stacking up

Houston rise in the ranks of the top emerging ecosystems in the world

According to a new report, Houston is among the top emerging ecosystems. Photo by Zview/Getty Images

If you need evidence that Houston's startup ecosystem is flourishing, look no further than a new report from Startup Genome and the Global Entrepreneurship Network.

This year's Global Startup Ecosystem Report, released September 22, places Houston at No. 19 among the world's top 100 emerging startup ecosystems. Furthermore, it puts Houston at No. 4 among the top regional challengers in North America. Last year's report lumped Houston with other emerging startup ecosystems in the 31-to-40 ranking range.

Mumbai, India, appears at No. 1 among the world's top 100 emerging startup ecosystems this year, while Miami lands at No. 1 among the top regional challengers in North America.

According to Houston Exponential, the city's startup ecosystem "is experiencing a growth spurt that appears to show no signs of abating."

Case in point: Houston startups raised more than $1 billion in the first six months of 2021, surpassing all annual totals from previous years. In 2020, Houston startups reaped a record-high $753 million in venture capital.

"Venture capital invested in Houston startups has nearly quadrupled since 2016," according to a recent Houston Exponential report. "The sustained level of progress we've seen in startup formation and growth over the past four years shows that Houston has what it takes to build a vibrant, healthy innovation economy with an emphasis on equity."

Collectively, the health care and information technology sectors accounted for nearly 60 percent of Houston's VC deals in the first half of 2021, the report says.

Another sign of the expansion of Houston's startup ecosystem: the rising number of workspaces, incubators, and accelerators designed to foster startups.

"These key institutions create density and drive collisions among founders, investors, and talent, significantly increasing the rate of startup formation and growth," according to the Greater Houston Partnership.

Those institutions include The Ion entrepreneurial hub, the Greentown Labs climate-tech incubator, and the DivInc startup accelerator. All are new arrivals on the Houston startup scene.

"DivInc is about broadening the startup ecosystem by making it more authentically diverse, equitable, and inclusive of underrepresented entrepreneurs," Preston James II, CEO of DivInc, said in April. "When we, as a community, do this successfully, we optimize our opportunities for economic GDP growth, we can help reduce racial/gender wealth divide, and drive greater innovation."

Elsewhere in Texas, Austin ranks 20th among the leading startup ecosystems in the Global Startup Ecosystem Report, down from No. 19 last year, and Dallas repeats its 31st-place tie. Silicon Valley tops the global list.

The report says North America represents half of the top 30 ecosystems in the world.

"Entrepreneurs, policymakers, and community leaders in North America have been working hard to build inclusive innovation ecosystems that are engines of economic growth and job creation for all," JF Gauthier, founder and CEO of Startup Genome, says in a news release.

San Francisco-based Startup Genome is a research and advisory firm specializing in startup ecosystems.

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Building Houston

 
 

According to a new report, Houston's workforce isn't among the happiest in the nation. Photo via Getty Images

Call it the Bayou City Blues. A report from job website Lensa ranks Houston third among the U.S. cities with the unhappiest workers.

The report looks at four factors — vacation days taken, hours worked per week, average pay, and overall happiness — to determine the happiest and unhappiest cities for U.S. workers.

Lensa examined data for 30 major cities, including Dallas and San Antonio. Dallas appears at the top of the list of the cities with the unhappiest workers, and San Antonio lands at No. 8.

Minneapolis ranks first among the cities with the happiest workers.

Here's how Houston fared in the four ranking categories:

  • 16.6 million unused vacation days per year.
  • 40.1 average hours worked per week.
  • Median annual pay of $32,251.
  • Happiness score of out of 50.83.

Dallas had 19.4 million unused vacation days per year, 40.5 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $34,479, and a happiness score of 53.3 out of 100.

Meanwhile, San Antonio had 5.7 million unused vacation days per year, 39.2 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $25,894, and a happiness score of 48.61.

Texas tops Lensa's list of the states with the unhappiest workers.

"While the Lone Star State had a decent happiness score of 52.56 out of 100, it scored poorly on each of the other factors, with Texans allowing an incredible 67.1 million earned vacation days go to waste over the course of a year," Lensa says.

In terms of general happiness, Houston shows up at No. 123 on WalletHub's most recent list of the happiest U.S. cities. Dallas takes the No. 104 spot, and San Antonio lands at No. 141. Fremont, California, grabs the No. 1 ranking.

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