raised millions in its latest round.

Tvardi Therapeutics Inc. closed its $74 million series B funding round led by new investors New York-based Slate Path Capital, Florida-based Palkon Capital, Denver-based ArrowMark Partners, and New York-based 683 Capital, with continued support and participation by existing investors, including Houston-based Sporos Bioventures.

"We are thrilled to move out of stealth mode and partner with this lineup of long-term institutional investors," says Imran Alibhai, CEO at Tvardi. "With this financing we are positioned to advance the clinical development of our small molecule inhibitors of STAT3 into mid-stage trials as well as grow our team."

Through Slate Path Capital's investment, Jamie McNab, partner at the firm, will join Tvardi's board of directors.

"Tvardi is the leader in the field of STAT3 biology and has compelling proof of concept clinical data," McNab says in the release. "I look forward to partnering with the management team to advance Tvardi's mission to develop a new class of breakthrough medicines for cancer, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis."

Tvardi's latest fundraise will go toward supporting the company's products in their mid-stage trials for cancer and fibrosis. According to the release, Tvardi's lead product, TTI-101, is being studied in a Phase 1 trial of patients with advanced solid tumors who have failed all lines of therapy. So far, the drug has been well-received and shown multiple durable radiographic objective responses in the cancer patients treated.

Dr. Keith Flaherty, who is a member of Tvardi's scientific advisory board and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, offered his support of the company.

"STAT3 is a compelling and validated target. Beyond its clinical activity, Tvardi's lead molecule, TTI-101, has demonstrated direct downregulation of STAT3 in patients," he says in the release. "As a physician, I am eager to see the potential of Tvardi's molecules in diseases of high unmet medical need where STAT3 is a key driver."

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