helping hands

Houston startup pivots to make communication software for hospitals limiting visitors

Truss has modified its software to advance communications while hospitals are cracking down on visitors amid the coronavirus outbreak. Getty Images

With hospitals cracking down on people allowed into patient rooms, a Houston startup has adjusted its software to provide a solution to communications issues between patients, doctors, and family members.

Houston-based Truss usually focuses on digital community engagement, but Patrick Schneidau, CEO of the company, says he felt called to do something to help families separated due to strict emergency visitation rules at hospitals.

"You read all the stories of loved ones not being able to be together during this time," Schneidau says. "That was the area we wanted to focus on."

Schneidau describes the software as a secure portal for small groups to interact via smart devices. Physicians can interface with family members via video chat or recorded messages, as well as answer any questions.

"We've done some preliminary research — doctors themselves want to communicate with the family," Schneidau says, "but they can't be on six different phone calls throughout the day for one patient."

So as not to burden hospital staff unnecessarily, the platform would also provide answers to common questions and resources. Perhaps most importantly, the software can allow patients to interact with their family members from afar.

According to Schneidau, Truss is seeking hospitals that might be interested in the technology and recognizes that hospitals are currently jumping on new tech opportunities in this time of crisis, like Houston Methodist, which is equipping its hospital rooms with tablets.

"We've talked to a number of hospitals, and every one is facing this issue," Schneidau says. "We're figuring out who would be the right people to participate in the tool itself."

Beyond the COVID-19 pandemic, Schneidau, who's a member if InnovationMap's board of directors, says he thinks the platform could be helpful communications in nursing homes.

"The outside forces being what they are and preventing visitors in the room doesn't preclude the need to communicate with family members," says Schneidau. "So you have to come up with an innovative solution very quickly to be able to address that particular issue. This is a possible answer to that."

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Building Houston

 
 

Some 49 percent of Houston workers are burned out at work. Getty Images

Local workers who're especially dreading that commute or cracking open the laptop in the morning aren't alone. A new study reveals that nearly half of Houston laborers are more burned out on the job.

Some 49 percent of Bayou City residents report to be burned out at work, according to employment industry website Robert Half. That's significantly higher than last year, when only 37 percent reported burnout in a similar poll.

Meanwhile, more than one in four Houston workers (28 percent) say that they will not unplug from work when taking time off this summer.

Not surprisingly, American workers are ready for a vacation. Per a press release, the research also reveals:

  • One in four workers lost or gave up paid time off in 2020
  • One in three plans to take more than three weeks of vacation time this year

Elsewhere in Texas, the burnout is real. In Dallas, 50 percent of workers report serious burnout. More than a quarter — 26 percent — of Dallasites fear they won't disconnect from the office during summer vacation.

In fun-filled Austin, 45 percent of the workforce complain of burnout. Some 32 percent of Austinites feel they can unplug from work during the summer.

Fortunately for us, the most burned-out city in the U.S. isn't in the Lone Star State. That dubious title goes to the poor city of Charlotte, North Carolina, where 55 percent of laborers are truly worn out.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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