low carbon funding

Rice University's Shell-backed hub announces latest research grants

Established in 2019, Rice University's Carbon Hub has named its first batch of research grant recipients. Photo via rice.edu

Several clean energy research teams have been awarded grants from a Rice University hub that focuses on innovating zero-emissions technology.

The Carbon Hub has awarded seven seed grants to research teams working on solutions for clean energy. The selections represent the first from the hub, which was established in 2019 following a $10 million gift from Shell. The hub's goal is to fundamentally change how the world uses hydrocarbons and to lead $100 million of science and engineering initiatives.

"Our starting point is utilizing methane and other light hydrocarbons to co-produce clean hydrogen and high-value materials that can outcompete and displace heavy CO2 emitters like metals, construction ceramics and fertilizers," says Carbon Hub Director Matteo Pasquali in a news release.

The selected proposals, according to the release, are as follows:

  • Cambridge's Adam Boies, Simone Hochgreb, James Elliot and Matthew Juniper will investigate the fundamental kinetics of catalytic reactions that produce carbon nanotubes from methane. The research aims to gather necessary information for the design and scaleup of reactors for high-yield production.
  • UC Berkeley's Roya Maboudian, Paulo Monteiro, Carlo Carraro and Jiaqi Li will use experimental and computational techniques to investigate cement reinforced with carbon fibers. The team will investigate a wide range of fibers and concrete binders to find optimal blends.
  • Rice's Caroline Masiello and Daniel Cohan will use bench-scale experiments and computer models to investigate whether methane-derived carbon could reduce urban smog and/or reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations if added to soil as it is in popular charcoal soil amendments called biochar.
  • IMDEA's Juan Vilatela will address engineering challenges for using non-woven carbon nanotube fabrics in place of lithium battery components made of aluminum and copper. Replacing those metal components could eliminate more than 4 million tons of annual atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions.
  • Rice's Geoffrey Wehmeyer, Junichiro Kono and Matthew Foster will lay the groundwork for replacing metal power transmission cables with carbon nanotube fibers. To allow side-by-side comparisons, they will investigate fundamental electrical and thermal conductivity at scales ranging from individual nanotubes to bundles of tubes, fibers of bundles and yarns of fibers.
  • Milan Polytechnic's Matteo Maestri and Matteo Pelucchi aim to pave the way for optimized co-production of hydrogen and carbon nanotubes by developing descriptive frameworks for competing catalytic reactions. The information would allow process engineers to minimize production of unwanted soot in large-scale reactors for nanotube production.
  • MIT's Mark Goulthorpe and UDRI's Paul Kladitis will test the performance of carbon nanotube materials in a variety of composites that could be used to construct homes and other buildings. The work complements Goulthorpe's CarbonHouse, a demonstration project supported by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy to validate the use of carbon from methane pyrolysis as both structural and non-structural building materials.

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Building Houston

 
 

Supporting and honoring our Hispanic-Latino clients is not just a month-long initiative, it is a long-term, generational investment in America and we are proud to be investing in a stronger economy for Houston now and for years to come. Photo via Getty Images

Every year at this time ― Hispanic Heritage Month ― we collectively celebrate the economic, cultural, and social contributions of the Hispanic-Latino community to our nation. We honor the work of past generations which have allowed children and future generations to benefit from more opportunities.

As diverse a community as is the world, we strive to build a future where there are no barriers for success, and at Bank of America, we do our part to make an impact by helping build Hispanic-Latino wealth in Houston.

The numbers are clear: The 2020 Census revealed that the Hispanic-Latino population in the United States rose to 62.1 million, making up 18.7 percent of the total U.S. population and accounting for slightly more than half (51.1 percent) of the population growth between 2010 and 2020. Hispanic-Latinos now open more small businesses than any other group in the country and are also the fastest-growing demographic of small business owners across the nation. It is not surprising that Hispanic-Latino economic power continues to rise year after year. According to Nielsen Scarborough, the number of Houston Hispanic businesses have increased 85 percent since 2013.

Investing in business

Investing in Hispanic-Latino wealth means supporting entrepreneurs so they are set up for success. Early-stage funding is critical for the growth of a new business, especially when Hispanic-Latino entrepreneurs are still faced with gaps in financial literacy and business education, funding, and networking opportunities.

According to data from Crunchbase, Latino-founded startups accounted for only 2.1 percent of venture investments in the U.S. last year. This is unjustifiable.

As part of our commitment to advancing racial equality and economic opportunity, we have dedicated $350 million in minority- and women-led companies through capital investment by mission-focused venture funds. Of the funds we have in our portfolio, one in every four are led by Hispanic-Latino managers, providing capital that will help entrepreneurs and small business owners grow their businesses, create jobs, and improve financial stability.

An important element to creating opportunities for Hispanic-Latinos to build wealth, whether as a business owner or an employee, is ensuring that young people recognize higher education as a pathway to achieve success. That means partnering with colleges and universities and investing in job creation, skills-building, and support services for students to do so. Locally, we do this with EMERGE Fellowship and with the University of Houston College of Medicine. When we invest in students, we are investing in future professionals and business leaders who will build Hispanic-Latino wealth and contribute to Houston’s economy and culture. This is something we can celebrate together for years to come.

Investing in sustainable homeownership

Sustainable homeownership provides a lasting investment for future generations and cycles capital into the community. The National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals (NAHREP) recently released data showing an increase in Latino homeownership, from 47.5 percent in 2019 to 48.4 percent in 2021, the highest level since the mid-2000s. Through the Community Homeownership Commitment, which provides low down payment loans and closing cost grants, families can take their savings and turn them into lasting legacies. It is a pillar for families to build wealth.

Here in Houston, we also support organizations that assist with homeownership, like Tejano Center, Avenue CDC, and Houston Habitat for Humanity. Building Hispanic-Latino home equity increases the amount of capital families can use now or in the future helping build our Houston economy.

During the past decade, the rate of Hispanic-Latino economic development has far outpaced rates among non-Hispanics. Supporting and honoring our Hispanic-Latino clients is not just a month-long initiative, it is a long-term, generational investment in America and we are proud to be investing in a stronger economy for Houston now and for years to come.

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Rick Jaramillo is the market executive for Bank of America Houston.

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