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Rice University, Houston Methodist announce human performance joint research project

A new collaboration between Houston institutions is looking into physiology, injury prevention, and rehabilitation. Photo via Getty Images

Rice University and Houston Methodist have teamed up to launch an initiative designed to enhance research and education about human performance.

The Houston Methodist-Rice University Center for Human Performance will enable physicians, academic researchers, and university students to collaborate with student athletes, trainers, and coaches. Their work will advance joint research, establish critical care programs, and promote educational activities in exercise physiology, injury prevention, and rehabilitation.

“Enhancing performance means optimizing results, and the study of human performance applies to more than sports,” Heidi Perkins, teaching professor and chair of Rice’s Department of Kinesiology, says in a news release. “Research in human performance benefits athletes, but it also benefits older adults, performing artists, people with disabilities, surgical patients — basically anyone who needs to function better and improve their quality of life through some combination of physical activity, nutrition, sleep, and the like.”

The center — led by Houston Methodist’s Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Rice Kinesiology, and Rice Athletics — is being housed in 6,000 square feet of renovated space at the university’s Tudor Fieldhouse. Technology at the center will allow such activities as 3D motion capture, measurement of bone density, cardiovascular screening, and aerobic performance testing.

Tom Killian, dean of natural sciences at Rice, says development of the center is a “transformational moment” for the university’s kinesiology department.

“The Center for Human Performance will attract new faculty, provide student research and internship opportunities, and create opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborations between Rice Kinesiology faculty and peers in biomechanics, neuroscience, human factors, robotics, wearable technologies, data sciences, biosciences, and other disciplines,” Killian says.

Dr. Patrick McCulloch, the John S. Dunn Chair of Orthopedics at Houston Methodist, says the center offers a “unique opportunity” to propel research and knowledge about human performance.

“Researchers with the center will develop novel techniques to prevent, treat, and recover from musculoskeletal injuries and diseases,” McCulloch says. “Ultimately, these efforts will have a huge benefit for our patients at Houston Methodist. High-performance athletes, older adults, and everyone in between will have access to treatment that is informed by the cutting-edge research undertaken at the center.”

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Cemvita reported a successful pilot program on its gold hydrogen project in the Permian Basin. Photo courtesy of Cemvita

Houston-based cleantech startup Cemvita Factory is kicking things into high gear with its Gold Hydrogen product.

After successfully completing a pilot test of Gold Hydrogen in the oil-rich Permian Basin of West Texas, Cemvita has raised an undisclosed amount of funding through its new Gold H2 LLC spin-out. The lead investors are Georgia-based equipment manufacturer Chart Industries and 8090 Industries, an investment consortium with offices in New York City and Los Angeles.

Gold Hydrogen provides carbon-neutral hydrogen obtained from depleted oil and gas wells. This is achieved through bioengineering subsurface microbes in the wells to consume carbon and generate clean hydrogen.

Cemvita says it set up Gold H2 to commercialize the business via licensing, joint ventures, and outright ownership of hydrogen assets.

“We have incredible conviction in next-generation clean hydrogen production methods that leverage the vast and sprawling existing infrastructure and know-how of the oil and gas industry,” Rayyan Islam, co-founder and general partner of 8090 Industries, says in a news release.

Traditional methods of producing hydrogen without greenhouse gas emissions include electrolysis powered by renewable sources like wind, solar or water, according to Cemvita. However, production of green hydrogen through normal avenues eats up a lot of energy and money, the startup says.

By contrast, Cemvita relies on depleted oil and gas wells to cheaply produce carbon-free hydrogen.

“The commercialization and economics of the hydrogen economy will require technologies that produce the hydrogen molecule at a meaningful scale with no carbon emissions. Gold H2 is leading the charge … ,” says Jill Evanko, president and CEO of Chart Industries.

Investors in Cemvita include Oxy Low Carbon Ventures, an investment arm of Houston-based Occidental Petroleum, as well as BHP Group, Mitsubishi, and United Airlines Ventures.

Oxy Low Carbon Ventures and United Airlines Ventures are financing Cemvita’s work on sustainable jet fuel. United Airlines operates a hub at George Bush Intercontinental Airport Houston.

Founded by brother-and-sister team Moji and Tara Karimi in 2017, Cemvita uses synthetic biology to turn carbon dioxide into chemicals and alternative fuels.

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